LIBRO CON CD

GUITAR ATLAS: MIDDLE EAST Jeff Peretz CD TABLATURE MAROCCO ALGERIA EGITTO SUDAN TURCHIA ISRAELE KUWAIT

GUITAR ATLAS: MIDDLE EAST. Jeff Peretz. CD TAB.

LIBRO CON CD, IN NOTAZIONE E TABLATURE

Guitar Atlas: Middle East
By Jeff Peretz

SERIES: National Guitar Workshop
CATEGORY: Guitar Method or Supplement
FORMAT: Book & CD

The Guitar Atlas series is your passport to a new world of music. Learn the characteristic rhythms and techniques of some of the world's most remarkable guitar music, discovering the history, origins, and pioneering artists of distinctive styles from around the globe.

This introduction to the exotic music of Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Kuwait, Morocco, Nubia, and neighboring regions includes insights into cultural and religious influences and the major musicians of each locality. Discover unique plucked instruments, the Arabic tone system and exotic scales, and open your mind to new forms of improvisation that will forever alter your approach to soloing. The examples and compositions throughout all 48 pages are presented in standard notation and TAB and demonstrated on an enclosed CD.

Price: €16,00
€16,00

THE BEST OF BLUES GUITAR SIGNATURE LICKS Step-By Styles Techniques of Blues Legends LIBRO CD TABLATURE

THE BEST OF BLUES GUITAR, SIGNATURE. CD TAB.

A Step-By-Step Breakdown of the Guitar Styles and Techniques of the Blues Legends
Series: Signature Licks Guitar
Softcover with CD - TAB
Author: Dave Rubin

Learn the trademark riffs and licks of the blues masters with this informative book/CD pack. Features lessons on 12 classics:

All Your Love (I Miss Loving) (Otis Rush) - Boom Boom (John Lee Hooker) - Born Under a Bad Sign (Albert King) - Cross Road Blues (Crossroads) (Eric Clapton) - Pride and Joy (Stevie Ray Vaughan) - (They Call It) Stormy Monday (Stormy Monday Blues) (T-Bone Walker) -The Thrill Is Gone (B.B. King), and more.

All Your Love (I Miss Loving)
Boom Boom
Born Under A Bad Sign
Catfish Blues
Collins' Mix
Cross Road Blues (Crossroads)
I Smell A Rat
I'm Tore Down
It Hurts Me Too
Pride And Joy
(They Call It) Stormy Monday (Stormy Monday Blues)
The Thrill Is Gone

56 pages

Price: €21,00
€21,00

ROCKIN' THE BLUES-The Best American and British Blues-Rock Guitarists: 1963-1973 CD TABLATURE SPARTITI

ROCKIN' THE BLUES, The Best American and British Blues-Rock Guitarists: 1963-1973. CD TAB.

Series: Guitar Educational
Softcover with CD - TAB
Author: Dave Rubin

Take a journey inside the blues with Dave Rubin's latest book, Rockin' the Blues: 1963-1973. This seminal 10 years produced some of the most influential blues-rock guitarists of all time. Learn about the lives of these trail-blazing guitarists, their individual styles, accomplishments, and techniques, then play along with the accompanying CD and taste the magic yourself. Each chapter delves into the world of a key blues-rock guitarist from this period, with rare photos, historic insights, interviews, and guitar solos written in standard notation and tablature and performed by a full band on the included audio CD. Explore this exciting time in music history with a book that covers it like no other. Artists covered include: Duane Allman, Jeff Beck, Roy Buchanan, Eric Clapton, Alvin Lee, Keith Richards, Robbie Robertson, and others. 64 pages

Price: €31,99
€31,99

STRIDE & SWING PIANO John Valerio Hal Leonard Keyboard Style Series CD LIBRO PIANOFORTE BOOGIE WOOGIE

STRIDE & SWING PIANO. John Valerio. CD

Hal Leonard Keyboard Style Series
Series: keyboard instruction
Medium: Softcover with CD
Author: John Valerio

Focusing on styles such as classic ragtime, early blues & boogie woogie, New Orleans jazz, stride and swing, this new book/CD pack in the Hal Leonard Keyboard Style Series teaches left- and right-hand techniques including chords, bass runs, patterns and more. Key players of these styles Scott Joplin, Jimmy Yancey, Pete Johnson, Jelly Roll Morton, James P. Johnson, Fats Waller, Teddy Wilson and Art Tatum are prominently referenced. Includes 14 full songs to play, and an accompanying CD! 96 pages

 

INTRODUCTION
Welcome
to Stride and Swing Piano! This book is an in-depth look at early solo jazz
piano styles from the 1900s to the 1940s. Many pianists know the term stride as an accompaniment
technique in which the left hand alternates between a bass note and a
chord in an "oom-pah, oom-pah" manner. But stride was also the label given to a style of piano
music that emerged in the 1920s. This was an early form of jazz that evolved from predecessors like
ragtime, blues, and New Orleans style, and culminated in the swing style of the 1930s and' 40s.
Most of the early jazz piano styles up to and including swing piano feature this striding left-hand
motion.
This book traces the evolution of stride and swing piano styles-from their predecessors to their
fullest development; each chapter focuses on a particular style and player:
Classic Ragtime: Though not jazz per se, ragtime was an important forerunner, serving
as a model for styles like New Orleans and stride. Invented by Black Americans, ragtime
emerged during the 1890s and was a strictly written music with formal and rhythmic constraints.
Scott Joplin was its most famous composer.

Blues & Boogie Woogie: Also invented by Black Americans (in the 1800s), blues
was another important forerunner of stride and swing jazz styles. A looser music, blues had
its own melodic material, accompaniment style, and rhythmic feel. Jimmy Yancey was a premiere
blues pianist; Pete Johnson was a well-known player in the faster, boogie woogie style.

New Orleans Jazz: In the early 1900s, New Orleans pianists developed jazz, a style that
merged ragtime with blues, and added improvisation. Jelly Roll Morton was the most important
early jazz pianist. He loosened the "even subdivisions" of ragtime and made jazz swing.

Stride: Stride was a fast, virtuosic piano music born in Harlem during the 1920s and' 30s.
Early stride,
ala James P. Johnson, was more appropriately called "Eastern ragtime" than
later stride, which evolved into a lighter, smoother music, as played by Fats Waller.

Swing: Swing emerged during the mid '30s with jazz big bands. The driving accents of
stride were ironed out, and an even 4/4 pulse became the norm. Teddy Wilson best represented
the swing style; Art Tatum took it to its highest point.

The one element that all of these styles have in common is the almost continuous playing of the
pulse (on every beat) by the left hand. This was accomplished by: 1) bass note vs. chord alternation,
2) the playing of bass lines, or 3) the continuous playing of chords.
Modern jazz piano styles have done away with the left hand's time keeping role [or the most pat1,
and contemporary players are often at a loss when called upon to play the left hand in an older solo
style. Stride and Swing Piano offers an introduction to the usage of traditional left-hand devicesincluding
characteristic chord voicings and bass note intervals, such as octaves and tenths-as well
as right-hand techniques such as single-note lines, chord voicings, intervals, mns, and improvisation.
Each chapter culminates in one or more original tunes demonstrating the style and its techniques.
Practice suggestions are also included. The reader is encouraged to learn and study these
tunes, and to apply all of the techniques in the book to standard jazz and pop songs of the era.
About the CD
The accompanying CD features many of the examples in the book-including 14 original tunesperformed
on solo piano. Listen to the CD to better understand each style and to practice your
own solo playing.

 

Early jazz had always been evolving on two simultaneous fronts-as a small ensemble
music, and as a solo piano music. By the mid 1930s, ensembles were changing. Jazz
bands were growing larger, into "big bands"-essentially, hybrids of the jazz combos and
larger dance bands of the '20s. Along with the transition from smaller to larger groups, a
"smoothing out" process took place in the music, and a distinctly new piano style emerged.
One crucial defining characteristic of swing* music is the evenness of all four beats played by the
rhythm section. The rhythm sections of the big bands used a bassist who usually played on all
four beats of the measure, laying down an even 4/4. This was different from the tuba or bass
players of older New Orleans style, who usually played on beats I and 3, with occasional walking
fills. The epitome of a swing rhythm section was Count Basie's band; they played all four beats
of each measure with such evenness and precision they sound like one person.
Swing pianists were caught between two worlds. Still rooted in the stride/ragtime model, they
began exploring new ways to establish the 4/4 pulse while freeing up the left hand. Swing demanded
a lighter touch and a looser feel; the driving accents of stride piano were ironed out.
Although the left hand still relied on an oom-pah striding motion, dynamic levels became more
consistent for bass notes and after-chords. So-called "walking bass" lines became commonplace.
The consummate swing pianist was Teddy Wilson (1912-1986). His playing represents the highest
cultivation of the pure swing style. Balance and restraint characterize his approach. Classically
trained, Wilson had a refined sense of touch. His technique was supple, and his music, subtle.
One reason for the lighter touch of the swing pianists was the use of the microphone; the earlier
jazz pianists had to pound on the piano to be heard within a group setting. Wilson gained notoriety
when he teamed up with clarinetist Benny Goodman and drummer Gene Krupa to form the
Benny Goodman Trio. This group was historically important not only for the great music they
created but also for being the first publicized interracial jazz performing group. The fact that this
trio had no bass player is a testament to Wilson's astounding left-hand technique and conception.
Wilson played solo piano in much the same way as he approached playing with a group.
*The term swing as used here refers to the style of jazz that evolved from the mid 1930s to the mid' 40s. It should not be confused
with the more general use of the word denoting the rhythmic conception associated with most jazz.
Left-Hand Techniques
Most of the left-hand techniques used by swing pianists were already used by the late stride players.
As with earlier styles, the left hand mostly kept time by playing the quarter-note pulse.
Crucial differences were that now all of the beats were played with equal stress, the touch was
much lighter, and the feeling was more relaxed. The hard-driving left hand of the stride pianists
was replaced by a steady, relaxed groove. There was also a difference in when and how often the
swing pianists applied each left-hand technique. These newer approaches are described in the following
pages.


CONTENTS

1 CLASSIC RAGTIME .
Scott Joplin

2 BLUES & BOOGIE WOOGIE
Jimmy Yancey & Pete Johnson

3 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ .
Jelly Roll Morton

4 STRIDE PIANO I.
James P. Johnson

5 STRIDE PIANO II.
Fats Waller

6 SWING PIANO I .
Teddy Wilson

7 SWING PIANO II .
Art Tatum

Price: €18,99
€18,99

SMOOTH JAZZ PIANO CD HAL LEONARD KEYBOARD comping soloing scales chords harmony voicings

SMOOTH JAZZ PIANO. CD

Keyboard Style Series
Series: keyboard instruction
Medium: Softcover with CD
Author: Mark Harrison
Artist: Various

This comprehensive book and CD package will teach you the basic skills you need to play smooth jazz piano. From comping to soloing, you'll learn the theory, the tools, and the tricks used by the pros. The accompanying CD features many of the examples in the book performed either solo or with a full band. Specifically, you'll learn: scales and chords, harmony and voicings, progressions and comping, rhythmic concepts, melodies and soloing, characteristic stylings, the history of jazz, and more. THE HAL LEONARD KEYBOARD STYLE SERIES provides focused lessons that contain valuable how-to insight, essential playing tips, and beneficial information for all players. Comprehensive treatment is given to each subject, complete with a companion CD. 80 pages

Price: €18,99
€18,99

HILAND JOHNNY LICKS & TRICKS VOL.2 LIBRO CD TABLATURE CHITARRA COUNTRY B-BENDER

HILAND JOHNNY, LICKS & TRICKS VOL.2. CD TAB.

Product Description:
Recorded lessons from one of America's greatest guitarists Johnny Hiland teaches essential Licks and Tricks every great country player should know. Lessons in standard notation and TAB with complete audio instruction.

Song Title:
B-Bender Chord Licks
B-Bender Licks
B-Bender Licks Without Using The B-Bender
Bending Behind The Nut
The Funky Chicken Lick
The Tractor Trailer Lick
Train Whistle Lick

Price: €23,99
€23,99

HILAND JOHNNY LICKS & TRICKS VOL.1 LIBRO CD TABLATURE CHITARRA COUNTRY

HILAND JOHNNY, LICKS & TRICKS VOL.1. CD TAB.

Product Description:
Recorded lessons from one of America's greatest guitarists Johnny Hiland teaches essential Licks and Tricks every great Blues and Rock player should know. Lessons in standard notation and TAB with complete audio instruction.

Song Title: Composer/Source:
Bending Blues Licks Johnny Hiland
Blues Rhythm Pattern Johnny Hiland
Classic Blues Licks Johnny Hiland
Heavy Metal Style Harmonics Johnny Hiland
Pick-Hand Finger Tapping Johnny Hiland
Slide Licks in Standard Tuning Johnny Hiland
Slide/Rhythm Licks in Open G Tuning Johnny Hiland

Price: €24,99
€24,99

THE ROOTS OF JAZZ, The songs and licks that made it happen. Fred Sokolow. CD TABLATURE

THE ROOTS OF JAZZ. CD TABLATURE
The songs and licks that made it happen. 

Dinah
East Of The Sun (And West Of The Moon)
Honeysuckle Rose
I'll Remember April
Rose Room
Yesterdays

The Roots of Jazz Guitar
Series: Guitar Collection
Format: Softcover with CD - TAB
Composer: Fred Sokolow
Inventory #HL 00699082
ISBN: 9780793577347
UPC: 073999990829
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
64 pages

A complete survey of jazz guitar, its pioneers and how it developed. Includes: six note-for-note transcriptions of famous standards pivotal to the genre; instruction in the essential playing styles; the history and development of jazz guitar; biographies of the pioneering artists; a recording of the songs, exercises, and licks; and more.

Songs include:

- Dinah (Eddie Lang)

- East of the Sun (And West of the Moon) (Barney Kessel)

- Honeysuckle Rose (Charlie Christian)

- I'll Remember April (George Van Eps)

- Rose Room (Django Reinhardt)

- Yesterdays (Wes Montgomery).

64 pages.

 

MUSCAL INTRODUCTION
A LOOK AT THE ROOTS OF JAZZ GUITAR
At the beginning of the twentieth century, New Orleans bands began combining two traditions: They
borrowed some repertoire from European bands, which often included strings, horns, and a piano,
and performed classical pieces, polkas, mazurkas, sentimental ballads and waltzes. They also imitated
Southern string bands, sometimes called "spasm bands," which consisted of guitars, banjos, violins,
mandolins and string bass, and who played ragtime, blues, jigs and reels. New Orleans bandleaders
like Buddy Bolden and Kid Ory used all these instruments and fused the musical styles, and
their music began to be identified as "jazz."
Johnny St. Cyr, who played with Kid Ory, Jelly Roll Morton and many of the New Orleans bands,
was typical of the first jazz guitarists: he was a four-string banjo player who played guitar as a sideline.
Seldom soloing, he strummed four-beats-to-the-bar and provided bands with a rhythmic backbone.
In pre-microphone days, banjo was audible over loud horns; guitar did not cut it. But in the
'20s, as phonograph recordings gained popularity, the guitar became more prominent. It was easier
to record than banjo.

HOT JAZZ: GUITARIN THE '20s
Jazz was the hot popular dance music of the decade that is often called "The Jazz Age."
Accomplished pickers like Roy Smeck, Nick Lucas and Lonnie Johnson performed the first melodic
guitar solos on records in the 1920s. These versatile players played popular tunes, blues and
whatever the traffic would bear, sometimes fingerpicking but usually flatpicking scales, chords and
arpeggios. But most performing guitarists in jazz bands simply strummed chords, until Eddie Lang
came along.
Lang performed with many of the popular ensembles of his day, including the Goldkette Orchestra,
Red Nichols and the Five Pennies, Paul Whiteman and Bing Crosby. One of the first studio guitar
aces, he accompanied most of the stars of his era on records. Live and in the studio, Lang combined
rhythmic strumming with a melodic soloing style, opening up new possibilities for a whole generation
of guitarists. When he died, in 1933, he left a recorded legacy of ensemble work, solos and duets
with Lonnie Johnson and with lifelong musical companion, violinist Joe Venuti. He inspired countless
jazz banjoists to play guitar, and to be melodic as well as rhythmic. The guitar became a soloing
voice in jazz.

THE '30s SWING ERA
During the swing or big-band era, guitarists in popular swing orchestras played rhythm. Count
Basie's guitarist, Freddie Greene, never played a solo. Some guitarists like Carl Kress, Dick
McDonough, George Van Eps and George Barnes followed Eddie Lang's lead and created beautiful,
harmonically rich, chord-based soloing styles. They recorded solos, duets and small ensemble "listening"
(not dancing) records for jazz afficionados. Like Lang, they usually played Gibson L-5 archtop guitars.
Meanwhile, inspired players like Snoozer Quinn, Teddy Bunn and Oscar Aleman (who played an allmetal
National guitar) helped develop the art of single-note jazz soloing throughout the '30s. But the
creative genius who caught most listeners' and players' ears was the Belgian gypsy, Django Reinhardt.
The first international jazz star, Reinhardt rose to fame playing with his "quintette" in Paris. Although
his own style and his duets with violinist Stephane Grappelli were admittedly based on the
LangNenuti model, he took single-note guitar soloing to new heights. His ad-lib improvisations were
fiery, tender, incredibly inventive, and he always swung. Budding country, blues and jazz guitarists
memorized his solos.
 

DINAH, EDDIE LANG

Born into a musical Italian family October 25, 1902 in Philadelphia, Salvatore Massaro studied violin
and music theory at age seven. By his teens he was playing four- and six-string banjo in pop
orchestras, often with his boyhood friend, violinist Joe Venuti. Venuti claims Lang was self-taught,
and the only guitarist he recalls Lang mentioning as an inspiration was Segovia. When asked who
Lang imitated, Venuti said "Who else was there? Eddie started it all."
In 1924, using the name of boyhood baseball hero Eddie Lang, he joined the Mound City Blue
Blowers, a sort of jug band, as a guitarist. The recordings he made with them demonstrate why
Lang is said to have legitimized guitar as a jazz instrument: instead of simply strumming the chords,
he played several chords per measure, and peppered his backup with bass runs, passing tones,
arpeggios, single-string fills, bluesy string-bending and harmonics.
In the next several years, Lang was increasingly in demand as a performer. He played with the big
bands of Jean Goldkette (where he befriended Bix Beiderbecke), Roger Kahn, Adrian Rollini, and
Paul Whiteman. Although he was capable of reading music, Lang played by ear. During his tenure
with Whiteman, he kept a piece of paper the size of a business card in his pocket that contained on
it (in markings only decipherable by Lang) everything he needed to know about Whiteman's musical
repertoire. When Whiteman's singer, Bing Crosby, went solo, Lang became Crosby's guitarist and
appeared with him in the 1932 film, The Big Broadcast.
One of the first versatile studio guitarists, Lang recorded with Red Nichols and His Five Pennies,
Cliff Edwards (known as Ukulele Ike), AI Jolson, Ruth Etting, Sophie Tucker, the Boswell Sisters,
Emmett Miller and a host of blues singers, including Bessie Smith, Victoria Spivey and Texas
Alexander. His technique was most audible when he recorded solo (often composing his own
songs), and in duets with Joe Venuti or with small ensembles such as Venuti's Blue Four or Blue
Five. These were probably the first listening (not dancing) jazz recordings. Using the name "Blind
Willie Dunn," he recorded memorable duets with guitarist Lonnie Johnson, the other guitar giant of
the '20s, who, like Lang, played both blues and jazz.
By 1933, when Lang died of complications from a tonsillectomy, most jazz bands had switched from
banjo to guitar, and most guitarists were playing the archtop, F-hole instrument Lang preferred.
Using blues and classical techniques, he inspired the first generation of jazz guitarists, most of
whom agree: Lang laid the groundwork for jazz guitar.

PERFORMANCE NOTES
"Dinah" features Lang's backup and lead styles. It has a typical pop song structure, and in 1928 Joe
Venuti's Blue Four, recording for Okeh Records in New York City, gave it the usual jazz treatment
(see as follows). Released in Europe by Parlaphone, it was one of the "chamber jazz" sides that
made Venuti and Lang internationally famous. The quartet consisted of Venuti, Lang, a pianist and
baritone sax.

SONG STRUCTURE AND THE JAZZ TREATMENT
Like many pop tunes, "Dinah" has an AABA structure:
• An eight-bar section ("A part") is played twice in a row, with a slightly different ending the second time.
• An eight-bar bridge follows (that's "B").
• The "A part" is repeated.
 

Price: €16,99
€16,99

HOT CLUB SESSION BASIC ACOUSTIC SWING JAZZ GUITAR Felix Schell LIBRO CD TABLATURE

HOT CLUB SESSION BASIC ACOUSTIC SWING JAZZ GUITAR. F. Schell. 7 Pezzi completi, e 5 basi complete, arpeggios, scales, symetrical scales, melodic embellishments. CD TAB.

Product Description:
Finally, a great method which will show you how to play the acoustic jazz guitar in the style of players like Django Reinhardt, Oscar Alleman and Eddie Lang - their style is characterized by a powerful rhythm guitar and a vital swinging single-note solo line. Due to the fact that it can be very hard to master the original transcriptions, this book simplifies this style without losing the essence of the original sound. Written in standard notation and TAB, the material can be played by students and players that master the easy to intermediate level on plectrum style jazz guitar. All titles are included on CD, as well as some play along tracks which offer a great possibility to improvise on typical gypsy chord changes and rhythms.

Format: Book/CD Set

Song Title: Composer/Source:

Arpeggios
Blues of the Gypsys Felix Schell
Chromatic Line Felix Schell
Dark Eyes Felix Schell
Improvisation
Le Reve Felix Schell
Major & Minor Scales
Melodic Embellishments
Minor Stomp (1) Felix Schell
Minor Stomp (2) Felix Schell
One Note Rhythm (1) Felix Schell
One Note Rhythm (2) Felix Schell
One Note Rhythm (3) Felix Schell
Special Effects
Symmetrical Scales
Waltz for Django Felix Schell

Price: €18,99
€18,99

BLUES & ROCK HARMONICA GLENN WEISER LIBRO CD BASI PENTATONICA IMPROVVISAZIONE

BLUES & ROCK HARMONICA, G. Weiser. CD

Series: Harmonica
Publisher: Centerstream Publications
Medium: Softcover with CD
Artist: Glenn Weiser

By Glenn Weiser Book/CD package for beginners to learn blues and rock improvisation. Includes explanations of scales, modes, chords & other essential elements of music. The 60-minute CD features riffs & solos plus demonstrations and a blues jam to play along with. Goin' Down The Road. 96 pages.

Price: €24,99
€24,99
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