LIBRO CON CD

THE ROOTS OF JAZZ, The songs and licks that made it happen. Fred Sokolow. CD TABLATURE

THE ROOTS OF JAZZ. CD TABLATURE
The songs and licks that made it happen. 

Dinah
East Of The Sun (And West Of The Moon)
Honeysuckle Rose
I'll Remember April
Rose Room
Yesterdays

The Roots of Jazz Guitar
Series: Guitar Collection
Format: Softcover with CD - TAB
Composer: Fred Sokolow
Inventory #HL 00699082
ISBN: 9780793577347
UPC: 073999990829
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
64 pages

A complete survey of jazz guitar, its pioneers and how it developed. Includes: six note-for-note transcriptions of famous standards pivotal to the genre; instruction in the essential playing styles; the history and development of jazz guitar; biographies of the pioneering artists; a recording of the songs, exercises, and licks; and more.

Songs include:

- Dinah (Eddie Lang)

- East of the Sun (And West of the Moon) (Barney Kessel)

- Honeysuckle Rose (Charlie Christian)

- I'll Remember April (George Van Eps)

- Rose Room (Django Reinhardt)

- Yesterdays (Wes Montgomery).

64 pages.

 

MUSCAL INTRODUCTION
A LOOK AT THE ROOTS OF JAZZ GUITAR
At the beginning of the twentieth century, New Orleans bands began combining two traditions: They
borrowed some repertoire from European bands, which often included strings, horns, and a piano,
and performed classical pieces, polkas, mazurkas, sentimental ballads and waltzes. They also imitated
Southern string bands, sometimes called "spasm bands," which consisted of guitars, banjos, violins,
mandolins and string bass, and who played ragtime, blues, jigs and reels. New Orleans bandleaders
like Buddy Bolden and Kid Ory used all these instruments and fused the musical styles, and
their music began to be identified as "jazz."
Johnny St. Cyr, who played with Kid Ory, Jelly Roll Morton and many of the New Orleans bands,
was typical of the first jazz guitarists: he was a four-string banjo player who played guitar as a sideline.
Seldom soloing, he strummed four-beats-to-the-bar and provided bands with a rhythmic backbone.
In pre-microphone days, banjo was audible over loud horns; guitar did not cut it. But in the
'20s, as phonograph recordings gained popularity, the guitar became more prominent. It was easier
to record than banjo.

HOT JAZZ: GUITARIN THE '20s
Jazz was the hot popular dance music of the decade that is often called "The Jazz Age."
Accomplished pickers like Roy Smeck, Nick Lucas and Lonnie Johnson performed the first melodic
guitar solos on records in the 1920s. These versatile players played popular tunes, blues and
whatever the traffic would bear, sometimes fingerpicking but usually flatpicking scales, chords and
arpeggios. But most performing guitarists in jazz bands simply strummed chords, until Eddie Lang
came along.
Lang performed with many of the popular ensembles of his day, including the Goldkette Orchestra,
Red Nichols and the Five Pennies, Paul Whiteman and Bing Crosby. One of the first studio guitar
aces, he accompanied most of the stars of his era on records. Live and in the studio, Lang combined
rhythmic strumming with a melodic soloing style, opening up new possibilities for a whole generation
of guitarists. When he died, in 1933, he left a recorded legacy of ensemble work, solos and duets
with Lonnie Johnson and with lifelong musical companion, violinist Joe Venuti. He inspired countless
jazz banjoists to play guitar, and to be melodic as well as rhythmic. The guitar became a soloing
voice in jazz.

THE '30s SWING ERA
During the swing or big-band era, guitarists in popular swing orchestras played rhythm. Count
Basie's guitarist, Freddie Greene, never played a solo. Some guitarists like Carl Kress, Dick
McDonough, George Van Eps and George Barnes followed Eddie Lang's lead and created beautiful,
harmonically rich, chord-based soloing styles. They recorded solos, duets and small ensemble "listening"
(not dancing) records for jazz afficionados. Like Lang, they usually played Gibson L-5 archtop guitars.
Meanwhile, inspired players like Snoozer Quinn, Teddy Bunn and Oscar Aleman (who played an allmetal
National guitar) helped develop the art of single-note jazz soloing throughout the '30s. But the
creative genius who caught most listeners' and players' ears was the Belgian gypsy, Django Reinhardt.
The first international jazz star, Reinhardt rose to fame playing with his "quintette" in Paris. Although
his own style and his duets with violinist Stephane Grappelli were admittedly based on the
LangNenuti model, he took single-note guitar soloing to new heights. His ad-lib improvisations were
fiery, tender, incredibly inventive, and he always swung. Budding country, blues and jazz guitarists
memorized his solos.
 

DINAH, EDDIE LANG

Born into a musical Italian family October 25, 1902 in Philadelphia, Salvatore Massaro studied violin
and music theory at age seven. By his teens he was playing four- and six-string banjo in pop
orchestras, often with his boyhood friend, violinist Joe Venuti. Venuti claims Lang was self-taught,
and the only guitarist he recalls Lang mentioning as an inspiration was Segovia. When asked who
Lang imitated, Venuti said "Who else was there? Eddie started it all."
In 1924, using the name of boyhood baseball hero Eddie Lang, he joined the Mound City Blue
Blowers, a sort of jug band, as a guitarist. The recordings he made with them demonstrate why
Lang is said to have legitimized guitar as a jazz instrument: instead of simply strumming the chords,
he played several chords per measure, and peppered his backup with bass runs, passing tones,
arpeggios, single-string fills, bluesy string-bending and harmonics.
In the next several years, Lang was increasingly in demand as a performer. He played with the big
bands of Jean Goldkette (where he befriended Bix Beiderbecke), Roger Kahn, Adrian Rollini, and
Paul Whiteman. Although he was capable of reading music, Lang played by ear. During his tenure
with Whiteman, he kept a piece of paper the size of a business card in his pocket that contained on
it (in markings only decipherable by Lang) everything he needed to know about Whiteman's musical
repertoire. When Whiteman's singer, Bing Crosby, went solo, Lang became Crosby's guitarist and
appeared with him in the 1932 film, The Big Broadcast.
One of the first versatile studio guitarists, Lang recorded with Red Nichols and His Five Pennies,
Cliff Edwards (known as Ukulele Ike), AI Jolson, Ruth Etting, Sophie Tucker, the Boswell Sisters,
Emmett Miller and a host of blues singers, including Bessie Smith, Victoria Spivey and Texas
Alexander. His technique was most audible when he recorded solo (often composing his own
songs), and in duets with Joe Venuti or with small ensembles such as Venuti's Blue Four or Blue
Five. These were probably the first listening (not dancing) jazz recordings. Using the name "Blind
Willie Dunn," he recorded memorable duets with guitarist Lonnie Johnson, the other guitar giant of
the '20s, who, like Lang, played both blues and jazz.
By 1933, when Lang died of complications from a tonsillectomy, most jazz bands had switched from
banjo to guitar, and most guitarists were playing the archtop, F-hole instrument Lang preferred.
Using blues and classical techniques, he inspired the first generation of jazz guitarists, most of
whom agree: Lang laid the groundwork for jazz guitar.

PERFORMANCE NOTES
"Dinah" features Lang's backup and lead styles. It has a typical pop song structure, and in 1928 Joe
Venuti's Blue Four, recording for Okeh Records in New York City, gave it the usual jazz treatment
(see as follows). Released in Europe by Parlaphone, it was one of the "chamber jazz" sides that
made Venuti and Lang internationally famous. The quartet consisted of Venuti, Lang, a pianist and
baritone sax.

SONG STRUCTURE AND THE JAZZ TREATMENT
Like many pop tunes, "Dinah" has an AABA structure:
• An eight-bar section ("A part") is played twice in a row, with a slightly different ending the second time.
• An eight-bar bridge follows (that's "B").
• The "A part" is repeated.
 

Price: €16,99
€16,99

HOT CLUB SESSION BASIC ACOUSTIC SWING JAZZ GUITAR Felix Schell LIBRO CD TABLATURE

HOT CLUB SESSION BASIC ACOUSTIC SWING JAZZ GUITAR. F. Schell. 7 Pezzi completi, e 5 basi complete, arpeggios, scales, symetrical scales, melodic embellishments. CD TAB.

Product Description:
Finally, a great method which will show you how to play the acoustic jazz guitar in the style of players like Django Reinhardt, Oscar Alleman and Eddie Lang - their style is characterized by a powerful rhythm guitar and a vital swinging single-note solo line. Due to the fact that it can be very hard to master the original transcriptions, this book simplifies this style without losing the essence of the original sound. Written in standard notation and TAB, the material can be played by students and players that master the easy to intermediate level on plectrum style jazz guitar. All titles are included on CD, as well as some play along tracks which offer a great possibility to improvise on typical gypsy chord changes and rhythms.

Format: Book/CD Set

Song Title: Composer/Source:

Arpeggios
Blues of the Gypsys Felix Schell
Chromatic Line Felix Schell
Dark Eyes Felix Schell
Improvisation
Le Reve Felix Schell
Major & Minor Scales
Melodic Embellishments
Minor Stomp (1) Felix Schell
Minor Stomp (2) Felix Schell
One Note Rhythm (1) Felix Schell
One Note Rhythm (2) Felix Schell
One Note Rhythm (3) Felix Schell
Special Effects
Symmetrical Scales
Waltz for Django Felix Schell

Price: €18,99
€18,99

BLUES & ROCK HARMONICA GLENN WEISER LIBRO CD BASI PENTATONICA IMPROVVISAZIONE

BLUES & ROCK HARMONICA, G. Weiser. CD

Series: Harmonica
Publisher: Centerstream Publications
Medium: Softcover with CD
Artist: Glenn Weiser

By Glenn Weiser Book/CD package for beginners to learn blues and rock improvisation. Includes explanations of scales, modes, chords & other essential elements of music. The 60-minute CD features riffs & solos plus demonstrations and a blues jam to play along with. Goin' Down The Road. 96 pages.

Price: €24,99
€24,99

CHORDS FOR JAZZ GUITAR The Complete Guide to Comping Chord Melody and Chord Soloing CD TABLATURE libro

CHORDS FOR JAZZ GUITAR, The Complete Guide to Comping, Chord Melody and Chord Soloing. CD TABLATURE

Chords for Jazz Guitar
The Complete Guide to Comping, Chord Melody and Chord Soloing
Series: Guitar Educational
Format: Softcover with CD
Author: Charlton Johnson

This book/CD pack will teach you how to play jazz chords all over the fretboard in a variety of styles and progressions. It covers: voicings, progressions, jazz chord theory, comping, chord melody, chord soloing, voice leading and many more topics. The CD includes 98 full-band demo tracks. No tablature. 149 pages.

Inventory #HL 00695706
ISBN: 9780634047145
UPC: 073999793710
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
152 pages

Price: €26,99
€26,99

MODERN JAZZ GUITAR STYLES, André Bush CD TABLATURE SOLOING-Chord Voicings-Modal-Rhythmic Sequencing

MODERN JAZZ GUITAR STYLES, A. Bush. CD TABLATURE

Product Description:
A unique book and CD package including extensive chapters on soloing, chords, rhythm and effects. With in-depth exercises on modern scale applications and intervallic choices, developing individual chord voicings, incorporating rock and funk concepts, exploring elements from world music such as odd meters and polyrhythms, and ideas for developing your own sonic textures and approach to tonal manipulation. Each section features an essay illustrating the musical history and specific innovations of modern jazz guitar masters, with insightful commentary accompanying each concept and example. The last section thoroughly analyzes studio performances of two original compositions incorporating all the above materials. Modern Jazz Guitar Styles provides the serious student or professional seeking to broaden his palette with a comprehensive overview of the current state of jazz guitar.

Extensive chapters on soloing, chords, rhythm and effects

In-depth exercises on modern scale applications and intervallic choices

Ideas for developing your own sonic textures and approach to tonal manipulation

Covers developing individual chord voicings, incorporating rock and funk concepts and exploring elements from world music

Provides serious student/professional a comprehensive overview of current state of jazz guitar

Companion CD included

 

Product Number: 99917BCD
Format: Book/CD Set
ISBN: 0786658657
UPC: 796279073325
ISBN13: 9780786658657
Series: Non-Series
Publisher: Mel Bay Publications, Inc.
Date Published: 1/31/2005
104 PAGES

modern jazz guitar styles chapter one introduction &
A jazz steps into the 21st century, creative guitarists have an unprecedented array of musical options at their fingertips. Fundamental study materials are more available in more forms than ever, and contemporary jazz has become infused with the influences of pop, rock, techno, hip-hop, rap, world music, etc. We guitarists may freely draw from not only the musical gestures of these styles, but also the techniques, tones and production values. In so doing, the new breed of jazz guitarist is well within the greatest traditions of jazz, which has always used whatever means necessary to express itself. Consider Dizzy Gillespie's championing of Afro-Cuban music, Illinois Jacquet's growling, distorted tone or Miles Davis' radical transformation of Tin Pan Alley and show tunes. As soon as technology permitted, jazz musicians recorded extended improvisations and compositions, and the advent of the electric guitar itself allowed guitarists to utilize be-bop phraseology.
The seminal work of modem jazz guitar pioneers such as John McLaughlin, Larry Coryell, Pat Metheny, John Scofield, Bill Frisell, Ralph Towner and many others now enters the jazz continuum and stands equally alongside the work of Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Jim Hall etc. While these great artists deliberately set about combining rock and jazz styles, a new generation of jazz guitarists accepts these techniques as matter of fact. The sounds of Jimi Hendrix and Charlie Parker sit side by side in the new jazz guitar vocabulary.
In this book we will explore modem soloing techniques, chord playing, rhythmic theory and its practical application. Throughout, we will examine major guitarist/composers of recent years and how various styles from outside the jazz tradition have informed their work. There will also be a chapter on signal processing devices and their role in jazz guitar. Woven into all chapters and their various subjects will be commentary on specific artistis and albums where you can find great examples of the particular technique or effect. Also, I will begin every chapter with a short essay, which will try to give some historical context to the materials and times.
I will include a detailed analysis of two original compositions from my CD Invisible City (Quicksil ver Records/Odd Culture Productions) in which we will take an in-depth look at the compositional material, guitar techniques and effects, with an eye on all the material presented here. 1'11 conclude with a list of suggested listening and reading, where I will recommend CDs by many of the artists we've looked at, and related reading and viewing material.
While this volume contains some material that may be helpful and of interest to the beginning or intermediate player, I have geared most of the material and subject matter to the serious student of jazz guitar. While this list is by no means definitive, I would consider a basic grasp of the following material to be prerequisite to the subject matter in this book.

1. Major, melodic and harmonic minor scales, their modes and chords, as well as the diminished, whole-tone and pentatonic scales.

2. Basic fretboard harmony, including standard voicings for all major, minor, dominant and
diminished 7th chords, with extensions.

3. Basic principals of chord substitutions (i.e. tritone substitution, backcycling, triad over bass,
reharmonizing, etc.)

4. Knowledge of a good number of jazz standards (melody, chord changes and improvisational
analysis), preferably memorized.

5. Familiarity with the history of jazz guitar and the ability to identify major figures from all eras by ear. ...
 

modern jazz guitar styles chapter one introduction &
A jazz steps into the 21st century, creative guitarists have an unprecedented array of musical options at their fingertips. Fundamental study materials are more available in more forms than ever, and contemporary jazz has become infused with the influences of pop, rock, techno, hip-hop, rap, world music, etc. We guitarists may freely draw from not only the musical gestures of these styles, but also the techniques, tones and production values. In so doing, the new breed of jazz guitarist is well within the greatest traditions of jazz, which has always used whatever means necessary to express itself. Consider Dizzy Gillespie's championing of Afro-Cuban music, Illinois Jacquet's growling, distorted tone or Miles Davis' radical transformation of Tin Pan Alley and show tunes. As soon as technology permitted, jazz musicians recorded extended improvisations and compositions, and the advent of the electric guitar itself allowed guitarists to utilize be-bop phraseology.
The seminal work of modem jazz guitar pioneers such as John McLaughlin, Larry Coryell, Pat Metheny, John Scofield, Bill Frisell, Ralph Towner and many others now enters the jazz continuum and stands equally alongside the work of Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Jim Hall etc. While these great artists deliberately set about combining rock and jazz styles, a new generation of jazz guitarists accepts these techniques as matter of fact. The sounds of Jimi Hendrix and Charlie Parker sit side by side in the new jazz guitar vocabulary.
In this book we will explore modem soloing techniques, chord playing, rhythmic theory and its practical application. Throughout, we will examine major guitarist/composers of recent years and how various styles from outside the jazz tradition have informed their work. There will also be a chapter on signal processing devices and their role in jazz guitar. Woven into all chapters and their various subjects will be commentary on specific artistis and albums where you can find great examples of the particular technique or effect. Also, I will begin every chapter with a short essay, which will try to give some historical context to the materials and times.
I will include a detailed analysis of two original compositions from my CD Invisible City (Quicksil ver Records/Odd Culture Productions) in which we will take an in-depth look at the compositional material, guitar techniques and effects, with an eye on all the material presented here. 1'11 conclude with a list of suggested listening and reading, where I will recommend CDs by many of the artists we've looked at, and related reading and viewing material.
While this volume contains some material that may be helpful and of interest to the beginning or intermediate player, I have geared most of the material and subject matter to the serious student of jazz guitar. While this list is by no means definitive, I would consider a basic grasp of the following material to be prerequisite to the subject matter in this book.

1. Major, melodic and harmonic minor scales, their modes and chords, as well as the diminished, whole-tone and pentatonic scales.

2. Basic fretboard harmony, including standard voicings for all major, minor, dominant and
diminished 7th chords, with extensions.

3. Basic principals of chord substitutions (i.e. tritone substitution, backcycling, triad over bass,
reharmonizing, etc.)

4. Knowledge of a good number of jazz standards (melody, chord changes and improvisational
analysis), preferably memorized.

5. Familiarity with the history of jazz guitar and the ability to identify major figures from all eras by ear.
 

modern jazz guitar styles andre bush biography
Guitarist and composer Andre Bush draws from a wide range of influences in his music. He combines the
lyrical and creative approach of modem jazz heroes such as Wayne Shorter, Keith Jarrett and Pat Metheny with the
high-energy grooves and complex sonic structures of innovative guitarists such as John McLaughlin, Sco
Henderson and Nguyen Le. In addition to a thorough grounding in the jazz tradition, his extensive experience in
the world of rock and pop give him a unique musical outlook. Andre's playing seamlessly reconciles the
disparate worlds and establishes his conception as a natural and logical extension of the jazz guitar tradition.
Andre's new album, Start From Silence, pairs Andre with master pianist Art Lande and an allstar ban
performing his complex yet accessible compositions. Challenging rhythms, beautiful harmony, poignant lyricism.
and brilliant improvisation combine to create a cohesive and unique album.
Start From Silence follows up Invisible City (Quicksilver/Increase,) an album that featured jazz icons Dave
Liebman and Steve Smith. Invisible City emerged as one of the most critically acclaimed releases of 2000, nam
"CD of the Year" by the Jazz Review, and was added to hundreds of jazz radio stations nationwide, appearing 0
both CMJ and Gavin jazz charts.
Andre has performed or recorded with Dave Liebman, Steve Smith, Paul McCandless, Art Lande, Kenn_
emer, James Genus, Charlie Haden, Tootie Heath, George Cables, Buster Williams, Carl Allen, Andy NarelL
Darol Anger, Matt Rollings, Liz Story, Will Ackerman, Paul Hanson, Jack Perla and many others. Andre h
maintained a longtime musical partnership with Jenna Mammina, serving as her guitarist musical director ~
several albums and tours. He has appeared at the Mt. Hood Jazz Festival, San Francisco Jazz Festival, Montere_
Jazz Festival, Vancouver International Jazz Festival, Windham Hill's Winter Solstice tour and in clubs and theate
around the country. As a session guitarist, Andre has appeared with various bands at the Lilith Fair, on VHI an
TV and Alice Radio nationwide, contributed to many recording projects, and toured with a wide variety _
international artists.
Andre is a naturally gifted teacher who clarifies and inspires enthusiasm for complex musical concepts. H
i in frequent demand in the US and Europe as a guitar clinician and jazz educator.
Currently, Andre is touring in support of Start From Silence and Modern Jazz Guitar Styles. He teache
The Jazzschool in Berkeley, CA and at his home studio, is a frequent faculty member at Stanford Jazz Worksh
and Jazzcamp West and is a regular contributor to Guitar Player Magazine.
For information on concerts, clinics, workshops or seminars please contact:
odd culture productions, San Francisco.

 


Contents:

1) Introduction.4
2) Scales / Single Note Soloing.
In this chapter we will explore modern approaches to single note soloing.
Modern intervallic choices, scalar approaches, picking techniques and
articulation such as sweeps and legato phrasing will be covered, as well
as a few practicing ideas.

3) Chords.28
Here we will cover some approaches to modern chord voicings. We'll
focus on breaking out of standard chord forms and developing voice
leading. Quartal harmony, cluster voicings and modern substitutions
will be covered.

4) Rhythm44
In this chapter we will explore ways in which various rhythmic languages
have been integrated into jazz in the past three decades. Odd meters,
brazilian rhythms, Indian theory as well as some metronome basics will
be explored.

5) Effects..71
In this chapter we will explore signal processing, tonal manipulation, detuning,
etc. in modern jazz guitar. We'll cover time-based effects (reverb, delays, etc)
tonal effects (distortion, chorusing), amp technology, and how they have been
integrated into several different guitarists musical languages.

6) Analysis of "Odd Culture, This" and "Past and Future Warriors"..76
In this chapter I'll give a detailed analysis of two songs from my album Invisible
City (Odd Culture Productions/Quicksilver Records). Many of the elements that
we've studied throughout the book are present here, such as odd meters, modern
chord voicings and jazz/rock guitar techniques, so this will be a good opportunity
to explore these elements from the ground up.

7) Listening / Reading / Viewing / Bibliography / Study Materials.85
I'll conclude the book with a list and comments on several artists, their CDs, books and videos, to further help your studies. You'll be familiar with some of
these players, but others may be new and definitely worth checking out. Also
included will be a list of additional study materials.

 


Tuning Note A 440 and Introduction
Intervallic Ideas Using Major Scale Modes on a ii-V-I
Intervallic Ideas Using Major Scale Modes on a Pedal Tone
Intervallic Ideas Using Dorian Mode on One Chord
Intervallic Ideas on a Progression Similar to "Giant Steps"
Bluesy Ideas Using Melodic Minor Modes on a Minor ii-V-i
Intervallic Ideas Using sus b9 Mode on One Chord
Intervallic and Bluesy Ideas on a Progression Similar to "Stella By Starlight"
Funky Ideas Using Half-Whole Diminished Scale
Ideas Using Half-Whole Diminished Scale on a ii-V-I
Ideas Using Half-Whole Diminished Scale on a ii-V-I
Pentatonic Scale for Maj7(~11)
Pentatonic Scale for Maj7(:11) on a ii-V-I
Pentatonic Scale for Maj7(:11) on a ii-V-I
Pentatonic Scale for Altered Dominant Chords on a Turnaround
Melodic Sequencing on a Minor ii-V-I
Melodic Sequencing on a Minor ii-V-I
Melodic Sequencing on One Chord
Melodic Sequencing on One Chord
Melodic Sequencing on a Progression Similar to Have You Met Miss Jones?"
Legato Phrasing Techniques on a Major Scale
Legato Phrasing Techniques on One Chord
Sweep Picking Demonstration
Sweep Picking on a Minor ii-V-I
Sweep Picking on Arpeggio Combinations
Right Hand Tapping Demonstration
Right Hand Tapping Demonstration, Extended Example
Right Hand Tapping for Voicing a Chord
Open and Stopped String Combinations for a Major Scale
Open and Stopped String Combinations in a Melody
Fourth-Based Voicings for Major Scale Harmony
Fourth-Based Voicings for Melodic Minor Scale Harmony
Modal Voicings from the Major Scale Using Adjacent Strings
Modal Voicings from the Major Scale Mixing Adjacent and Non-Adjacent Strings
Modal Voicings from the Melodic Minor Scale Using Adjacent Strings
Modal Voicings from the Melodic Minor Scale
Mixing Adjacent and Non-Adjacent Strings
Chord Voicings Mixing Stopped and Open Strings
Chord Voicings Mixing Stopped and Open Strings
Chord Voicings Mixing Stopped and Open Strings on a ii-V-I
Modal Voicings Mixing Stopped and Open Strings
Chord Etude on a Progression Similar to "'SoWhat" or "Impressions"
Chord Etude on a Progression Similar to "Stella By Starlight"
Chord Etude on a Progression Similar to "Blue Bossa"
Comping in the Style of John McLaughlin
Hammond B3-Style Comping
Single Note Comping
Rhythm Etude Using a Single Note
Rhythm Etude Incorporating Melody
Rhythm Etude in 3/4
Vamp in 5/4 on One Chord
Vamp In 5/4 with Harmonic Modulation
Etude In 7/8 with Basic Subdivisions
Etude in 7/8 Adding Melody
Etude in 7/8 Adding Melody with Various Rhythmic Figures and Chord Voicings
Etude in 7/4 on a Progression Similar to "All the Things You Are" 54-
Etude on an 11/8 Blues
Funk Etude in 7/4
Metric Modulation, 4/4 to 3/4
Metric Modulation, 4/4 to 7/8
Rhythmic Displacement
Rhythmic Displacement with more Complex
Melody and Variation
Rhythmic Displacement through a Chord Progression
Rhythmic Sequencing on One Chord
Rhythmic Sequencing on One Chord
Rhythmic Sequencing on a Turnaround
Counting Subdivisions in 15/8
Counting in 15/8, Emphasizing First Beat of Each Subdivision
15/8 Groove, Adding Melody
15/8 Groove with Melody, Adding Rests and Ties
15/8 Groove, Adding Chord Progression and Melody
Basic Montuno for Guitar
Montuno for Guitar with Modem Harmony
Basic Bossa Nova Rhythm Guitar Pattern
Bossa Nova in 5/4
2 Against 3 Polyrhythm
12/8, 6/8,3/4 Polyrhythm
2 and 4 Against 3 Polyrhythm on a Progression Similar to "Someday My Prince Will Come"
Demonstration of Implied Metric Modulation
Short Composition Incorporating Implied Metric Modulation
Odd Culture, this from "Invisible City" (Odd Culture Productions/Quicksilver Records)
Past and Future Warriors from Invisible City (Odd Culture
Productions/Quicksilver Records)

Andre Bush cover photo
Danie/ Gohstand - danie/photo.com
Guitar images (AES620 series) courtesy of Yamaha
Recorded by Peter Wolf at Wolfsound Productions
 

Price: €24,49
€24,49

Hal Leonard Method JAZZ GUITAR Jeff Schroedl CD TABLATURE LIBRO METODO SPARTITI CHITARRA

JAZZ GUITAR. J. Schroedl. CD TAB.

Softcover with CD - TAB
Author: Jeff Schroedl

Featuring in-depth lessons and 40 great jazz classics, the Hal Leonard Jazz Guitar Method is your complete guide to learning jazz guitar. This book uses real jazz songs to teach you the basics of accompanying and improvising jazz guitar in the style of Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Tal Farlow, Charlie Christian, Jim Hall and many others. Lesson topics include: chords and progressions; scales and licks; comping and soloing styles; chord-melody; intros and endings; technique; equipment and sound; and more!

Songs include: Satin Doll - Take the A Train - Billie's Bounce - Impressions - Bluesette - My One and Only Love - Desafinado - Autumn Leaves - Watch What Happens - Misty - Song for My Father , and more. The CD contains 99 tracks for demonstration and play-along.

"Highly Recommended." Just Jazz Guitar

"Filled with well-written examples ... bask in the glory of having a lot of great material at your fingertips." Downbeat
80 pages

Autumn Leaves
Billie's Bounce (Bill's Bounce)
Bluesette
The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting On An Open Fire)
Desafinado
Easy Living
Honeysuckle Rose
I Remember You
Impressions
Mr. P.C.
Misty
My One And Only Love
My Romance
A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square
Ornithology
Road Song
Samba De Orfeu
Satin Doll
Song For My Father
Take The 'A' Train
Watch What Happens

Price: €26,99
€26,99

SAUNDERS BRUCE, MELODIC IMPROVISING FOR GUITAR. CD TABLATURE

SAUNDERS BRUCE, MELODIC IMPROVISING FOR GUITAR. CD TAB.

Product Description:
"Melodic Improvising" is a systematic, detailed method to help the intermediate to advanced guitarist create melodies over harmony. Using techniques developed through his 15 years of teaching improvisation at the world-renowned Berklee College of Music, Bruce Saunders' book teaches guitarists the same techniques used by pianists and brass and woodwind players to create melodic solos; a necessary book for any guitarist wishing to play "outside the box."

Product Number: 20216BCD
Format: Book/CD Set
ISBN: 0786668458
UPC: 796279089869
ISBN13: 9780786668458
Series: Non-Series
Publisher: Mel Bay Publications, Inc.

Chapter 1: Stepwise Movement
Chapter 2: Intervallic Movement
Chapter 3: Patterns, Triads, & Chords Through Changes

Price: €19,99
€19,99

CARTER RON BUILDING JAZZ BASS LINES LIBRO CD CONTRABBASSO compendium techniques PLAY-ALONG

CARTER RON, BUILDING JAZZ BASS LINES. CD TAB.

Table of contents:

Eight
Little Waltz
Nearly

Series: Bass Builders
Medium: Softcover with CD

Artist: Ron Carter
In this book/CD pack, bass legend Ron Carter illustrates step by step the basic concepts of creating bass lines; constructing lines using non-harmonic tones and diverse rhythms; playing in fast tempos; and developing tone and pitch. Includes a play-along CD with an all-star rhythm section and isolated bass parts, so players can listen to Ron play the sample written lines, practice them with the CD, then create their own lines with the guitar, piano and drums backing them up. 48 pages.

Price: €23,99
€23,99

AFRO CUBAN SLAP BASS LINES. Oscar Stagnaro. CD TABLATURE

AFRO CUBAN SLAP BASS LINES. CD TAB.

Series: Berklee Methods
Publisher: Berklee Press
Softcover with CD - TAB
Author: Oscar Stagnaro

Afro-Cuban rhythms are hot, and the bass is the beating heart of the groove! Now you can learn to play slap bass in seven popular Afro-Cuban styles: cha cha, son montuno, songo, timba, Afro-Cuban 6/8, Latin jazz, and Latin jazz in 7. Whether you read tab or standard notation, you will quickly learn all these styles and develop your slap bass techniques to create style-appropriate articulations. The included CD has percussion tracks, play-along tracks and complete songs to help you improve your groove to an Afro-Cuban rhythm. Grammy-winning bassist Oscar Stagnaro is one of today's top players and a pioneer in bass education. He is an associate professor at Berklee College of Music, where he helped found the Latin bass studies department. He is co-author of The Latin Bass Book. 56 pages.

Price: €21,00
€21,00

KOCH GREG, RHYTHM RIFFS Over 200 Riffs in All Styles Hal Leonard Guitar Method CD TABLATURE DOMINANT 7TH

Rhythm Riffs, Over 200 Riffs in All Styles Hal Leonard Guitar Method

LIBRO PER CHITARRA CON CD E TABLATURE

Series: Guitar Method
Format: Softcover with CD
Arranger: Greg Koch

Also available:
Lead Licks – 00697345

Inventory #HL 00697346
ISBN: 9780634048487
UPC: 073999973464
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
48 pages

 

KOCH GREG, RHYTHM RIFFS. 200 riffs. CD TABLATURE

Over 200 Riffs in All Styles Hal Leonard Guitar Method
Series: Guitar Method
Medium: Softcover with CD
Arranger: Greg Koch

Are you tired of playing the same riffs over and over again? Or maybe you just don't know what to play during your solo? Loaded with new ideas, Rhythm Riffs gives you the tools to spice up your rhythm guitar playing and make your parts more authentic. This book/CD pack covers rock, blues, jazz, country, funk and "outside" styles. It gives you major, minor and dominant 7th riffs for nearly any musical situation - over 200 riffs in all! The CD includes each riff played at full speed and at a slower practice tempo. 48 pages.

INTRODUCTION

RIFFS MAJOR
RIFFS MINOR
RIFFS DOMINANT 7TH.
12 -BAR VARIATIONS
TUNING

INTRODUCTION

Do you find yourself reaching for the same chord shapes again and again when you pick up a guitar? What if someone asks you to "play something bluesy" on a G chord-do you know what to do? How would you like to spice up your rhythm guitar playing, make your parts more authentic, or maybe just get some new ideas? Rhythm Riffs is a unique book designed for the intermediate to advanced guitarist to increase your playing vocabulary exponentially. Whether you're playing in a band, writing songs, accompanying others, or just jamming with friends, there's so much more you can do-other than strum!-when playing rhythm guitar.

ABOUT THE RIFFS
What is a "riff?" A riff is a rhythmic theme that can contain single notes or chords. What goes into a riff can really depend on the style of music or even the particular player. A riff can include any of these elements:
• unique chord voicing(s)
• distinctive rhythm(s)
• hammer-ons/pull-offs
• fills & ornaments
• passing tones & chords
• unusual playing techniques
• other embellishments

The possibilities are nearly endless!
When it comes right down to it, most songs are the same. That is, they're all based on chords. What makes one song-or style, or artist-different from another, is what they do with those chords. This is where Rhythm Riffs comes in.
Each riff in this book is based on a simple chord-like A, Em, G7, etc. The chord label doesn't necessarily reflect the actual voicing used; it just shows you what type of chord you may want to play the riff over. This means you can start "plugging in" the riffs right away-putting them into songs, grooves, jams, whatever.
But here's where things get really interesting: Each riff isn't just played once. Instead, through various stylistic nuances, each riff is "morphed" into five different genres of music: rock, blues, jazz, country, and funk.* This gives you an option for just about any style you could possibly play! With twelve major riffs, twelve minor riffs, and twelve dominant seventh riffs, plus the five stylistic variations for each, you've got 180 potential riffs for bolstering your rhythm guitar vocabulary. The last section of the book features eight variations on the 12-bar blues, also done in various styles, which provide interesting rhythmic ideas and chord voicings for this most popular and highly used song form. Folk, R&B, and pop are occasional alternate styles.

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
There is no right or wrong way to use this book. Some players may want to play each riff in its entirety; others will want to pick and choose just a few chord voicings or techniques out of various riffs. Some players may want to focus on one particular style and learn only those riffs. The option is always yours. If you started the book at the beginning, it would take you quite a while to get to some of the ideas at the end. Therefore, you may want to "preview" the book first: Listen to the CD while following along with the book, and keep track of the selections that you like. Make those your first playing priority. On the CD, each riff is played twice (fast, then slow); the total CD length is just over an hour. Track 45 contains tuning notes.

HOW TO PRACTICE
When learning the riff selections, practice them along at a speed at which you can play flawlessly. If you try to play them fast too soon, the "slop factor" can be too great. (Always give yourself plenty of time to learn each riff; there's a lot of them here and the tendency may be to rush, but each riff is worth taking your time with.) Using a metronome is very helpful for gradually speeding up pieces that you are trying to learn. Start at a reasonable tempo, and as your skill dictates, increase the tempo. When trying to apply the riffs, some incubation time is again a good idea. It may help you to have certain tunes in mindperhaps a song for which you're having trouble finding fresh rhythm ideas. You can try the riffs at your next band rehearsal, record them as you playa tune to see how they sound, play along with records, or whatever it takes to feel conversant with them. Never force a riff, though; strive to make your playing musical. When something works, you'll know it. The 12-bar variations at the end of the book can be used in their entirety or can be cross-mutated by joining some of the different variations together. The idea is to give you a strong rhythmic vocabulary for com ping a blues in any genre.

SPECIAL TECHNIQUES
There are two specialized (right-hand) techniques used in this book on occasion-most often in the country-style riffs-that may require a little explaining before we proceed. One is Travis-style picking, and the other is chicken pickin'.
The Travis-style selections in this book are written as two parts like the example below. The lower part can be played with the thumb, while the higher register can be played with the first and second fingers. A hybrid picking ("pick & fingers") approach may also be employed by playing the lower register with your pick while your middle and ring fingers catch the other notes. In either case, muting the lower notes with the palm of your picking hand gives the desired rhythmic approach for this style.

Chicken pickin' means different things to different people, but it basically involves using muting of one form or another to achieve a "clucking"-type sound indicative of a lot of great country guitarists. The muting used to produce chicken pickin', as it occurs in this book, can best be explained with the example below. The three notes of the first A chord are simultaneously plucked by the index, middle, and ring fingers. These same fingers are immediately used to dampen the strings, and the thumb is used to pluck the open A string (which is being muted by the index finger) to produce the "cluck." By rapidly going back and forth between the open chord and the muffled "cluck," your chicken pickin' sequence begins to take shape.

 

RHYTHM RIFFS giver you major, minor, and dominant 7th riffs for nearly any musical situation. Over 200 riffs in all !

CD includes each riff played at full speed and at a slower practica tempo !

 

ROCK

BLUES

JAZZ

COUNTRY

FUNK 

Price: €15,99
€15,99
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