TRASCRIZIONE

JAZZ LICKS ENCYCLOPEDIA Jody Fisher BOOK CD GUITAR TABLATURE VOICING-IMPROVISATION

JAZZ LICKS ENCYCLOPEDIA. 280 frasi. CD TABLATURE

LIBRO CON CD E TABLATURE

By Jody Fisher
ITEM: 00-19420
UPC: 038081184524
ISBN 10: 0739011189
ISBN 13: 9780739011188
CATEGORY: Guitar Method or Supplement
FORMAT: Book & CD

Nearly 300 useful jazz guitar licks organized by chord type. Examples are shown in easy-to-read TAB and standard music notation. Four voicings are given for each chord type along with easy-to-read chord diagrams. Licks for common progressions such as ii-V-I are shown. Includes sections on Important Scales for Improvisation, Articulation, "Feel" and other important topics.

GUITAR
OVER 280 USEFUL JAZZ GUITAR LlCKS

- Organized by chord type
- Four voicings given for each chord type with easy-to-read chord diagrams
- Examples in TAB and standard music notation
- Includes sections on important scales for improvisation, articulation, "feel" and other important topics
- Licks for common progressions such as ii-V-I
JODY FISHER
 

CONTENTS:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
INTRODUCTION
PART I: LICKS FOR CHORDS

MAJOR 6 CHORDS (MAJOR 13 CHORDS)
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for 6 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for 6 Chords

MAJOR 7 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for Maj7 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for Maj7 Chords

MAJOR 9 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for Maj9 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for Maj9 Chords

MINOR 6 CHORDS (MINOR 13 CHORDS)
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for min6 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for min6 Chords

MINOR 7 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for min7 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for min 7 Chords

MINOR 9 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for min9 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for min9 Chords

MINOR I I CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for Min I I Chords
Two-Bar Licks for Min I I Chords

DOMINANT 7 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for 7 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for 7 Chords

DOMINANT 9 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for 9 Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for 9 Chords .

DOMINANT II CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for I I Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for I I Chords .

DOMINANT 13 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for I 3 Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for I 3 Chords .

DOMINANT 7b5 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for 7b5 Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for 7b5 Chords .

DOMINANT 7#5 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for 7#5 Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for 7#5 Chords .

DOMINANT 7b9 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for 7b9 Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for 7b9 Chords .

DOMINANT 7#9 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for 7#9 Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for 7#9 Chords .

DOMINANT 7b5b9 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for 7b5b9 Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for 7b5b9 Chords .

DOMINANT 7#5#9 CHORDS .
Chord Formula & Voicings .
One-Bar Licks for 7#5#9Chords .
Two-Bar Licks for 7#5#9Chords .

DOMINANT 7b5#9 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for 7b5#9 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for 7b5#9 Chords

DOMINANT 7#5b9 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for 7#5b9 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for 7#5b9 Chords

MAJOR 7#5 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for Maj7#5 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for Maj7#5 Chords

MAJOR 7#11 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for Maj7#11 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for Maj7#11 Chords

DOMINANT 9#11 CHORDS
Chord Formula & Voicings
One-Bar Licks for 9#11 Chords
Two-Bar Licks for 9#11 Chords

PART 2: LICKS FOR PROGRESSIONS

ii-V7 -I
Example Progressions i
Two-Bar Licks for ii-V7-I i
Four-Bar Licks for ii-V7-I.. i

MINOR ii- V7-i
Example Progressions j
Two-Bar Licks for ii-V7 -i
Four-Bar Licks for ii-V7 -i

ii- V7-1- VI7
Example Progressions
Two-Bar Licks for ii-V7 -I -VI7
Four-Bar Licks for ii-V7 -1-VI7

iii- VI7-11- V7 S
Example Progressions
Two-Bar Licks for iii-VI7 -ii-V7
Four-Bar Licks for iii-VI7 -ii-V7

III7- VI7-117- V7
Example Progressions
Two-Bar Licks for III7- VI7-II7-V7
Four-Bar Licks for III7-VI7-II7-V7

CHROMATIC PROGRESSIONS
Example Progressions
Two-Bar Licks for Chromatic Progressions
Four-Bar Licks for Chromatic Progressions

APPENDIX
Articulation and "Feeling"
Revamping Licks
Rhythmic Displacement
Important Scales for Improvisation

The CD that accompanies this book can make learning with the book
easier and more enjoyable. The symbol shown above will appear next to
every example that is on the CD. Use the CD to help insure that you are
capturing the feel of the examples, interpreting the rhythms correctly, and
so on. The track numbers below the symbols correspond directly to the
examples on that page. Track I will help you tune your guitar to this CD.


Introduction
There are many factors that go into a good jazz solo. Understanding music theory, along with the
ability to execute numerous scales, patterns and arpeggios, is just part of the picture. You must also
develop a sense of melody. Jazz students go about this by spending quite a bit of time studying the
improvised solos of others-specifically, "lifting" nice melodic ideas for use in their own solos, or at
least to influence their own playing in some way. These short melodic ideas become their "licks." This is perfectly acceptable.
In the long run, everything you have studied and listened to blends together to become your "sound:'
Problems arise when a player uses licks as the only tool for creating solos. Stringing an assortment of licks together is not improvising. Improvising is expressing the moment with spontaneously created ideas (as much as possible). Most of these ideas are based on things you have already learned, studied and heard.
Ideally,when improvising, we are combining these things in new and exciting ways. So, it makes sense to expose yourself to a lot of nice melodies. Learning a variety of tunes will help and so will learning licks-the ones you transcribe from recordings and the ones you get from books like this one.
This book has two main sections. The first part deals with licks that will work over specific chords.
Most types of chords are represented. For each type of chord, you will be shown the chord formula (as derived from a scale) and four sample voicings. In this section, there are four one-measure licks and six two-measure licks that will work well over the chord. When you find a melodic idea you like, memorize
it and learn to play it in all keys. Then practice inserting the idea into your own solos. Always look
for ways to vary the lick and make it your own.
The second section deals with licks that work over entire chord progressions. Many of the most common progressions are shown with longer melodic ideas. You will find two- and four-measure licks. Once again, when you find one you like, memorize it, transpose it and then start using it (or pieces of it, anyway).
At the end there is a short Appendix. In this section, you'll find ideas to help you get more mileage out of the licks you have learned. There is also a list of scales from which most of the licks in this book were mined. Eventually, you should know these scales in a few different fingerings.
The idea is to develop a strong musical vocabulary. Think of a scale as an "alphabet." Licks are some of the "words" you can create using that alphabet. Learning licks can help you to understand the scales you are studying by showing you some of the musical sentence possibilities.
I hope the examples in this book will open a few melodic doors for you!

NOTE:
All of the eighth notes in this book are swing Bths (played unevenly, long-short). However, it's always a good idea to try playing musical ideas straight, too. Experiment. On the CD that is available for this book, they are played as swing 8ths. 

Prezzo: €23,99
€23,99

HENDERSON SCOTT THE BEST Guitar & Bass TABLATURE LIBRO SPARTITI-Black Cherry-Jakarta-Root Food

HENDERSON SCOTT, THE BEST. GUITAR TABLATURE

LIBRO DI MUSICA ROCK - JAZZ, FUSION.
SPARTITI PER CHITARRA, BASSO E SYNTH.
ACCORDI, PENTAGRAMMA E TABLATURE

CHITARRA: TABLATURE
BASSO: PENTAGRAMMA.
SINTH: PENTAGRAMMA.

TITOLI: 

- Black Cherry

- Jakarta

- Revenge Stew

- Root Food

- Slidin' Into Charlisa

- Stella By Infra

- Red High Particle Neutron Beam

- Susie's Dingsbums

-The Crawling Horror

-Torque

- Worlds Waiting.

 

Chitarra TABLATURE, Basso (no Tab.). 

Prezzo: €59,99
€59,99

JAZZ GUITAR FAVORITES LIBRO CD TABLATURE CHITARRA-All The Things You Are-Hank Garland-KESSEL

JAZZ GUITAR FAVORITES. CD TABLATURE

LIBRO DI MUSICA, SPARTITI PER CHITARRA CON CD E TABLATURE. 

 

6 titoli:

-All The Things You Are, Hank Garland

-I Hear A Rhapsody, Howard Roberts

-Oleo, Pat Martino

-Speak Low, Barney Kessel

-When Sunny Gets Blue, George Barnes

-Yesterdays, Wes Montgomery
 

Series: Guitar Collection
Medium: Softcover with CD
Arranger: Jack Grassel

Guitar transcriptions for these standards: All The Things You Are/Hank Garland - I Hear a Rhapsody/Howard Roberts - Oleo/Pat Martino - Speak Low/Barney Kessel - When Sunny Gets Blue/George Barnes - Yesterdays/Wes Montgomery.
40 pages

Table of contents :
All The Things You Are
I Hear A Rhapsody
Oleo
Speak Low
When Sunny Gets Blue
Yesterdays

 

INTRODUCTION

This publication represents a new format in jazz education which allows the learning improvisor and professional to access the benefits of studying classic guitar solos. Most transcription books require that the recordings (if available) be searched out, purchased, and only listened to since most players in the developmental stages of their playing would not have the technique to play the solos up to tempo. The solos in this book are:

1. Played in tune; many old recordings have been sped up to improve fidelity, raising the pitch as much as a whole step.

2. Recorded at an easy-to-play slow practice tempo.

3. Also recorded at a fast tempo slightly slower than the original, making performance attainable sooner.

4. Recorded on modern equipment with fidelity surpassing the original recordings with a modern rhythm section. Bass and drums are monophonic on both channels. Piano is on the right only. Guitar is on the left only.With your "balance control" you can choose what you want to hear. The solos are arranged in progressive order of technical difficulty.We chose performances that are most representative of each master's contribution to the development of jazz guitar.

Barney Kessel: This solo demonstrates his use of hard-driving melodic development and some of the first string bending on record by a jazz artist.

Wes Montgomery: The tone of the jazz guitar was forever changed by this man's thumb while adding to the post-bop vocabulary.

Howard Roberts: This early solo displays his formidable jazz talent which became unavailable to the public as Howard persued his pop hits, studio work and teaching careers in the late sixties.

Hank Garland: This Country-Western studio player shocked the jazz world in the early sixties with
his incredible jazz technique and swinging melodies.

George Barnes: With the use of almost every technique known to man, George uses bending, slides,
and hammer-ons to create a high level of expression seldom heard on the guitar.

Pat Martino: This solo is from the seventies after Pat had left his Wes Montgomery-influenced early
playing and developed his present polytonal-chromaticism, which is much different than the traditional jazz guitar approach.

The final form you see here is the result of an entire year of work; researching and choosing great solos, transcribing and proofreading for accuracy, countless hours of practicing and recording. Our motive is to increase the quality of jazz guitar playing and to preserve music which is or may become "out of print." Jeff Schroedl at Hal Leonard was a big help in developing and improving the book.

Up until starting this project I had avoided playing other's solos thinking that my own unique style of playing would be compromised. After spending a year with these masters, I've noticed that I have retained my original conception of guitar music, but have acquired a technical depth and more tools to play my music my way. So I now recommend this study to any jazz guitarist at any level.
Special thanks to the fine rhythm section who did their homework: Jim Sodke-keys, Del Bennett-drums, Tom McGirr-bass, and also Bill Littlefield-recording engineer.

Prezzo: €24,99
€24,99

AL DI MEOLA MUSIC WORD PICTURES Artist Transcriptions LIBRO Guitar TABLATURE CHITARRA PACO

DI MEOLA AL, MUSIC, WORD, PICTURES. TABLATURE

LIBRO DI MUSICA LATIN-JAZZ.

SPARTITI PER BASSO E CHITARRA .

ACCORDI E PENTAGRAMMA.

 

Series: Transcribed
Artist: Al Di Meola

A collection of Al's greatest, complete with biography, discography, and complete description of Al's special techniques. 144 pages.

 

AL DI MEOLA

EDITORIAL NOTES
The music in this book contains transcriptions taken directly from scores and recordings of Al Di Meola. The transcriptions include the guitar lines, bass lines, and chord progressions. The tunes were chosen by Al himself, and although he would have wished to have included more music, this was impossible due to space limitation. Unfortunately, it does not contain all of AI's lengthly solo breaks written out again due to space limitation. Each tune consists of the main thematic sections fully written out, with the solo break sections being indicated by showing the basic background" riff," with repeats included.
The order of the music, as it appears in this book, has nothing to do with the level of difficulty of the music, but rather the ordet shows the chronological progression of AI's music from his first solo album to his most recent one.

Al plays most of his music very up tempo, and it sounds incredibly hard to play. But one very important discovery I made while we worked on transcribing the music to print was that once you see the music written out, it is not very hard to read. Just work on the following practice suggestions, as well as those Al gives in the section of this book entitled "Technical Talk". An added help would be to use "AI Di Meola's Picking Techniques" book available.

As everyone knows, the main elements in AI's guitar playing are speed and accuracy. Al suggests that anyone attempting to play his music practice it slowly with accuracy in both the left and right hands, and you will in time be able to play his music. In addition, the main musical element in AI's writing is the use of scales in both his thematic and solo break structures. AI's suggestion is to study the scales in all positions as an aid. Addressing yourself to these above mentioned elements of AI's playing and writing styles will help you tremendously not only in playing AI's music, but also in the writing and playing of your own music, as the elements of speed, accuracy, and scale work will broaden your musical creativity.
It is important to note that the playing positions and fingerings contained in these transcriptions are the choosing of the editor, and are not necessarily those that Al uses himself. They are those that seem most comfortable to me.
You should feel free to play the music in any position you feel comfortable with. As Al has stated many times, you should know your fretboard so well that you can play the given music in any position feasible. But for those of you who don't know your fretboard well, I felt it necessary to include one way you could play these tunes.
You should also note that the bass lines contain no fingerings or position markings, since I felt it better to leave it up to the player. Of course, keyboard players can use both lines, or play the chord changes along with the guitar line.
I do hope that you get many things from this book, but most of all I hope you have fun and enjoy it.
Music Editor

 

... Do you have any suggestions for how to learn these things?
I would recommend books that show the positions and ways to play them. Check out Berklee's books (Berklee Press Publications), because I know their advanced stuff to be very good; it's probably the same with their beginning books, too. I would suggest starting your scale education with the major and minor scales, and,after that, diminished, augmented, and whole-tone. Then, depending on what kind of music you ant to play, the modes should be learned. My theory about this kind of thing is that you should never stop learning.
Once you've got it you can play whatever you want, and your playing will sound more advanced, thus achieving a better understanding of the instrument.

How does this apply to the way you play now?
ell, now I know where to play on the instrument and what to do to get the sound I want. And because it comes o easily, I can play more in terms of feelings. You can spend a lifetime playing with the "thinking" process of hat scale to put against what chord. If you were to analyze my playing, you would find elements of the phrygian, dorian, mixolydian, and locrian modes etc.


Would you describe your left-hand technique?
My left.hand position is one from which all four fingers have easy access to the fingerboard. It doesn't vary much from that, because it is natural for me to use all four fingers to play my ideas. I really find it frustrating to see so man rock players using just the first and third fingers. It isn't necessarily wrong, but it is impossible for almost an one to play any kind of scale with and fluidity.


What about your picking style?
It is just normal alternating picking. Because I was taught that way from the beginning, it is very natural for me, and I really don't think about it. Sometimes I have my wrist on the bridge, and sometimes it is free-floating. And although my pick hits the string flat most of the time, it will change, depending on what sound I want.


How do you come up with the rhythms in your playing?
I guess they come from a love of drumming and Latin music. My involvement with Return To Forever also helped. Unlike a lot of electric guitarists, who play mostly lagato, I tend toward playing rhythms like a drummer or percussionist would. I try to incorporate both rhythmic, percussive lines with the more legato phrasings. A lot of the trickiness of many of my scale runs is involved with the rhythms and where the accents fall.


How do you work on these tricky runs?
It depends, because sometimes one apparently tricky passage will flow really easily, while another passage will be alot more difficult. I'll then have to sit down and work out the fingering. I usually find it best to work on passages at a slow tempo with correct rhythm.


Is there a good way to work on alternate picking?
I would suggest picking three or four notes, and working on those. Too often, players who are trying to improve their right-hand dexterity get hung up by trying to play too many notes in the left hand. I hear a lot of players running whole scales from the sixth string to the first and playing them really sloppy. So, I say to make it very basic, ing only a few notes and play slowly with perfect rhythm in time. That, in itself, is a task.


Do you work on your own picking very much now?
ell, I want to get even better. There are a lot of lines in my music that are tricky for the right hand, and I only know that I've really got it when I don't have to think about it at all. I find that going over these runs before a performance serves as a good warm-up also. I practice tricky things with skips and jumps in them, but it's always omething that I am going to be playing in the music. One thing that makes some lines tricky is their rhythm. When I'm playing something very rhythmic, I use my left and right hands to enhance different parts of the passage. For example, I mute strings a lot.


How did muting become a part of your playing technique?
It was actually very natural. When I first started taking guitar lessons, I was very self-conscious in just playing around other people. I never really wanted anyone to hear what I was doing, because I was very conscious of their pace, too. I never wanted to have people say, "What's that noise?" In those days, electric guitar was not accepted like it is today. I was very shy, so I started muting the strings with my hand to cover up the volume. Years later, I ould mute the strings as a musical effect, but only then did I realize that it had become a part of my style. ...

 

TITOLI:
Al Di's Dream Theme FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Casino FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Dinner Music Of The Gods FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Egyptian Danza FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Electric Rendezvous FOR 2 GUITARS AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Elegant Gypsy Suite FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Lady Of Rome, Sister Of Brazil FOR 2 GUITARS  - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Land Of The Midnight Sun FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Midnight Tango FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Morning Fire FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Race W/Devil On Spanish Highway FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE
Ritmo De La Noche FOR GUITAR AND BASS - SOLO IN PENTAGRAMMA, SENZA TABLATURE

Passion, Grace & Fire, con 2 TABLATURE, della chitarra di PACO de LUCIA e di AL DI MEOLA

Prezzo: €21,99
€21,99

DI MEOLA AL ELEGANT GYPSY GUITAR TABLATURE MEDITERRANEAN SUNDANCE CHITARRA LIBRO SPARTITI

DI MEOLA AL, ELEGANT GYPSY. SHEET MUSIC BOOK WITH GUITAR TABLATURE .

LIBRO DI MUSICA JAZZ FUSION.

SPARTITI PER CHITARRA : 

ACCORDI, PENTAGRAMMA, TABLATURE. 

 

Studio Album Recorded : December 1976 - January 1977 .
Released : April 1977 .

 

TITOLI : 

1 - Flight Over Rio
2 - Midnight Tango
3 - Mediterranean Sundance
4 - Race with Devil on Spanish Highway
5 - Lady of Rome, Sister of Brazil
6 - Elegant Gypsy Suite

 

MUSICIANS: 

Al Di Meola: Electric guitars, acoustic guitars, piano, synthesizer, percussion.
Paco de Lucía: Acoustic guitar (track 3).
Anthony Jackson: Bass guitar (tracks 1, 2, 4, 6).
Jan Hammer: Keyboards, synthesizer (tracks 1, 6).
Barry Miles: Piano, keyboards, synthesizer (tracks 2, 4).
Steve Gadd: Drums (tracks 1, 6).
Lenny White: Drums (tracks 2, 4).
Mingo Lewis: Congas, synthesizers, organ, percussion

Prezzo: €99,99
€99,99

DI MEOLA AL McLAUGHLIN PACO DE LUCIA FRIDAY NIGHT SAN FRANCISCO-Mediterranean Sundance-BOOK

DI MEOLA AL, JOHN McLAUGHLIN, PACO DE LUCIA, FRIDAY NIGHT IN SAN FRANCISCO.

LIBRO DI MUSICA JAZZ, FUSION,
SPARTITI PER CHITARRA CON PENTAGRAMMA E ACCORDI. 
TRASCRIZIONE DI OGNI CHITARRA.

Questo irripetibile concerto del 5 dicembre 1980, ha aperto le strade al genere spanish-jazz-acustico.

LIBRO DI MUSICA JAZZ FUSION, TRASCRITTO da AL DI MEOLA !

SPARTITI PER 2 E 3 CHITARRE CON:

ACCORDI E PENTAGRAMMA.

DISCO PIù FAMOSO DEL TRIO CHITARRISTICO PATRONIMICO ( Di, Mc, De ) .  

 

Al Di Meola, Paco De Lucia: Mediterranean Sundance/Rio Ancho;
Al Di Meola, John McLaughlin: Short Tales Of The Black Forest;
Paco De Lucia, John McLaughlin: Frevo Rasgado;
Al Di Meola, Paco De Lucia, John McLaughlin: Fantasia Suite; Paco De Lucia, Al Di Meola, John McLaughlin: Guardian Angel.

Trascrizione di ogni chitarra.

 

Al Di Meola, John McLaughlin and Paco DeLucia - Friday Night in San Francisco

Artist Transcriptions
Series: Guitar Book
Artist: Al Di Meola
Artist: John McLaughlin
Artist: Paco Delucia

This famous trio of acoustic guitarists is captured live in this matching folio to the Grammy Award-winning album from a live concert in San Francisco. The book contains full transcriptions of every tune including: Short Tales of the Black Forest - Mediterranean Sundance/Rio Ancho - Fantasia Suite - and more.
Inventory #HL 00660115
ISBN: 9780793512461
UPC: 073999601152
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
96 pages


Series: Guitar Book
Artist: Al Di Meola
Artist: John McLaughlin
Artist: Paco Delucia
Artist Transcriptions 21st Century Publications

"Latin rhythms are the most interesting rhythms in the world," opines Al Di Meola, "and to write them you have to be able to play them." And Di Meola can certainly play them. The master altenate-picker and fusion pioneer has carried on a multi-decade love affair with the music of Spain and Central and South America while simultaneously leaving his imprint on the jazz and rock worlds. His two latest releases are The Guitar Trio with Paco de Lucia and John McLaughlin, and Di Meola Plays Piazzolla, a tribute to the great Argentinean tango composer Astor Piazzolla. Both albums are rich in Latin influences, and Di Meola has devoted his musical life to absorbing the subtle stylistic nuances of the various genres within his own playing. "Almost everything I do I kind of analyze to be some kind of percussion or drum pattern," says Di Meola. "I'm particularly interested in what's known as the 'clavé' rhythm. That's essential in Latin music, and some people just can't do it. But you'll hear Latin musicians say, 'Oh, he plays good clavé.' clavé is sometimes referred to as a rhythm, hut mostly in salsa music. When you play against the clavé, you're playing against the time, and that's what I do a lot when 1 play rhythmically on a guitar. We refer to clavé as the quarter note." A great example of this can be found in Di Meola's song "Beyond The Mirage," from The Guitar Trio (see Ex. 1). The opening arpeggios are composed in a classic clavé rhythm. "All three guitars tune the 6th string down to a low D," says Di Meola. "I use a little bit of my Roland GR synth in there, so you can hear that real low tone of a fretless bass sound." 

The picking pattern is not strictly alternating, but designed to fit over the specific string spread. Di Meola composed the picking pattern as much as the notes themselves. You must perform the pick strokes a certain way to achieve the proper ,"hythm. "The first note you hit is on the 6th string, the second note is on the high E string, the third on the D string, and so on," explains Di Meola. "So there's a lot of skipping around. It's down, up, down, up, up, up. But you have to do it this way or the rhythm won't sound just right. And if it's off a hair, the feel is ruined."
At this brisk tempo (q=200), it's quite a challenge to execute pattens accurately. But that's not the most difficult aspect of the passage, according to Di Meola: "It's more the rhythm that's going to mess people up. And what people need to get into is experimenting more with different rhythms, and keeping all of that locked into the clavé time." The rhythm and the placement of the accents brings to mind anothe," Latin-jazz standard, "Spain," by Chick Corea. "The whole thing in 'Spain' is the way those accents fall," says Di Meola. "It's off of the clavé without the clavé moving that will determine whether it's working or not. What 1love about Chick is that he writes and plays with so much clavé. I'm really drawn to his ability to use that in composition and playing." As a fitting homage to Corea-who helped launch Di Meola's career by hiring ti,e teenage,' to play in his band Return To Forever -Paco, John, and Al perform "Spain" as an encore. Note how close the rhythm and accents are in the opening of "Spain" to Di Meola's own tune. The difference is that "Spain" is melodic and "Mirage" is rhythmic. Both carry the clavé rhythm within their notes, and both capture the essence of Latin music. "The important tiling is the rhythm," stresses Di Meola. "Withont that you have nothing. Whether it's 'Spain' or 'Beyond The Mirage' or whatever, the rhythm is everything."

 

 

 Quando nella seconda metà degli anni '70 comparve il primo album dal titolo "Land Of The Midnight Sun", di un giovane chitarrista il cui particolarissimo stile esecutivo era stato già notato sulle produzioni di Chick Corea "No Mytery" e "Romantic Warrior", si ebbe occasione di ascoltarlo esterefatto in cuffia in un negozio di dischi. Il disco avrebbe fatto furore tra gli "insiders" dell'epoca; i giovani cultural-rampanti di allora ascoltavano jazz-rock, fusion, Zappa e art-rock sul tipo dei "Gentle Giant". I successori del chitarrista di Chick Corea potevano solo sognare di una carriera incredibile come quella che iniziò allora AI Di Meola: mentre oggi Scott Henderson e Frank Gambale suonano in piccoli Clubs, AI Di Meola riempiva già allora grosse sale, senza problemi. La sua seconda produzione, "Elegant Gypsy" fu votata jazz-album dell'anno nella classifica di Guitar Player e AI Di Meola stesso salì sul trono di migliore chitarrista jazz dell'anno. Tutti i suoi dischi di quel tempo hanno sufficiente fuoco ritmico, ma, almeno allora, AI Di Meola sembrava evitare come il diavolo l'acqua santa, shuffle, swing e tutto quello che avesse a che fare con grooves a terzine. "Mediterranean Sundance", un duetto col gigante del flamenco Paco De Lucia, è stato pubblicato su "Elegant Gypsy".Nella notazione di questa rubrica si trova la parte di Al Di Meola, dal tema fino alla fine del suo assolo; qui c'è dentro tutto ciò che mandava in pappa il cervello dei giovani chitarristi (aspiranti e non) di oltre 16 anni fa. Ancora oggi ci sorprende la velocità e la precisione tecnica per quanto riguarda la scelta del suono ed il fraseggio; l'entusiasmo è un po' diminuito. Praticamente tutto il brano è composto solo da note in MI- naturale; in alcuni punti spunta un RE# sul MI- armonico. Le salve di staccato tipiche di AI, sono ottenute con una percussione energica vicino al ponte ed un deciso smorzamento delle corde con la mano (p.m. = Palm Mute, sordina col palmo della mano). I passaggi ad altissima velocità sono composti fondamentalmente da una serie di segmenti di scala; ne sono stati influenzati chitarristi come Steve Lukather, Vinnie Moore e una serie di esecutori da "competizione e gran turismo". AI allora suonava delle Les Paul, le sue chitarre acustiche erano della casa Ovation.

 

Spaventosa, questa musica vive della sua velocità, esattamente come anche la musica classica. Per suonare musica strumentale interessante occorre essere padroni di una tecnica fenomenale. E' importante che l'ascoltatore colga la complessità della musica: lento, rapido, triste, allegro - sono tanti gli stati d'animo e gli aspetti della musica; non è solo rapidità esecutiva. Come compositore e musicista improvvisatore voglio anche poter tradurre in note reali quello che mi gira per la mente; e a questo scopo non posso fare a meno di una determinata tecnica. Solo così può funzionare. Ma la rapidità esecutiva credo non sia più un punto di discussione ... almeno per gli ultimi 6 o 8 albums.

Ancora qualche osservazione sulla biografia di questo musicista: Larry Coryell è uno dei chitarristi che hanno influenzato inizialmente Al Di Meola: lui ha definito Coryell come il vero e proprio padre della fusion. Al si recava regolarmente ai concerti del suo idolo. I due musicisti si incontrarono e si conobbero: Coryell ha invitato il sedicenne Al nella sua fattoria dove senz'altro gli ha insegnato qualche trucco. AI volle approfondire l'argomento e nel '71 si iscrisse al Berklee College di Boston. In questo periodo ha seguito soprattutto la musica di John McLaughlin, Miles Davis e John Coltrane. Il suo studio sembra avere riscosso successo: infatti Chick Corea si accorse ben presto di lui. Stava cercando un sostituto per Bill Connors e così a 20 anni Al Di Meola divenne il nuovo chitarrista dei Return To Forever, sicuramente uno dei passi più importanti e decisivi della sua carriera. Dieci anni più tardi pensò di intraprendere la carriera di solista e divenne uno dei musicisti di jazz-rock più popolari degli anni '70, una star della chitarra sia elettrica che acustica. D'altro canto mai virtuosismo tecnico e perfezionismo esecutivo è stato tanto criticato e considerato fine a sè stesso come nel caso di questo musicista; ma la re ponsabilità non fu esclusivamente dei critici musicali.

di musica aggressiva e ad alto volume è calata uotevolmente: non rifiuto certo questo aspetto della musica, ma la mia sensibilità musicale è cambiata nel corso degli anni. John McLaugh-Iin è una persona diversa, lui viene da un'altro pianeta. Senza voler stare a criticare, avevamo molti punti in comune qualche anno fa: tutto doveva essere il più forte, il più rapido possibile, un'energia illimitata, ecco cosa volevamo esprimere. E' una tendenza comune alla maggior parte dei giovani musicisti. Pat Metheny si è sviluppato in un certo modo alla rovescia negli ultimi tempi. Ho sentito che ha pubblicato un disco solo con rumori (ridacchia). Ma devo dire che non l'ho ancora ascoltato. Forse ha solo voluto esprimere la sua frustrazione di essere cacciato sempre nello stesso cassetto ..• che ne so .... Avrà pure avuto i suoi motivi.


Come come avete lavorato in studio sul tuo ultimo album "Orange And Blue"?

AD M: Ho registrato una quantità di basi Iive col mio tastierista Mario Parmisano, per il resto è un album molto "prodotto". Le parti di chitarra le ho registrate successivamente da solo. Ma lavoro anche con una quantità di altri musicisti; a dire il vero, a parte alcuni passaggi improvvisati, è stato un lavoro molto ben pianificato. Ma non mi dispiace neppure l'altro sistema: andare in studio con un'intera band e registrare tutto più o meno dal vivo. In questo caso la possibilità di inserire dei guest-musicians è quasi impossibile in quanto il prodotto, una volta registrato, è bell'e finito così com'è. Nel mio nuovo album ho avuto la possibilità di lavorare con quei musicisti che volevo per le mie composizioni: Peter Erskine, Manu Katchè, Marc Johnson, Pino Palladino - tutta gente con cui volevo lavorare già da sempre. E poi c'era ancora Steve Gadd che non aveva più suonato da lO - 11 anni sui miei dischi; è stato meraviglioso averlo di nuovo su una mia produzione. E' gente che contribuisce in modo veramente speciale alla mia musica.


 

Hai altri progetti?

ADM: Attualmente sto suonando anche con Jean Luc Ponty e Stanley Clarke in trio, musica puramente acustica. Tra non molto registreremo anche un album che comparirà l'anno prossimo.

 

Esistono nuovi dischi che ascolti volentieri?

ADM: Vuoi dire dischi di altri artisti?


Immagino che ami ascoltare anche le tue produzioni.

ADM: Sì, il mio nuovo album lo ascolto molto volentieri. (Riflette) Mmmmh, ci ho lavorato talmente tanto e con tanto impegno che ho quasi ascoltato altra musica (riflette) ..•Enigma!

 

Stai parlando del progetto di Michael Cretu?

ADM: Esatto, quel tipo che vive ad Ibiza.


 

Molta gente che si considera importante ed intelligente non ama questo genere di musica. Ma Cretu fa degli ottimi dischi, ha un suono inconfondibile. Dove hai sentito la loro musica?

ADM: Sai, la Jazz-Radio negli Stati Uniti è terribile, tutto quello che suonano è "bullshit easy Iistening" – spaventoso! Ecco perché le stazioni rock hanno sempre maggiore successo: loro almeno non trasmettono tanta spazzatura. E' lì che ho sentito uno spot del nuovo album degli Enigma, un brano con una voce indiana, un pezzo fatto molto bene. Non è certo una rivoluzione musicale, ma il suono è molto individuale, creativo; ecco perchè mi piace. Apprezzo in ogni caso le produzioni intelligenti e creative. Non vorrei però che ti facessi un'impressione sbagliata: Enigma non rappresenta il mio gusto musicale; amo molti tipi di musica tutti diversi.

 

Atmosfera e ambiente mi sembranoimportanti sia per l'ascoltatore che per il musicista. Evidentemente vuoi lasciare al tuo ascoltatore la possibilità di interpretazione, la libertà di feeling; lasciare che scopra sempre nuovi aspetti della musica. Questo è quanto mi è capitato all'ascolto di alcuni brani del tuo disco.

ADM: Ottimo, se riesci a cogliere la musi~a in questo modo; una reazione di questo genere mi dice che il mio disco per te ha qualcosa di particolare. Quando un disco mi piace così di primo acchito, me ne stanco anche rapidamente. Quando invece ad ogni nuovo ascolto scopro qualcosa di nuovo è un ottimo segno. Mi è capitato per esempio con i dischi dei Weather Reporto La combinazione tra atmosfera e stato d'animo è importante quanto tutti gli altri ingredienti musicali.

 

Un ottimo esempio è "Secret Story" di Pat Metheny. Conosci questodisco?

ADM: L'ho sentito una volta e mi è sembrato molto riuscito; un album molto "prodotto", come il mio. Pat Metheny a quanto ho sentito, ci ha investito un milione di dollari. lo non ho avuto nemmeno un decimo. Se una casa discografica mi offrisse tanti soldi per una produzione .•. (riflette sorridendo) ... accetterei subito!

 

Oltre alla musica e i soldi ci sono altre cose che ti interessano? Fare a maglia, indossatrici, films, politica, religione ...?

AD M: Jessica Lange è la mia attrice preferita. Religione e politica mi annoiano; organizzazioni come la "Scientology Church" mi fanno venire i brividi. La mia religione è la mia musica, anche se può sembrare ridicolo. Ma la musica mi permette di concentrarmi, mi dà forza. Conosco una quantità di musicisti che stanno tutt'altro che bene... fanno una vita schifosa, ma quando hanno il loro strumento in mano stanno bene; è come una religione, quello in cui credo esiste veramente, non me l'ha raccontato nessuno, ma ne ho fatto esperienza diretta io stesso. Questo tavolo qui lo posso toccare, lo vedo, sta di f ronte a me. La stessa cosa succede con la musica ed ecco perchè ci credo. Tutto il resto non funziona! La gente deve poter fare quello che vuole, deve poter essere libera sempre che non faccia del male ad altri. Ma questa è solo la mia opinione.


Mediterranean Sundance/Rio Ancho
Fantasia Suite (Al Di Meola)
Frevo Rasgado
Guardian Angel
Short Tales Black Forest

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CARLTON LARRY FINGERPRINTS LIBRO CHITARRA TABLATURE-lazy susan-chicks with kickstands-gracias

CARLTON LARRY, FINGERPRINTS. TABLATURE

LIBRO DI MUSICA, SPARTITO PER CHITARRA CON TABLATURE.

 

Fingerprints -silky smooth -the storyteller -Ôtil i hurt you -slave song -all thru the night -lazy susan -chicks with kickstands -gracias -crying hands.

Description
All ten tracks from the album arranged for guitar in standard notation and tablature. Includes Silky Smooth, Til I Hurt You and Crying Hands. 120 Pages.

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LARRY & LEE RITENOUR-CARLTON GUITARS TABLATURE SPARTITI CHITARRA TRASCRIZIONI BOOK

LARRY & LEE - LARRY CARLTON & LEE RITENOUR. SHEET MUSIC BOOK WITH GUITAR TABLATURE.

LIBRO DI MUSICA JAZZ FUSION.

SPARTITI PER CHITARRA CON: 

ACCORDI, PENTAGRAMMA, TABLATURE. 

2 PENTAGRAAMI, 2 LINEE DI TABLATURA.

103 PAGES.

SUPER TRANSCRIPTIONS !

LARRY CARLTON e LEE RITENOUR
(YEAR ALBUM: 1995)

Crosstown Kids - MUSIC BY LEE RITENOUR. 
Low Steppin' - MUSIC BY LEE RITENOUR and LARRY CARLTON. 
L.A. Underground - MUSIC by LEE RITENOUR. 
Closed Door Jam - MUSIC BY LARRY CARLTON.  
After the Rain - MUSIC by LEE RITENOUR. 
Remembering J.P. - MUSIC by LARRY CARLTON. 
Fun in the Dark - MUSIC by LEE RITENOUR. 
Lots About Nothin' - MUSIC by LARRY CARLTON. 
Take That - MUSIC by LEE RITENOUR. 
Up and Adam - MUSIC by LARRY CARLTON. 
Reflection of a Guitar Player - MUSIC BY LARRY CARLTON. 

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CARLTON LARRY TABLATURE ROOM 335-NITE CRAWLER-POINT IT UP-RIO SAMBA DON'T GIVE IT UP-(IT WAS) ONLY

CARLTON LARRY, LARRY CARLTON. BOOK WITH GUITAR TABLATURE

LIBRO DI MUSICA JAZZ FUSION,

SPARTITO PER CHITARRA CON:

ACCORDI, PENTAGRAMMA, NOTE, TABLATURE.

Room 335 - Musica di: Larry Carlton - 1973
Nite Crawler - Musica di: Larry Carlton - 1977
Point It Up - Musica di: Larry Carlton - 1978
Rio Samba - Musica di: Larry Carlton - 1978
Don't Give It Up - Musica di: Larry Carlton - 1978
(It Was) Only Yesterday - Musica di: Larry Carlton - 1978

 

A longtime Nashville resident, Larry Carlton will perform a special hometown show at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center on Friday, September 30. Carlton spoke to Examiner.com about the upcoming show, his long career, playing with Michael Jackson and Dolly Parton, his continuing passion for music and more in the following interview.

Special thanks to Larry Carlton, and to Laurie Davis of the Nashville Symphony for arranging this interview.

 

You're playing at the Schermerhorn on Friday. Is this in conjunction with the Larry Carlton Plays the Sound of Philadelphia project?

That will be part of the show. The show I'm putting together is . . . I don't know if you'd call it the landscape of my career, but I'm going to do some things that I haven't done before, and the people are gonna be excited. They're gonna go, "Wow, I didn't know he played on that," or "Really? He was involved in that?"

I want to do a special show that night. It won't be just me and a sax player. (Laughs).

How did this come about? Did they approach you, or were you looking around for an appropriate venue for a particular type of show?

I was approached. I guess they finally got around to me. (Laughs). No, I was excited when I got the call. It's hometown for me, and the venue, if you will. I'm really excited.

I saw on your web site that you're going to be appearing with Steely Dan in New York City. Did you see them when they were in town?

No, I was actually out of town. Last year, or a year and a half ago they invited me to do seven shows with them. So I did a couple of nights in New York, one in Chicago, a couple of nights in LA. It was the first time . . . well, I'd never played live with them, and it was the first time in 35 years, since we cut The Royal Scam, that I went back and learned my solo from "Kid Charlemagne."

What's it like going back and re-visiting a part of your own career like that? Is it strange for you?

They're great memories. The weirdest thing for me is, I've never learned one of my own solos. (Laughs). I knew I had to play it note-for-note, and when I did, I got a standing ovation. People wanted to hear Larry play that solo.

After the long career you've had and all the various things you've done, what is it that keeps you active and excited about music?

That's a difficult question in that, at four years old I was fascinated with the guitar. At six years old I started taking lessons. I was passionate about it through the next fifty years, and that passion still exists.

Do you still keep an active practice regimen? Do you have the guitar in your hand every day?

No, normally I do about 125-150 a year touring around the world. So when I come home - and this is not new to me, I did this way back in the seventies - it's not unusual for me to not touch the guitar for a month, and just live my life; go horseback riding, go fishing.

I find that's good for my soul, good for my mind, and then when I come back to the guitar it's time to go again. It's a balance, I think.

You came up in an era where everything about the business was different. With all the changes in recording and distribution, do you think it's easier or harder for an artist in your position than it used to be?

Well, I have a unique situation, so I'm going to say it's easier. I have my own label now, and for the last four-and-a-half years. It was the first time in 17 years that I wasn't on a major label, and it was by choice. With the Internet I can talk to, play for, make music for the whole world, not just the US. When I was on a major they were very focused on the US.

Of course my albums were distributed overseas, and I have a great career in Japan and Europe. But now, I get an idea for a project . . . maybe it'll come from someone on Facebook saying, "Larry, have you ever thought of something with strings?" It could happen like that. So I'm enjoying the freedom of getting to make those choices.

What about the downside of the Internet, which is illegal downloading. Has that impacted you in the same way that it has rock and pop acts?

Well, of course. My numbers are down, like most artists, because everybody's exchanging files back and forth. That affects not only your record royalties, but your publishing and writing royalties. But it's just a new day, and I'm going with it. On my web site I'm sharing how I learned the guitar, how I play it . . . I want to be part of this new scene, and not avoid it and resent it.

You've obviously done a ton of recording, but two names jumped out at me from all that you've done that I wanted to ask you about, one of which is Michael Jackson. What did you do with Michael Jackson?

Quincy [Jones] called and said, "Larry, I have a special song, and it's got to be you." Because I wasn't doing a lot of dates, I'd already discontinued doing a lot of dates back then. So I went in and recorded what became a single, "She's Out of My Life."

In fact I'm looking at a three-foot plaque in my office right now that says, "Michael Jackson Off The Wall, over five million albums sold. We got all the marbles on this one, thanks for your help, Quincy." And there's four marbles in the bottom of it. It has a picture of Michael and the album cover. So yeah, I played on one cut on that album as a favor to Quincy.

The other one that popped out at me was Dolly Parton. I didn't know you'd done anything with her.

I don't remember the date, to tell you the truth. Whoever was producing her in LA in probably the early-to-mid seventies called me as the guitar player. So I know that I played on some stuff for Dolly, but I don't know what it was. (Laughs).

When you're doing that many different dates in so many different styles as you used to, is there any rational way to prepare for that, or do you just walk in and do it?

You walk in cold.

Versatility has served me well, and I think one of the reasons that I'm so versatile as a musician is because of the era and time that I was brought up. You figure, I was born in 1948, so by the time 1958 came around I'm ten, and I'm listening to doo-wop music on the radio. And that transitioned into the sixties, and rock and roll became very big.

So I'm part of that whole history, and I was playing the guitar the whole time. Every time something new came out in a style, I was aware of it. It was part of my hunger to learn how they did that. I wanted to learn the solo on an Elvis Presley record, and then The Beatles came along. So I lived through that transition, and the one thing that really made me a little bit different is that I fell in love with jazz when I was 14, but I didn't neglect pop music.

Back then every genre lived side by side, whereas now it's become divided and everything is micro-marketed to a very narrowly defined target demographic. How has that impacted you?

Obviously because I'm an instrumentalist, I was very happy in the mid-eighties when that format came along called the quiet storm, which transitioned into smooth jazz. All of a sudden there was a place on the radio for those of us that don't sing.

But I think it's run its course, I think it's boring now, and most of the stuff on those stations all sounds the same. You can't tell one sax player from another. But it was a neat thing that happened, and it exposed a lot of us to people that otherwise wouldn't have known us.

Are you finding that there's any good that's coming to you from any of the various alternatives, like satellite radio?

Yeah, I think so. You know, my songs are on those stations, and I'm sure there are people at home that keep those on sometimes, and listen to them while they're living their lives in their house or car, so it's just a nice place where someone might discover an artist.

You're offering interactive lessons on your web site. What gave you the idea to do that?

I was doing a guitar seminar in New York, and a producer was there who produces teaching DVDs. He has the largest Internet site, called True Fire. Anyway, he was impressed with my seminar and the way I communicate, so he approached me and said, "I'd like to produce a teaching video with you. It's been twenty years since you've done one." So that's how it started, and it still continues. I'm flying out tomorrow to speak to him about another project. So having a great producer helps me expose what I want to give to the guys out there.

What do you think is the most important thing to know for a kid who wants to play guitar?

I think what you just said: if a kid wants to play. I think motive is really important. What's your motive to play the guitar? Mine was always to make music. I can say this honestly: I never thought about being a star. It never entered my mind. I wanted to play the guitar. My dream as a teen was to be like my jazz heroes and play jazz in smoky clubs my whole life. I didn't know I was gonna become a session guy or any of that stuff.

So it's motive. Are you doing this because you want to be a star, or do you want to be a musician? If you're doing it because you want to be a star, then you'll go that direction, and that's okay. Both avenues are fine, but I think you've got to be honest, because I think truthfulness comes out of you when you're playing your music.

I read this online; is it correct or incorrect that your niece is Vanessa Carlton?

Nope. Incorrect! (Laughs).

I suspected that.

 

Your son Travis is a bass player. Is it something that gives you pause, to see him go into the business? Because you have a decades-long bird's eye view of how difficult it can be.

All I can tell you is that he's gifted with music, and then he worked very, very hard as soon as he got out of high school. He went to GIT, graduated top of the class, Best Performer . . . he's a gifted, gifted musician who's worked very hard, and now he's reaping the rewards of that.

When he was a little boy sitting on my lap, and I'd be mixing a song in my studio, his body was always in time with the song. As a little kid. The stuff you can't teach, Travis got. I'm very proud of him. He plays in my band, he plays in Robben Ford's band, and he plays in Scott Henderson's band. People like grooving to Travis. It's a beautiful thing.

I wanted to ask you about Christianity and the music business. Do you ever find that being a Christian and being in the music business are at fundamentally cross purposes?

Personally, I have never had a struggle. When I became a reborn Christian in 1983, the Holy Spirit never told me, "Change what you're doing, Larry. Don't do that anymore." I mean musically. I was never called to that, "All right, now you only play religious songs." So I'm very comfortable with my relationship with God, and I just make my music, and my testimony is my music, and how I live my life.

I know some other Christian musicians that have been called to do it a different way, a more aggressive way, a more out-front way. I haven't been called to that, so I'm just growing where I was planted.

Is there anything else you want to say about the Schermerhorn show or whatever else is coming up?

I'm just excited to play at the Schermerhorn in my hometown, and I plan on bringing the best show I can.

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CARLTON LARRY GUITAR PLAYER TABLATURE CHITARRA LIBRO SPARTITO Room 335 sleepwalk

CARLTON LARRY, GUITAR PLAYER. 

SHEET MUSIC BOOK WITH GUITAR TABLATURE. 

LIBRO DI MUSICA FUSION,

SPARTITO PER CHITARRA CON

ACCORDI, PENTAGRAMMA, TABLATURE. 

 

Anche per due chitarre. Room 335 -nite crawler -point it up -Rio samba -(it was) only yesterday -strikes twice -midnight parade -song for Katie -sleepwalk -blues bird -south town -blues for T.J. -crusin'. 

Prezzo: €98,00
€98,00
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