CONSTRUCTING A 5-STRING BANJO A Complete Technical Guide Roger H. Siminoff. Hal Leonard LIUTERIA

CONSTRUCTING A 5-STRING BANJO A Complete Technical Guide. H. Siminoff. 200 photos.

LIBRO DI LIUTERIA

CON PROGETTI COMPLETI. 

 

Siminoff vi insegnerà come fare il Rim la cassa armonica del Banjo, con il freno a tamburo di un camion.

Series: Reference
Publisher: Hal Leonard
Medium: Softcover
Composer: Roger H. Siminoff

Just as in his other book, Constructing a Bluegrass Mandolin, Roger's simple and concise step-by-step instructions show you the how and the why of it all, leading you on a path that blends discovery with pure joy. Over 200 photos and illustrations provide the kind of valuable reference no other book in the field can offer. Roger has used his technical knowledge on design, sound, and all of the important stages of construction that go into the building of a musical instrument, and has incorporated these ideas into one text. The end result is this valuable book of information that will help you to learn more about the makeup of a 5-string banjo, and more importantly, will give you the satisfaction and pride in being able to accomplish the building of a banjo that you can play and enjoy for years to come. 64 pages.

+ 7 PAGINE APRIBILI DI PROGETTI

Roger H. Siminoff has been building and playing musical instruments for almost 30 years. During that time, he has had far more than a cursory interest in music, graphic arts, and industrial design - a combination that has made him one of America's foremost authorities on string instruments and their design, a leading music journalist, and a highly respected inventor. Born in 1940 in Newark, New Jersey, Siminoff showed an early interest in mechanical things. That laid an important foundation for his creative career. As a teenager Roger built his first instrument, a roughly crafted - but playable - 5-string banjo. The first led to a second, and that led to a whole series of instruments, and ultimately to a catalog full of Siminoff-crafted instrument parts. By the early 1960's, Roger was building custom banjo necks and parts for musicians in the New York metropolitan area. Before the end of the decade, his mail-order parts business, Siminoff Banjos, was providing special equipment and accessories to instrument makers in every part of the world. During that time, Roger was attending the Parsons School of Design in New York City. He majored in Industrial Design and then started a graphic arts company in New Jersey that specialized in photography, art services, and printing. Not limiting his mechanical interests to instrument construction, in 1963 he developed and built a prototype for a major East Coast printing equipment manufacturer, of an offset printing machine capable of printing the faces and flaps (at the same time) of envelopes at 18,000 impressions per hour - a rate unprecedented in the ihdustry. Having branched out into the building of guitars and mandolins in early 1970, Siminoff conceived and built special carving machines needed to do the exact shaping of instrument necks, and of mandolin top and back plates. By early 1973, he had developed a unique truss rod system to counteract the forces of string tension on musical instrument necks. For this design, he was awarded a U.S. patent in 1974. During the following year, that design was licensed to Gibson Incorporated, an internationally prominent musical instrument manufacturer now based in Nashville, Tennessee. With printing facilities readily available to him, Siminoff channeled his banjo expertise into the writing and preparation of an instruction book for bluegrass and banjo playing. The book established itself as a success in a matter of months. Then Roger embarked on an even more ambitious publishing project: the creation of a monthly music magazine that focused on bluegrass and old-time country music. In February 1974, PICKIN' MAGAZINE made its debut. Within two years, it was hailed as the most influential publication of its kind. By mid 1975, Roger had several other musical instrument and accessory designs in progress. These included the invention of a special fast-wind turning knob for string instruments (for which he was granted a U.S. And several foreign patents). The knob, dubbed the "CRANK," has been licensed to Gibson and to Schaller, (W. Germany) a world reknowned manufacturer of tuning machines. A unique nut, with adjustable slots for each string, also won Siminoff a U.S. patent and subsequently was Iicensed:to Dunlop Manufacturing. Then his frustrations at the inconvenience of changing strings won him a few more patents: he invented two methods to change instrument's strings without cutting, twisting, or knotting them. Both designs received U.S. Patents; and one, a string with a special pin_at its peg head end, was licensed to Gibson under the name "GRABBERS." In early 1984, Roger was granted another U.S. Patent for an unusual modular guitar, with interlocking parts that permit a musician to assemble an instrument to suit his or her tastes in much the same way a photographer might change camera bodies and lenses. Several other music-related designs are in progress on the Siminoff workbench, and simmmering with them on the burner are many projects not related to music, such as a radical design for a new valve system for the common gasoline engine. As a consultant to Gibson, Roger assisted in the reissuance of several instruments originally produced by Gibson in its earlier years. Among these were the Earl Scruggs model banjo (a replica of Scruggs' Granada model). Another was the reintroduction of the famed F-5 mandolin produced by Gibson in the 1920's. This instrument has been enthusiastically received since making its successful "comeback" in 1978. Doing consulting work for several other instrument manufacturers, Siminoff has been responsible for the development of special hand-finishing techniques, improved structural designs, and compatability "tuning" of the acoustic properties inherent in individual instrument parts. As an author, Siminoff's writings include literally hundreds of articles on instrument construction and repair, musical acoustics, and the history and craftsmanship of musical instruments. In 1978, Roger was invited to join GPI Publications in Cupertino, California, to head the staff of the newly founded magazine FRETS. As the magazine's editor, Roger helped build FRETS into a highly respected enterprise, boasting an international circulation, within a twoand- a-half-year period that saw FRETS purchase and absorb Roger's first magazine venture, PICKIN'. In the years that followed, Roger also became GPI's Production Director. In that capacity, he developed and installed a major computer system for all of the company's complicated subscription, advertising, and newsstand data processing. Now, in his capacity as GPI's Assistant Publisher, Roger Siminoff is helping to shape the music industry of tomorrow.

Constructing A Bluegrass Mandolin (Hal Leonard Publishing)

 

INTRODUCTION

FOREWORD

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

PREFACE

 

CHAPTER ONE

THE INSTRUMENT

TOOLS

HARDWARE

 

CHAPTER TWO

ACOUSTICS OF THE BANJO

 

CHAPTER THREE

WOOD

mahogany

walnut

ebony

rosewood

Availability Of Woods 

 

CHAPTER FOUR

GLOSSARY

 

CHAPTER FIVE

BUILDING THE NECK

The Truss Rod

Attaching The Ears

Locating The Fretboard Plane

Shaping The Neck

Attaching The Peghead Veneer

Finalizing The Peghead Thickness

Shaping The Peg head

Drilling The Peg head

 

CHAPTER SIX

THE FRETBOARD

Binding The Fretboard

Installing The Fretboard

Position Markers

Shaping The Neck To The Fretboard

Drilling The Fifth Peg Hole

DECORATION 22

Creating The Designs

Cutting The Pearl

Inlaying The Pieces

Cementing The Pieces In Place

Finishing The Inlaid Surface

INSTALLING THE FRETS

FINISHING TOUCHES TO THE NECK

 

CHAPTER SEVEN

CONSTRUCTING THE RIM

Types Of Rim Constructions

Three-Ply Rims

Pie-Shaped Laminated Rims

Flat-Board Laminated Rims

STEAMING AND BENDING MAPLE

Steam Bending, Step By Step

LAMINATING THE 1/4" STRIPS

CONSTRUCTING RIMS WITH PIE-SHAPED PIECES

CONSTRUCTING FLAT-BOARD LAMINATED RIMS

CONSTRUCTING VENEER LAMINATED RIMS

MACHINING THE RIMS

ADDING A LIP FOR TUBE-AND PLATE FLANGES

 

CHAPTER EIGHT

THE RESONATOR .

Constructing The Rim .

Constructing The "Dish" .

Assembling The Resonator .

Adding The Outer Side Veneer .

Machining The Resonator .

Installing The Binding .

Cutting The Neck Opening In The Resonator Rim .

 

CHAPTER NINE

PRE-FITIING ALL THE PARTS

Shaping The Neck Heel .

Fitting The Nut .

 

CHAPTER TEN

FINAL SANDING 

FILLING THE WOOD'S PORES 

 

CHAPTER ELEVEN

COLORING .

Curly Maple Grain Contrast .

Sunburst Shading .

Coloring The Rim .

CLEANING THE BINDING .

 

CHAPTER TWELVE

FINISHING .

Preparation For Spraying .

Wet Sanding .

Polishing .

 

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

ASSEMBLING THE INSTRUMENT .

Dressing The Fretboard .

Dressing The Frets .

Truss Rod Cover .

Installing The Geared Machines .

Installing The Fifth-String Peg .

Installing The Fifth-String Nut .

Attaching The Neck .

Attaching The Tailpiece .

Attaching The Armrest .

Resonator Hardware .

Filling The String Slots In The Nut .

MAINTENANCE AND MINOR ADJUSTMENTS .

PARTING THOUGHTS .

 

APPENDIX I

SUPPLIERS 

 

APPENDIX II

FRETIING SCALES 

 

APPENDIX III

HARDWARE 

DIAGRAMS 1-7 .

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