ART OF THE SHUFFLE FOR GUITAR Inside the blues Dave Rubin Hal Leonard CD TABLATURE CHITARRA METODO

ART OF THE SHUFFLE FOR GUITAR. Inside the blues. Dave Rubin, Hal Leonard. SHEET MUSIC BOOK WITH CD & GUITAR TABLATURE.

LIBRO METODO DI MUSICA BLUES, CON CD.

SPARTITI PER CHITARRA CON :

ACCORDI, PENTAGRAMMA, TABLATURE.  

 

An exploration of shuffle, Boogie and Swing rhythms.

Inside the blues. E' proprio vero che l'incisivo accompagnamento ritmico della musica blues uscì dai tasti del pianoforte, e che la chitarra poi imitò soltanto? Questa edizione sulle varie forme ritmiche blues, approfondirà le radici delle vostre conoscenze fino ai torrenti sotterranei della regione del Delta, delle aride pianure rocciose del Texas, della polverosa Kansas City, delle foreste di New Orleans, dell'asfalto e delle pozzanghere di Chicago. CD. TABLATURE

Shuffle
1: A dance step of indefinite Southern African-American origin, perhaps dating from the eighteenth century, in which the feet are moved rhythmically across the floor without being lifted (as in a minstrel show-author).

2: A rhythm derived from the dance step. The term is onomatopoeic, "sh" describing its characteristic smoothness (and especially its sound when played on the snare drum). The alternation of long and short syllables (shuffle, shuffle) evokes its distinguishing rhythm, a subdivision of the beat into uneven triplets, which is more specific than the fundamental swing or boogie woogie rhythm only in that it is usually played legato and at a relaxed tempo.

The term "shuffle," as applied to a type of musical rhythm, appeared around 1917. One of the earliest published songs to use it in its title was "Riverboat Shuffle" by Hoagy Carmichael. Though the recorded version by comet legend Bix Beiderbecke and Wolverines (1924) is both hot and cool, the rhythm is pure 4/4 dixieland. In 1921 a musical revue called "Shuffle Along" was produced with music by Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle. It included, but was not restricted to, the shuffle dance step. However, like the multitude of tunes before the mid~thirties that alluded to a "shuffle," the rhythms on parade were in the style of ragtime, dixieland and the blues. A number of rhythmic strains, including one from the unlikeliest of sources, would need to coalesce to create the true shuffle pattern. To trace this development is to traverse the glorious history of the blues and jazz. From the breakdowns, stomps and hollers of the post~Civil War South to the swinging shuffles of Louis Jordan and Tbone Walker in the forties, the accent has been on the body language of rhythm. Boogie woogie music, with its walking and moving bass lines, undoubtedly provided the driving propulsion behind shuffle rhythms. Though associated almost exclusively with the piano and especially its great solo practitioners, it is generally agreed that guitarists laid the groundwork for this blues-based idiom. The anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, described the entertainment in the late 1800s juke joints as thus: "One guitar was enough for a dance. To have two was considered excellent. Where two were playing, one man played the lead and the other seconded him. The first player was "picking" and the second was "framming," that is, playing chords while the lead carried the melody by dexterous finger-work. Sometimes a third player was added, and he played a tom-tom effect on the lower strings." As the century wore on, pianos took the place of guitars in the lumber, mining, railroad and turpentine camps. Though it is conjecture, the practicality of employing one musician versus two or three, plus the sheer increase in volume afforded by pianos in rowdy barrelhouses (as opposed to acoustic guitars), makes sense of this change. There is less ambivalence, though, about the music performed. Quite simply, patrons wanted to hear the same raucous, rolling rhythms, so piano players devised left-hand patterns analogous to rhythm guitar parts while embelli hino and oloing with the right.


Series: Guitar Educational
Softcover with CD - TABLATURE
Author: Dave Rubin

This method book explores shuffle, boogie and swing rhythms for guitar. Includes tab and notation, and covers Delta, country, Chicago, Kansas City, Texas, New Orleans, West Coast, and bebop blues. Also includes audio for demonstration of each style and to jam along with. 64 pages.

Traces the roots of Shuffle, boogie and swing rhythms from the late 1800s to the late 1940s. Delta, country, Chicago, Kansas City, Texas, New Orleans, West Coast, and Bebop Blues styles are explored in-depth with numerous music examples. The accompanying CD demostrates each example with a complete rhythm section, includes rare photos. 

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63