Roger H. Siminoff

LUTHIERS GLOSSARY SIMINOFF'S Roger Siminoff 206 pagine LIBRO LIUTERIA CHITARRA

LUTHIERS GLOSSARY SIMINOFF'S, Roger Siminoff. 206 pagine.

LIBRO CON SPIEGAZIONE DI OLTRE 800 TERMINI CHE RIGUARDANO LA LIUTERIA.

 

SIMINOFF'S LUTHIERS GLOSSARY
First Edition
Series: Book
Publisher: Hal Leonard
Medium: Softcover
Author: Roger Siminoff

Siminoff's Luthier Glossary is a first-edition compendium of more than 800 technical terms used in the design, construction, and production of string musical instruments. The handy softcover text is intended for all levels of builders from beginners to advanced, and features descriptions of parts, techniques, tools, adhesives, finishes, machinery, woods, stains, acoustics, and legal terms.

The Appendix includes numerous valuable data tables along with two dozen color plates to help recognize the tonewoods and decorative woods used in luthierie. 206 pages

Prezzo: €34,99
€34,99

CONSTRUCTING A 5-STRING BANJO A Complete Technical Guide Roger H. Siminoff. Hal Leonard LIUTERIA

CONSTRUCTING A 5-STRING BANJO A Complete Technical Guide. H. Siminoff. 200 photos.

LIBRO DI LIUTERIA

CON PROGETTI COMPLETI. 

 

Siminoff vi insegnerà come fare il Rim la cassa armonica del Banjo, con il freno a tamburo di un camion.

Series: Reference
Publisher: Hal Leonard
Medium: Softcover
Composer: Roger H. Siminoff

Just as in his other book, Constructing a Bluegrass Mandolin, Roger's simple and concise step-by-step instructions show you the how and the why of it all, leading you on a path that blends discovery with pure joy. Over 200 photos and illustrations provide the kind of valuable reference no other book in the field can offer. Roger has used his technical knowledge on design, sound, and all of the important stages of construction that go into the building of a musical instrument, and has incorporated these ideas into one text. The end result is this valuable book of information that will help you to learn more about the makeup of a 5-string banjo, and more importantly, will give you the satisfaction and pride in being able to accomplish the building of a banjo that you can play and enjoy for years to come. 64 pages.

+ 7 PAGINE APRIBILI DI PROGETTI

Roger H. Siminoff has been building and playing musical instruments for almost 30 years. During that time, he has had far more than a cursory interest in music, graphic arts, and industrial design - a combination that has made him one of America's foremost authorities on string instruments and their design, a leading music journalist, and a highly respected inventor. Born in 1940 in Newark, New Jersey, Siminoff showed an early interest in mechanical things. That laid an important foundation for his creative career. As a teenager Roger built his first instrument, a roughly crafted - but playable - 5-string banjo. The first led to a second, and that led to a whole series of instruments, and ultimately to a catalog full of Siminoff-crafted instrument parts. By the early 1960's, Roger was building custom banjo necks and parts for musicians in the New York metropolitan area. Before the end of the decade, his mail-order parts business, Siminoff Banjos, was providing special equipment and accessories to instrument makers in every part of the world. During that time, Roger was attending the Parsons School of Design in New York City. He majored in Industrial Design and then started a graphic arts company in New Jersey that specialized in photography, art services, and printing. Not limiting his mechanical interests to instrument construction, in 1963 he developed and built a prototype for a major East Coast printing equipment manufacturer, of an offset printing machine capable of printing the faces and flaps (at the same time) of envelopes at 18,000 impressions per hour - a rate unprecedented in the ihdustry. Having branched out into the building of guitars and mandolins in early 1970, Siminoff conceived and built special carving machines needed to do the exact shaping of instrument necks, and of mandolin top and back plates. By early 1973, he had developed a unique truss rod system to counteract the forces of string tension on musical instrument necks. For this design, he was awarded a U.S. patent in 1974. During the following year, that design was licensed to Gibson Incorporated, an internationally prominent musical instrument manufacturer now based in Nashville, Tennessee. With printing facilities readily available to him, Siminoff channeled his banjo expertise into the writing and preparation of an instruction book for bluegrass and banjo playing. The book established itself as a success in a matter of months. Then Roger embarked on an even more ambitious publishing project: the creation of a monthly music magazine that focused on bluegrass and old-time country music. In February 1974, PICKIN' MAGAZINE made its debut. Within two years, it was hailed as the most influential publication of its kind. By mid 1975, Roger had several other musical instrument and accessory designs in progress. These included the invention of a special fast-wind turning knob for string instruments (for which he was granted a U.S. And several foreign patents). The knob, dubbed the "CRANK," has been licensed to Gibson and to Schaller, (W. Germany) a world reknowned manufacturer of tuning machines. A unique nut, with adjustable slots for each string, also won Siminoff a U.S. patent and subsequently was Iicensed:to Dunlop Manufacturing. Then his frustrations at the inconvenience of changing strings won him a few more patents: he invented two methods to change instrument's strings without cutting, twisting, or knotting them. Both designs received U.S. Patents; and one, a string with a special pin_at its peg head end, was licensed to Gibson under the name "GRABBERS." In early 1984, Roger was granted another U.S. Patent for an unusual modular guitar, with interlocking parts that permit a musician to assemble an instrument to suit his or her tastes in much the same way a photographer might change camera bodies and lenses. Several other music-related designs are in progress on the Siminoff workbench, and simmmering with them on the burner are many projects not related to music, such as a radical design for a new valve system for the common gasoline engine. As a consultant to Gibson, Roger assisted in the reissuance of several instruments originally produced by Gibson in its earlier years. Among these were the Earl Scruggs model banjo (a replica of Scruggs' Granada model). Another was the reintroduction of the famed F-5 mandolin produced by Gibson in the 1920's. This instrument has been enthusiastically received since making its successful "comeback" in 1978. Doing consulting work for several other instrument manufacturers, Siminoff has been responsible for the development of special hand-finishing techniques, improved structural designs, and compatability "tuning" of the acoustic properties inherent in individual instrument parts. As an author, Siminoff's writings include literally hundreds of articles on instrument construction and repair, musical acoustics, and the history and craftsmanship of musical instruments. In 1978, Roger was invited to join GPI Publications in Cupertino, California, to head the staff of the newly founded magazine FRETS. As the magazine's editor, Roger helped build FRETS into a highly respected enterprise, boasting an international circulation, within a twoand- a-half-year period that saw FRETS purchase and absorb Roger's first magazine venture, PICKIN'. In the years that followed, Roger also became GPI's Production Director. In that capacity, he developed and installed a major computer system for all of the company's complicated subscription, advertising, and newsstand data processing. Now, in his capacity as GPI's Assistant Publisher, Roger Siminoff is helping to shape the music industry of tomorrow.

Constructing A Bluegrass Mandolin (Hal Leonard Publishing)

 

INTRODUCTION

FOREWORD

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

PREFACE

 

CHAPTER ONE

THE INSTRUMENT

TOOLS

HARDWARE

 

CHAPTER TWO

ACOUSTICS OF THE BANJO

 

CHAPTER THREE

WOOD

mahogany

walnut

ebony

rosewood

Availability Of Woods 

 

CHAPTER FOUR

GLOSSARY

 

CHAPTER FIVE

BUILDING THE NECK

The Truss Rod

Attaching The Ears

Locating The Fretboard Plane

Shaping The Neck

Attaching The Peghead Veneer

Finalizing The Peghead Thickness

Shaping The Peg head

Drilling The Peg head

 

CHAPTER SIX

THE FRETBOARD

Binding The Fretboard

Installing The Fretboard

Position Markers

Shaping The Neck To The Fretboard

Drilling The Fifth Peg Hole

DECORATION 22

Creating The Designs

Cutting The Pearl

Inlaying The Pieces

Cementing The Pieces In Place

Finishing The Inlaid Surface

INSTALLING THE FRETS

FINISHING TOUCHES TO THE NECK

 

CHAPTER SEVEN

CONSTRUCTING THE RIM

Types Of Rim Constructions

Three-Ply Rims

Pie-Shaped Laminated Rims

Flat-Board Laminated Rims

STEAMING AND BENDING MAPLE

Steam Bending, Step By Step

LAMINATING THE 1/4" STRIPS

CONSTRUCTING RIMS WITH PIE-SHAPED PIECES

CONSTRUCTING FLAT-BOARD LAMINATED RIMS

CONSTRUCTING VENEER LAMINATED RIMS

MACHINING THE RIMS

ADDING A LIP FOR TUBE-AND PLATE FLANGES

 

CHAPTER EIGHT

THE RESONATOR .

Constructing The Rim .

Constructing The "Dish" .

Assembling The Resonator .

Adding The Outer Side Veneer .

Machining The Resonator .

Installing The Binding .

Cutting The Neck Opening In The Resonator Rim .

 

CHAPTER NINE

PRE-FITIING ALL THE PARTS

Shaping The Neck Heel .

Fitting The Nut .

 

CHAPTER TEN

FINAL SANDING 

FILLING THE WOOD'S PORES 

 

CHAPTER ELEVEN

COLORING .

Curly Maple Grain Contrast .

Sunburst Shading .

Coloring The Rim .

CLEANING THE BINDING .

 

CHAPTER TWELVE

FINISHING .

Preparation For Spraying .

Wet Sanding .

Polishing .

 

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

ASSEMBLING THE INSTRUMENT .

Dressing The Fretboard .

Dressing The Frets .

Truss Rod Cover .

Installing The Geared Machines .

Installing The Fifth-String Peg .

Installing The Fifth-String Nut .

Attaching The Neck .

Attaching The Tailpiece .

Attaching The Armrest .

Resonator Hardware .

Filling The String Slots In The Nut .

MAINTENANCE AND MINOR ADJUSTMENTS .

PARTING THOUGHTS .

 

APPENDIX I

SUPPLIERS 

 

APPENDIX II

FRETIING SCALES 

 

APPENDIX III

HARDWARE 

DIAGRAMS 1-7 .

Prezzo: €19,99
€19,99

CONSTRUCTING A BLUEGRASS MANDOLIN Roger H Siminoff Hal Leonard liuteria LIBRO COSTRUZIONE LIUTERIA

Constructing a Bluegrass Mandolin

LIBRO DI LIUTERIA PER LA COSTRUZIONE DEL MANDOLINO.

CON PROGETTI COMPLETI. SCALA 1:1


The Ultimate Bluegrass Mandolin Construction Manual
Series: Book
Publisher: Hal Leonard
Format: Softcover
Author: Roger H. Siminoff

The Ultimate Bluegrass Mandolin Construction Manual is the most complete step-by-step treatise ever written on building an acoustical string instrument. Siminoff, a renowned author and luthier, applies over four decades of experience to guide beginners to pros through detailed chapters on wood selection, cutting, carving, shaping, assembly, inlays, fretting, binding and assembly of an F-style mandolin. A special highlight is an in-depth chapter on the art of tap tuning. This fully-illustrated manual boasts more than 250 photos, a full-color section on the staining and finishing processes, numerous detailed illustrations, and a bonus set of 20 full-size blueprints. Spiral bound.
Inventory #HL 00331088
ISBN: 9780634062858
UPC: 073999323030
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
160 pages

Mandolin Reference
Series: Reference
Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation
Format: Softcover
Composer: Roger H. Siminoff

This beautifully detailed manual gives clear, step-by-step directions from raw materials to a magnificently finished mandolin through the use of simply-stated texts, photos and templates. Written by one of America's foremost authorities on acoustic instruments. 56 pages, spiral bound, including 19 full-sized blueprints covering each phase of construction. Also features a glossary of terms which enable the reader to more easily follow the instructions.

145 pagine più 20 pagine di progetti a grandezza naturale.

 

A COMPLETE TECHNICAL GUIDE by ROGER H. SIMINOFF

Contents:

FOREWORD
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
INTRODUCTION
The Instrument
Woods
Wood Species
The Structure
Properties
Tools
Fixtures
Templates
Glossary

CHAPTER 1 - THE NECK
The Truss Rod
Squaring The Neck
Peg head Scroll Strengthener
Peghead Veneer
Squaring The Back Of The Peghead
Peghead Venner (Back)
Shaping The Peghead
Machine Holes

CHAPTER 2 - THE BODY
The Block Set
The Body Form (jig)
The Rim (sides)
Locking Up The Rim
The Top Plate
Gluing The Backs
Cutting The Proper Shape
Carving The Plates
Carving Concept
Carving The Scrolls
Preparing The F-holes
Tone Bars
The Lining
Attaching The Lining
Neck Location (top plate)
Attaching The Top Plate
Removing The Body From The Form
Tap Tuning

CHAPTER 3 - ATTACHING THE NECK
Cutting The Neck Joint
Gluing On The Bottom Lining
Gluing In The Neck
Locking In The Neck
The Dovetail Method
Attaching The Backboard

CHAPTER 4 - PREPARATION FOR BINDING
Remove Excess Wood
Sanding The Instrument
Preparation For Binding
Binding
Peg head Binding Notch
15th Fret Cross Piece
The Corner Protectors
Applying The Binding

CHAPTER 5 - INLAY DECORATION
Decorations
Cutting Pearl
Installation Of Pearl Inlay

CHAPTER 6 - THE FRETBOARD
Fretboard Preparation
Inlaying The Fretboard
Installing The Frets
Binding The Fretboard
Position Dots

CHAPTER 7 - ATTACHING THE FRETBOARD
Fretboard Extender
Corner Fillers
Attaching The Fretboard
Dressing Up The Frets

CHAPTER 8 - PRE·FINISH ADJUSTMENTS
Final Sanding
Final Tuning
CHAPTER 9 - COLORING
Staining Procedure
Curly Maple Grain Contrast
Sunburst Shading
Cleaning The Binding

CHAPTER 10 - FINISHING
Lacquer
Preparation For Spraying
Wet Sanding
Polishing

CHAPTER 11 - HARDWARE
Scraping The Fretboard
The Nut
String Notches
The Bridge
Fitting The Bridge
String Notches (bridge)
The Tailpiece
The Tuning Machines
The Pickguard
Adjustments

HAL LEONARD PUBLISHING CORPORATION
 

Prezzo: €37,99
€37,99

THE ART OF TAP TUNING How to Build Great Sound into Instruments Roger H. Siminoff DVD e Libro

THE ART OF TAP TUNING How to Build Great Sound into Instruments. Roger H. Siminoff. DVD e Libro. 

LIBRO DI LIUTERIA CON DVD.


Series: Book
Medium: Softcover with DVD
Author: Roger H. Siminoff

This book explains the secret ingredients needed to obtain the very best tonal qualities when building acoustic string instruments. It includes an exploration of the tools and equipment needed, the methods to excite tones in the instrument, how to make the necessary changes, and how to achieve consistency and repeatability. The text focuses on tap tuning as it relates to mandolins, guitars, banjos, violins, ukuleles, dulcimers, pianos, and more. The DVD includes demonstrations of the acoustic phenomena described in the text. 48 pages.

 

Prezzo: €41,99
€41,99

THE LUTHIER'S HANDBOOK A Guide to Building Great Tone in Acoustic Stringed Instruments Roger H. Siminoff

THE LUTHIER'S HANDBOOK, A Guide to Building Great Tone in Acoustic Stringed Instruments. Roger H. Siminoff.

INCLUDES : STRING GAUGE CALCULATOR

LIBRO MANUALE DI ACUSTICA DEI LEGNI E DI LIUTERIA PER CHITARRA ACUSTICA.

CALCOLATORE PER DETERMINARE IL GIUSTO SPESSORE DELLE CORDE. 

Series: Book
Publisher: Hal Leonard
Medium: Softcover
Author: Roger H. Siminoff

An essential item for the instrument builder, The Luthier's Handbook explores the secrets and science behind making good-sounding acoustic stringed instruments. Renowned author Roger H. Siminoff brings to the table more than four decades of luthiery experience and shares the time-tested philosophies, tips and technology of the craft. As the ideal complement to other books on building instruments, this text describes the structural and acoustical attributes of air chambers; what to listen for when tap-tuning; selecting a good piece of wood; placement of the braces and tone bars and how to tune them; how to select the right strings; what to consider in bridge design concepts; and much more. Includes a free String Gauge Calculator for determining the right set of strings. 96 pages.

 

SIMINOFF


THE MYSTIQUE:
I am a hardcore sailor. And while I sail a fairly modern
sailboat with the latest electronic gear, I have dreamt of the
great crossings of Columbus, Balboa, Erikson, and the rest.
I ponder their bravety, their fortitude, and that certain charm
and splendor that accompanies such heroic and fearless
acts of long ago. And, I wonder how they connected with
their vessels and understood their whereabouts in the
absence of today's modern technologies.
The craft of lutherie boasts such connection. It calls upon
the introduction of modern tools while carrying the
mystique of leather aprons, handmade chisels, smelly
hide glue, and the hands of artisans like Stradivarius,
Guanari, as well as the more contemporary work of
Gibson, Martin, and others.
As sailors learned from the rutters (diaries) of sailors
before them, we have learned from the rutters
(instruments) of these great craftsmen. We evaluate their
measurements, count their grain lines, test their finishes,
and listen to the musical wonderment of instruments
hundreds of years old. Not only do we love how old
instruments sound, we love how old they smell.
It is often suggested that technicians of yesteryear
seemed to do a better job than we can today ... that they
had some secret sauce that made their instruments
sound sweeter. What did they know that we don't? How
did they learn to do that? Who did they learn it from?
And, the most commonly asked question; why does that
"pre-war" instrument sound better than any of those
made today?

THE REALITY:
Maybe one should ask, "what did it sound like then?" As
my friend Mike Longworth of C.F.Martin used to recount,
"we have never learned to make a new instrument that is
100 years old!" Age, and the contribution that time and
years of playing make to an instrument is one of the major
dividing lines between today's lutherie and yesterday's.
The truth is, we have more knowledge about wood and
finishes today than craftspeople did 100 or more years
ago. Our tools are better as are our measuring devices.
Our adhesives are better and our finishes are better and
more durable. The ability to season wood correctly greatly
exceeds what was done in the past by stacking, stickering,
sealing, air drying, and keeping fingers crossed. And, with
today's modern machining and CAD/CAM devices, we can
hob out a neck or body, gang-saw perfectly aligned fret
slots, and build production instruments almost faster than
the wink of an eye.

THE VISION:
There are a lot of wonderful books on instrument
construction and maintenance authored by some of the
best luthiers (and good friends) in the business. I'm guilty
of authoring four. The Luthier's Handbook is not about
making good instruments, but about understanding the
science behind making instruments that sound good. My
goal here is to go behind the scenes and talk about the
philosophy and technology involved in this craft including:
why we choose certain woods, howto select a good piece
of wood, where to put the braces and tone bars, how to
select the right string gauges, whatto listen for when taptuning,
howto tune the components, and more.
My primary focus in this text is on issues which are
acoustical or structural in nature - I'll leave the
cosmetics and instrument design up to you. For example,
I am concerned about the height and weight of the bridge
as it relates to transferring and driving the strings' energy
to the soundboard. While the design is certainly tied to the
bridge's functionality, in this book, I am only concerned
about selection of wood and shape as it relates to
acoustical properties and providing the right leverage or
torque. I talk about finishes from a strictly acoustical
standpoint - whether you choose dull or matte, sunburst
or plain, tinted or clear, is up to you. If your instrument
has a tailpiece, I speak about how it works and not how it
is engraved or plated.
You can build the instrument, I want to help you think
about it. I want to share my experiences of more than 40
years with you. All you have to do is read, think, and, I
hope, build better instruments.


CHAPTER 1

ZEN AND THE ART OF BUILDING ACOUSTIC STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
There are many steps to building instruments and a life
full of opportunities to learn to use them. Practice and
devotion to the craft will help you achieve the knowledge
expected of a luthier.
The great philosopher John Locke, said that "knowledge
was the agreement or disagreement of two or more
ideas." The length of time you spend practicing and
focusing on your craft will develop wisdom (knowledge
plus experience). And, if you have the gift of creativity
and the art of sensitivity, you are clearly on your way to
plateaus of satisfaction and achievement beyond your
wildest dreams.
Whether you build only one or many instruments, you
will learn processes that take you from A to Z. You will
learn to select the right materials. You will learn
techniques and tricks. And, you will learn - from trial
and error - how to work each step through until you
arrive at the desired destination. You will, I hope, learn
from your mistakes and failures. These become the real
tools and secrets of your trade.
But it is not the knowledge and wisdom that will make
you a great luthier. Rather it is the application of this
knowledge and wisdom that become your fingerprint,
your signature. In the final analysis, it is how you apply
the combination of your skills that will herald what people
will see in you through the instruments you build.
Beyond these traits, there is another piece that others will
not see. There is a component of the real you, should you
choose to accept the challenge, that speaks to how you
wear the inner garb of luthier, and how you personally
accept the challenge of devoting your life to being a true
instrument maker.
I know of some luthiers who approach their craft almost
spiritually. They attempt to maintain the greatest presence
of mind and rationality when they are building an
instrument. Their approach to instrument construction is
not just mechanical, but sensual as well- with all of their
senses invited to take part in the process. Their beliefs on
how parts work, and how parts fit, and their reverence for
wood is, to say the least enlightening. To them, the
instrument is not just a bunch of pieces glued together,
but instead an imaginary entity being contained by sides,
top, and back - each of which plays an important role in
unifying the whole. Each corner is not a joint, but the
union of two planes. Each line has a purpose. Each curve
has a thought. Everything has a wholeness, beginning
from the builder's complete vision, continuing through a
finished instrument, and ending with a glorious tone.
I think there is much to be said for having a feeling - a
sense - of what do and how to do it, in addition to the
mechanical knowledge of the craft itself.
While an industrial design student at Parsons School of
Design, I remember being exposed to the idea of feeling
art from the inside of the piece as well as from the
outside. A chair, for example, wasn't just a nice form to
look at; it has an internal meaning and shape, too. You
may have seen sculptors who worked as hard on the
inside of the piece as they did on the outside. Their art
has no boundaries; it is not just outer shapes, but an
entire multi-dimensional piece of sculpture.
When I was living in New Jersey, I had the pleasure of
knowing Keith Ferris, a highly respected artist who
specialized in renderings of Air Force and Navy aircraft.
His work is superb. I remember watching him begin a
wall-size piece of art of several aircraft. His first lines
were those of the superstructure and struts. Then he
penciled in the fuel tanks and innermost components of
the plane. Finally, he covered all of that line work, hiding
it forever under his paint as he completed the picture of
the planes' exteriors. He knew his aircraft were right -
because everything inside them was in place.
To those luthiers I mentioned previously, creating the truss
rod pocket, slot, and filler strip, and gluing in the truss rod,
is as important a procedure as polishing the sound board's
face, even though the rod will not be seen once the
instrument is completed.
The creative process has no boundaries. There are no
rules, there are no guidelines. Anything goes - at least
in the realm of thought. The truly creative work we see in
luthiery comes from free-thinking craftspeople who have
learned the thrill of allowing their minds to take them
away from their textbooks, workbenches, and tools to a
place where they can think, envision, and dream,
returning only when they are ready to create.
For the creative luthier, the mind takes great risk. Their
work is typically unconventional, untraditional, and
possibly unmarketable. They spend a great deal of time
pursuing the infinite aspects of their instruments so ...

An essential item for the instrument builder, The Luthier's Handbook explores the
secrets and science behind making acoustic stringed instruments. Renowned author
Roger H. Siminoff brings to the table more than four decades of luthiery experience
and shares the time-tested philosophies, tips, and technology of the craft.

The Luthier's Handbook includes expert advice on:
Wood selection
Tap tuning
Bridge designs
Bracing and tone bar configurations
Soundboard design and construction
String selection
Truss rods
Tools and fixtures
Much more ...

"When you're in the music business for any length of time, you have the opportunity
of meeting the 'best of the best' ... people like Roger Siminoff. As a designer,
musician, and luthier always looking to make stringed musical instruments better,
Roger has a rare talent for doing just that. Having worked on many projects with him,
I can't say enough about his thoroughness and intuitive skills. As a writer, he expresses
ideas from his heart but with a complete understanding of the subject matter."
Bruce J. Bolen
V.P. Marketing Development
Fender Musical Instruments


 Preface
 Chapter 1 - Introduction
 Chapter 2 - How It Works
 Chapter 3 - Woods
 Chapter 4 - Structure
 Chapter 5 - Bridges
 Chapter 6 - Sound boards
 Chapter 7 - Truss Rods
 Chapter 8 - Strings
 Chapter 9 - Tailpieces
 Chapter 10- Finishes
 Chapter 11 - Tuning The Assembly
 Chapter 12 - Wrap Up
 Index
 About the Author

Prezzo: €31,99
€31,99

CONSTRUCTING A SOLID-BODY GUITAR-A COMPLETE TECHNICAL GUIDE-ROGER H. SIMINOFF LIUTERIA LIBRO

CONSTRUCTING A SOLID-BODY GUITAR, ROGER H. Siminoff.

LIBRO MANUALE DI LIUTERIA PER LA COSTRUZIONE DI UNA CHITARRA ELETTRICA SOLID BODY. 

FOTOGRAFIE BIANCO E NERO E A COLORI DI TUTTE LE FASI DI LAVORAZIONE. 

CON ALLEGATI I PROGETTI IN SCALA 1/1.

 

Guida tecnica completa curata nei minimi particolari per la costruzione di una chitarra elettrica solid-body. I vari tipi di legno, il manico, la tastiera, il corpo, la posizione dei pickup, l'assemblaggio delle diverse parti, fino al colore e alla verniciatura. Il tutto illustrato da oltre 150 fotografie. Contiene anche un progetto pronto per essere realizzato a grandezza naturale. In inglese.

Whether you're a musician or a woodworking enthusiast, you'll thoroughly enjoy Roger Siminoff's book, Constructing A Solid Body Guitar. This 64-page manual uses over 150 photos, several illustrations and four life-size blueprints to assist the reader in choosing the proper materials and tools, as well as using the correct skills and techniques to produce a beautiful handmade instrment that doesn't look handmade at all! Plastic-comb bound.

 

Roger H. Siminoff has been building and playing musical instruments for almost 30 years. During that time, he has had far more than a passing interest in music, graphic arts, and industrial design - a combination that has made him one of America's foremost authorities on string instruments and their design, a leading music journalist, and a highly respected inventor. Born in 1940 in Newark, New Jersey, Siminoff showed an early interest in mechanical things. That laid an important foundation for his creative career. As a teenager, one of Roger's first instruments was a pedal steel guitar with linkage made from model airplane parts. Among others was a roughly crafted - but playable - 5-string banjo. The first led to a second, and that led to a whole series of instruments, and ultimately to a catalog full of Siminoff-made instrument parts. By the early 1960's, Roger was building custom banjo necks and parts for musicians in the New York metropolitan area. Before the end of the decade, his mail-order parts business - Siminoff Banjos – was providing special equipment and accessories to instrument makers in every part of the world. During that time, Roger was attending the Parsons School of Design in New York City. He majored in Industrial Design and then started a graphic arts company in New Jersey that specialized in photography, art services, and printing. Not limiting his mechanical interests to instrument construction, in 1963 he developed and built a prototype for a major East Coast printing equipment manufacturer, of an offset printing machine capable of printing the faces and flaps (at the same time) of envelopes at 18,000 impressions per hour - a rate unprecedented in the industry. Having branched out into the building of guitars and mandolins in early 1970, Siminoff conceived and built special carving machines needed to do the exact shaping of instrument necks, and of mandolin top and back plates. By early 1973, he had developed a unique truss rod system to counteract the forces of string tension on musical instrument necks. For this design, he was awarded a U.S. patent in 1974. During the following year, that design was licensed to Gibson Incorporated, an internationally prominent musical instrument manufacturer now based in Nashville, Tennessee. With printing facilities readily available to him, Siminoff channeled his banjo expertise into the writing and preparation of an instruction book for bluegrass banjo playing. The book established itself as a success in a matter of months. Then Roger embarked on an even more ambitious publishing project: the creation of a monthly music magazine that focused on bluegrass and old-time country music. In February 1974, PICKIN' MAGAZINE made its debut. Within two years, it was hailed as the most influential publication of its kind. By mid 1975, Roger had several other musical instrument and accessory designs in progress. These included the invention of a special fast-wind tuning knob for string instruments (for which he was granted a U.S. Patent and several foreign patents). The knob, dubbed the "CRANK," has been licensed to Gibson and to Schaller, (W. Germany) a world reknowned manufacturer of tuning machines, A unique nut, with adjustable slots for each string, also won Siminoff a U.S. patent and subsequently was licensed to Dunlop Manufacturing. Then his frustrations at the inconvenience of changing strings won him a few more patents: he invented two methods to change instrument's strings without cutting, twisting, or knotting them. One design, a string with a special pin at its peghead end, was licensed to Gibson under the name "GRABBERS." In early 1984, Roger was granted another U.S. Patent, this one for an unusual modular guitar. It features interlocking parts that permit a musician to put together an instrument to suit his or her tastes in much the same way a photographer might change camera bodies and lenses. It is expected that this guitar will make its debut in mid-1986. Several other music-related designs are in progress on the Siminoff workbench. Competing with them for space are many projects not related to music, such as a radical design for a new valve system for the common gasoline engine. As a consultant to Gibson, Roger assisted in the reissuance of several instruments originally produced by Gibson in its earlier years. Among these were the Earl Scruggs model banjo (a replica of Scruggs' Granada model). Another was the reintroduction of the famed F-5 mandolin first produced by Gibson in the 1920's. This instrument has been enthusiastically received since making its successful "comeback" in 1978. Doing consulting work for several other instrument manufacturers, Siminoff has been responsible for the development of special hand-finishing techniques, improved structural designs, and compatability "tuning" of the acoustic properties inherent in individual instrument parts. As an author, Siminoff's writings include literally hundreds of articles on instrument construction and repair, musical acoustics, and the history and craftsmanship of musical instruments.

A COMPLETE TECHNICAL GUIDE by ROGER H. SIMINOFF

A COMPLETE TECHNICAL GUIDE by ROGER H. SIMINOFF

CONTENTS

PREFACE

 

CHAPTER ONE

THE INSTRUMENT

TOOLS

HARDWARE

 

CHAPTER TWO

ACOUSTICS OF THE ELECTRIC GUITAR

 

CHAPTER THREE

WOOD

AVAilABILITY OF WOODS

 

CHAPTER FOUR

GLOSSARY

 

CHAPTER FIVE

BUILDING THE NECK

THE TRUSS ROD

ATTACHING THE EARS

lOCATING THE FRETBOARD PLANE

INSTALLING THE NECK-FASTENING HARDWARE ..

THE PEGHEAD

Covering The Peghead

Creating The Peghead's Shape

Preparing The Peghead Veneer

Attaching The Peghead Veneer

Finalizing The Peghead Thickness

Shaping The Peghead

Drilling The Peghead

 

CHAPTER SIX

THE FRETBOARD

Binding The Fretboard

Installing The Fretboard

SHAPING THE NECK TO THE FRETBOARD

DECORATION

Creating The Designs

Cutting The Pearl

Inlaying The Pieces

Cementing The Pieces In Place

Finishing The Peghead's Inlaid Surface

ARCHING THE FRETBOARD

POSITION MARKERS

INSTALLING THE FRETS

SHAPING THE NECK

 

CHAPTER SEVEN

CONSTRUCTING THE BODY

Types Of Body Constructions

Creating The Body's Shape

laminating The Body

Fitting The Neck To the Body

Cutting Out The Body Shape

lOCATING THE BRIDGE POSITION

INSTALLING A STUD BRIDGE AND STUD

TAILPIECE

INSTALLING A TREMOLO UNIT

lOCATING THE PICKUP POSITIONS

ROUTING OUT THE PICKUP CAVITIES

POSITIONING THE ELECTRONIC CONTROLS

ROUTING OUT THE ELECTRONICS CAVITY

lOCATING THE OUTPUT JACK

CONNECTING All COMPONENTS

INSTALLING THE BRIDGE AND TAILPIECE STUDS.

 

CHAPTER EIGHT

PRE-FITTING All THE PARTS

Fitting The Nut

Electronics Coverplate

 

CHAPTER NINE

FINAL SANDING

FilLING THE WOOD'S PORES

 

CHAPTER TEN

COLORING

Curly Maple Grain Contrast

Sunburst Shading

CLEANING THE BINDING

 

CHAPTER ELEVEN

FINISHING

Preparation For Spraying

Wet Sanding

Polishing

 

CHAPTER TWELVE

ASSEMBLING THE INSTRUMENT

Dressing The Fretboard

Dressing The Frets

Truss Rod Cover

Installing The Geared Machines

Shielding The Electronics

Attaching The Tailpiece, Bridge, and Pickups

Wiring The Electronics

Attaching The Neck

Filing The String Slots In The Nut

MAINTENANCE AND MINOR ADJUSTMENTS

ADJUSTING THE INTONATION

TAKING CARE OF YOUR GUITAR

PARTING THOUGHTS

 

APPENDIX I

SUPPLIERS

 

APPENDIX II

FRETTING SCALES

 

APPENDIX III

HARDWARE

DIAGRAMS 1-4

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