8-BAR BLUES The complete guide for guitar Dave Rubin LIBRO CD TABLATURE boogie-shuffle-jazz-blues progressions

8-BAR BLUES, Inside the Blues Series, Dave Rubin. CD TABLATURE

LIBRO DI MUSICA PER CHITARRA, CON CD E TABLATURE.

The complete guide for guitar
Series: Guitar Educational
Softcover with CD - TABLATURE
Author: Dave Rubin

Although the term "12-bar" is usually the first form one thinks of when hearing the word "blues," a surprising number of songs make use of another popular form: the 8-bar. This book/CD pack is solely devoted to providing you with all the technical tools necessary for playing 8-bar blues with authority. Includes: a CD with 45 full-band tracks; a history of the 8-bar blues form; instruction on boogie, shuffle, and jazz-blues progressions, including minor keys; rhythm patterns and solos; and much more. 56 pages

 

 

8-BAR BLUES The Complete Guide for GUITAR

By Dave Rubin

 

Description

8-Bar Blues: A Select History

8-Bar Boogie

8-Bar Shuffle

8-Bar Minor Blues

8-Bar Jazzy Shuffle

8-Bar Slow Jazzy Blues

8-Bar Boogie Solo

8-Bar Shuffle Solo

8-Bar Minor-Blues Solo

8-Bar Minor-Key Solo

8-Bar Jazzy Shuffle Solo

8-Bar Jazzy Slow-Blues Solo

Tuning

 

INSIDE THE BLUES

 

8-Bar Blues The Complete Guide for GUITAR.

Though the 12-bar is usually the first form one thinks of when

hearing the word /'blues," a surprising amount of songs make use

of another popular form: the 8-bar. This book and CD package is

solely devoted to providing you with all the technical tools

necessary for playing 8-bar blues with authority.

 

- CD Includes 44 Full-Band 1racks

- History of the 8-Bar Blues Fonn

- Boogie, Shuffle, and Jazzy Blues Progressions, Including Minor Keys

- Rhythm Patterns and Solos

 

A Select History
8-BAR BLUES: A SELECT HISTORY

Eight-bar blues became popular in the era of the "classic women blues singers," in the Twenties,
long before 12-bar blues became the norm, in the Thirties. It appears that 8-bar blues existed in the
South years before the first commercial blues recordings and possibly during the formative years of both blues and jazz, in the 1890s. By extension, American popular music, particularly prior to rock 'n' roll in the Fifties, was often based on 8-measure progressions that were arranged into 32-measure song forms.
In a spoken introduction to a live performance of "Sc James Infirmary" at Louis Armstrong's Town
Hall concert in New York City in 1947, jazz trombonist Jack Teagarden referred to the song as the "oldest blues I ever heard." Not coincidentally, it contains an 8-bar progression:
Dm A7 Dm Gm A7

"Gamblers Blues," a song that can be traced back to 1899, seems to be a precedent for "St. James
Infirmary," though the original derivation possibly goes back even further, to old English ballads. Note that measures 1 and 2 contain the I chord (because the chord is minor, it's a i chord, while the A 7 is just a quick V-chord substitution), a common occurrence in many 8-bar blues.
An early recorded 8-bar blues, and a subsequent classic, is Bessie Smith's "Taint Nobody's Bizness
If We Do" from April 1923. The last four measures of the arrangement reflect elements that are not only common to future 8- and 12-bar blues, but jazz as well:

G7
III7
A b 7 I A07 I E b 7 C7
IV7 #Ivo7 17 VI7
F7 B b 7IE b 7 A b 7IE b 7 B b 7II
II7 V7 17 IV7 17 V7


Sylvester Weaver, the first African-American blues guitarist to record with vocalist Sara Martin, in
November 1923, waxed a clever instrumental ditty in April 1927 called "Damfino Stomp" (pronounced
"damn if I know"), which contains several eight-bar verse variations:

Lonnie Johnson, arguably the most influential guitarist of the 20th century, recorded an eight-bar
duet with a pianist in October 1927 named "6/88 Glide":
 

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56