LIBRO

ROLLING STONES-HOT ROCKS 1964-1971-authentic GUITAR TAB EDITION TABLATURE

ROLLING STONES, HOT ROCKS 1964-1971. 19th Nervous Breakdown - As Tears Go By - Brown Sugar - Get Off of My Cloud - Gimme Shelter - Heart of Stone - Honky Tonk Women - (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction - Jumpin' Jack Flash - Let's Spend the Night Together - Midnight Rambler - Mother's Little Helper - Paint It, Black - Play With Fire - Ruby Tuesday - Street Fighting Man - Sympathy For The Devil - Time Is On My Side - Under My Thumb - Wild Horses - You Can't Always Get What You Want. TAB.

CATEGORY: Guitar Personality
VERSION: Authentic Guitar TAB
FORMAT: Book

Hot Rocks, released almost four decades ago, remains the most significant Rolling Stones compilation ever. It is The Rolling Stones' biggest-selling album-More than 12 million copies! This book features all 21 tracks from this landmark recording--fully transcribed for guitar! Hot Rocks' traces the development of the songwriting team of Jagger and Richards. The album begins with the early cover recording of "Time Is on My Side" and then proceeds chronologically through most of the band's biggest hits from its first decade.

Price: €29,99
€29,99

ACOUSTIC ROCK, Guitar Chord Songbook. 80 acoustic favorites.

ACOUSTIC ROCK, Guitar Chord Songbook. 80 acoustic favorites, incluse: Mrs. Robinson -Knockin' On Heaven's Door -About a Girl -Across the Universe -Angie -Blackbird -Blowin' in the Wind -Bridge over Troubled Water -Drive -Dust in the Wind -Fast Car -Here Comes the Sun -If You Could Only See -Layla -Maggie May -Me and Julio down by the School Yard -Not Fade Away -Pink Houses -The Sound of Silence -Tangled up in Blue -Torn -Wonderwall -Yesterday e altre, 246 pagine. Parole e Accordi.

Guitar Chord Songbook (6 inch. x 9 inch.)
Series: Guitar Chord Songbook
Artist: Various

A handy collection of 80 acoustic favorites, including:

'39
About A Girl
Across The Universe
Angie
Back To You
Band On The Run
Behind Blue Eyes
Best Of My Love
Blackbird
Blowin' In The Wind
Blue Suede Shoes
Bridge Over Troubled Water
Catch The Wind
Change The World
Come To My Window
Could You Be Loved
Crazy Little Thing Called Love
Daydream
Don't Stop
Drive
Dust In The Wind
Fast Car
Fields Of Gold
Give A Little Bit
Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman?
Here Comes The Sun
Here, There And Everywhere
I'll Have To Say I Love You In A Song
If You Could Only See
Iris
Jumper
Knockin' On Heaven's Door
Layla
Learning To Fly
Like A Rolling Stone
Lover, You Should've Come Over
Maggie May
The Magic Bus
The Man Who Sold The World
Me and Julio Down By The Schoolyard
More Than Words
Mother Nature's Son
Mrs. Robinson
My Sweet Lord
Night Moves
No Rain
Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)
Not Fade Away
Only Wanna Be With You
Pinball Wizard
Pink Houses
Quicksand
Road Trippin'
Run Around
Seven Bridges Road
Show Me The Way
Silent Lucidity
Somebody To Love
Someday I'll Be Saturday Night
The Sound Of Silence
Space Oddity
Strong Enough
Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
Sweet Jane (Intro)
Sweet Talkin' Woman
Tangled Up In Blue
Tears In Heaven
3 AM
Time For Me To Fly
Time In A Bottle
Torn
Tropicalia
Two Out Of Three Ain't Bad
Wake Up Little Susie
When The Children Cry
Wherever You Will Go
Wonderwall
Yellow
Yesterday
You've Got A Friend

246 pages

Price: €18,99
€18,99

RAMIREZ JOSÉ III PARLANDO DI CHITARRE In italiano CHITARRA DIECI CORDE VERNICE GOMMA LACCA

RAMIREZ JOSÉ, PARLANDO DI CHITARRA. In italiano.

Price: €34,99
€34,99

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL BEST OF Guitar Recorded Version TABLATURE-Have You Ever Seen The Rain?

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL, BEST OF. Bad Moon Rising -Born On The Bayou -Commotion -Down On The Corner -Fortunate Son -Green River -Have You Ever Seen The Rain? -Hey, Tonight -I Heard It Through The Grapevine -I Put A Spell On You -Keep On Chooglin' -Lodi -Long As I Can See The Light -Lookin' Out My Back Door -Proud Mary -Run Through The Jungle -Susie-Q -Travelin' Band -Up Around The Bend -Who'll Stop The Rain. TAB.

Series: Guitar Recorded Version TAB
Artist: Creedence Clearwater Revival

20 of the best from the CCR vaults, including, 160 pages

Bad Moon Rising
Born On The Bayou
Commotion
Down On The Corner
Fortunate Son
Green River
Have You Ever Seen The Rain?
Hey, Tonight
I Heard It Through The Grapevine
I Put A Spell On You
Keep On Chooglin'
Lodi
Long As I Can See The Light
Lookin' Out My Back Door
Proud Mary
Run Through The Jungle
Susie-Q
Travelin' Band
Up Around The Bend
Who'll Stop The Rain

Price: €32,99
€32,99

GILBERT PAUL GET OUT OF MY YARD BAND SCORE GUITAR TABLATURE CHITARRA LIBRO SPARTITI

GILBERT PAUL, GET OUT OF MY YARD. BAND SCORE. TAB.

Price: €170,99
€170,99

McCartney PAUL BEST BAND TABLATURE BOOK LIBRO SPARTITI CHITARRA TABLATURE BASSO

McCartney PAUL, COLLECTION. BAND TAB.

Price: €99,99
€99,99

CLASSIC ROCK FOR FINGERSTYLE GUITAR Marcel Robinson-Hal Leonard TABLATURE-Every Breath You Take

CLASSIC ROCK FOR FINGERSTYLE GUITAR. 18 canzoni arrangiate per chitarra: Angie -Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You -Brown Eyed Girl -Dream On -Dreams -Dust In The Wind -Every Breath You Take -Fire And Rain -Free Bird -Free Fallin' -Imagine -Just The Way You Are -Layla -New Kid In Town -Something -Wonderful Tonight -Your Song -you're in my heart. TABLATURE

Price: €17,99
€17,99

ROLLING STONE: SELECTIONS FROM THE 100 GREATEST GUITAR SONGS OF ALL TIME Authentic Guitar TAB TABLATURE

 

ROLLING STONE: SELECTIONS FROM THE 100 GREATEST GUITAR SONGS OF ALL TIME. TABLATURE

Rolling Stone: Selections from the 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time

36 Songs That Defined Rock Guitar
Item: 00-32815
UPC: 038081357263
ISBN 10: 0739061488
ISBN 13: 9780739061480
Category: Guitar Mixed Folio
Format: Book
Instrument: Guitar
Version: Authentic Guitar TAB 

Crossroads
Cream,1968
» No. 3 from Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Eric Clapton once described Cream's music as "blues ancient and modern." This track is what he meant. He was not yet 23 when he played this high-velocity version of the Robert Johnson song at San Francisco's Winterland on March 10th, 1968. Everything in Clapton's solos is grounded in the blues vocabulary but pointed to the future. "When Clapton soloed, he wrote wonderful symphonies from classic blues licks in that fantastic tone," Little Steven Van Zandt told Rolling Stone in 2004. "You could sing his solos like songs in themselves."
Appears on: Wheels of Fire (Polydor)


Brown Sugar
The Rolling Stones, 1971
» No. 5 from Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
“Satisfaction" may be the Rolling Stones' most recognizable riff, but this Sticky Fingers hit – based on a gutbucket guitar part devised by Mick Jagger – is the band's raunchy guitar pinnacle. Keith Richards' secret weapon: He's playing a guitar that's missing its lowest string.
Appears on: Sticky Fingers (Virgin)


Eruption
Van Halen, 1978
» No. 6 from Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Eddie Van Halen's 102-second mission statement was a piece he invented onstage: a solo showcase for his mastery of tone and technique, notably the rush of notes he produced with his fretboard tapping. An army of teens would try to duplicate it, emerging years later in every metal band of the Eighties.
Appears on: Van Halen (Warner Bros.)
(Music appears on page)


Stairway to Heaven
Led Zeppelin, 1971
» No. 8 from Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
"Stairway," Jimmy Page told RS in 1975, "crystallized the essence of the band." It's a masterpiece of dramatic ascension: Page's acoustic picking rising into chiming chords, which introduce the solo, a brilliant succession of phrases that steadily move toward rock& roll ecstasy.
Appears on: Led Zeppelin IV (Atlantic)
(Music appears on page )


Statesboro Blues
The Allman Brothers Band, 1971
» No.9 from Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
In 1968, Gregg Allman went to visit his older brother, Duane, on his 22nd birthday. Duane was sick in bed, so Gregg brought along a bottle of Coricidin pills for his fever and the debut album by guitarist Taj Mahal as a gift. "About two hours after I left, my phone rang," Gregg remembers. " 'Baby brother, baby brother, get over here now!' " When Gregg got there, Duane had poured the pills out of the bottle, washed off the label and was using it as a slide to play "Statesboro Blues," the old Blind Willie McTellsong that Taj Mahal covered. Duane had never played slide before, says Gregg, but "he just picked it up and started bumin'. He was a natural." The song quickly became a part of the Allman Brothers Band's repertoire, and Duane's slide guitar became crucial to their sound. "Statesboro Blues" was the opening track on their legendary 1971 live double album, At Fillmore East, and ever since, the moaning and squealing opening licks have given fans chills at live shows. "It wasn't something that Duane would play the same way every night," says current Allmans guitarist Warren Haynes, one of many guitarists who have filled Duane's shoes since he died in late 1971. "But in all of our heads, that's the way it goes." There's one thing the current band doesn't try to replicate from the Fillmore East performance: At the end of Duane's sublime "Statesboro" solo, the guitarist hits an off-key note that Gregg calls the "note from hell." "He left it in because he knew I hated it," says Gregg, claiming that the mistake only adds to the song's legend. "It was live. It was something that happened."
Appears on: At Fillmore East (Island/Mercury)
(Music appears on page )


Whole Lotta Love
Led Zeppelin, 1969
» No. 11 from Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
This thundering rewrite of Muddy Waters' "You Need Love" showcased three of Jimmy Page's specialties: primal, monomaniacal riffs; innovative production; and solos with the savage mastery he'd developed as a top-flight session musician in the pre-Zeppel years.
Appears on: Led Zeppelin II /(Atlantic)
(Music appears on page )


Layla
Derek and the Dominos, 1970
» No. 13 from Rolling Stone" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs ofAll Time
"I didn't do it - it was Duane," Eric Clapton said, laughing, in 1988. Guest guitarist Duane Allman
created one of rock's most exciting and memorable licks, pinching the vocal line from Albert King's "As the Years Go Passing By"and speeding it up. App~ars on: Layla and Oth~r Assorted Love Songs (Polydor)
(Music appears on page )


My Generation
The Who, 1965
» No. 15 from Rolling Stone" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs ofAll Time
Before smashing guitars was a cliche, it was a shock, and The Who's signature song was one shock after another, from Pete Townshend's pile-driving two-chord riff to his sudden disappearance while bassist John Entwistle solos to the glitchy feedback that ends the original recording.
Appears on: My Generation (Geffen)
(Music appears on page )


Black Sabbath
Black Sabbath, 1970
» No. 17 from Rolling Stone" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs ofAll Time
Tony Iommi invented heavy-metal guitar out of necessity: He'd lost two fingertips on his fretting hand, and he used thimbles and dropped tunings to make playing easier. His crawling, dissonant riff (also called "the devil's chord") became the basis of thousands of metal songs.
Appears on: Black Sabbath (Warner Bros.)
(Music appears on page )


Blitzlaieg Bop
Ramones, 1976
» No. 18 from Rolling Stone" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs ofAll Time
There's no guitar solo, because guitarist Johnny Ramone hated solos. But his down-stroke barre chords were fat with Dick Dale's twang and Bo Diddley's strumming. Joey Ramone once said that in Johnny's guitar, he heard organ, piano and other instruments that weren't really there.
Appears on: Ramones (Rhino)
(Music appears on page )


People Get Ready
The Impressions, 1965
» No. 20 from Rolling Stone" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Curtis Mayfield's deepest civil rights anthem is powered by his eloquent open-tuned guitar-playing: The backbeat echoed the new sounds coming out of Jamaica, and the subtle, fluid solo spirals are as expressive as his singing. Bob Marley later synthesized it with "One Love."
Appears on: Ultimate Collection (Hip-O)
(Music appears on page )


Can't You Hear Me Knocking
The Rolling Stones, 1971
» No. 25 from Rolling Stone" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs ofAll Time
The fist-on-your-door riff was classic Keith Richards, while the solo showed Mick Taylor's disciplined touch. "Mick was so lyrical on songs like 'Knocking,' " Charlie Watts has said, noting his love of the song's long instrumental coda. "That was a complete jam, one take at the end."
Appears on: Sticky Fingers (Virgin)
(Music appears on page )


Back in Black
AC/DC, 1980
» No. 29 from Rolling Stone" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Angus and Malcolm Young's dual-guitar masterpiece is the platonic ideal of hard rock. The bridge alone is heavier than most axmen ever manage, and the riff is instantly recognizable: "Black"has been covered by everyone from Living Colour to Shakira, and sampled by the Beastie Boys and Eminem.
Appears on: Back in Black (Epic)
(Music appears on page )


Sweet Child 0' Mine
Guns n' Roses, 1987
»No. 63 from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Slash was sitting on the floor in Guns n' Roses' squalid East Hollywood house sometime in 1986 when he started fooling around with a chiming, circular melody. "It was an interesting sort of pattern," Slash says. "But Jesus Christ, I never thought it was going to become a song." As he kept playing, fellow G n' R guitarist Izzy Stradlin joined in, playing a simple chord progression. They didn't realize that Ax}Rose was listening in from upstairs - and writing lyrics. At rehearsal the next day, the band hashed out what would become "Sweet Child" - over the objections of Slash, who was convinced that the music was too lightweight for what he saw as a "thrash band," But he relented, and soon came up with the lyrical, multisectioned solo that ended up on the finished song. "It's a combination of influences," Slash says. "From Jeff Beck, Cream and Zeppelin to stuff you'd be surprised at: the solos in Manfred Mann's version of 'Blinded by the Light' and Gerry Rafferty's 'Baker Street.''' Despite the solo's complexity, it was the song's precise intro that proved challenging onstage. "It's easy now, but it was very daunting in the early days," Slash says. "Especially because I drank exorbitant amounts of alcohol and had other chemical things going on. I hated playing that song for years."
Appears on: Appetite for Destruction (Geffen)
(Music appears on page)


Adam Raised a Cain
Bruce Springsteen, 1978
»No. 67 from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Before he was known as a songwriter, Springsteen was the fastest guitar player in Asbury Park. And in this bluesy hard-rock blast, he lets those chops loose again, pushing the E Street Band to garage-land with the angriest lead guitar on record.
Appears on: Darkness on the Edge of Town (Columbia)
(Music appears on page 10)


Money
Pink Floyd, 1973
»No. 69 from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
David Gilmour hangs back for the first three minutes of this definitive Floyd rocker, which started as an acoustic blues song in rehearsals. Then the song shifts from a 7/4 stomp into straight time, and he delivers a rampaging freakout, ending up on notes so high most guitars don't even reach them.
Appears on: Dark Side of the Moon (Capitol)
(Music appears on page)


Summertime Blues
Blue Cheer, 1968
» No. 73 from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
This power trio's cover of Eddie Cochran's classic was their only hit, sometimes called the first heavy-metal record. It's a showcase for the massive roar of Leigh Stephens' guitar, so fuzzed-up it scrapes like steel wool, dragging the rockabilly riff through the dust.
Appears on: Vincebus Eruptum (Island/Mercury)


Beat It
Michael Jackson, 1982
» No. 81 from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
There had never been a soul hit with as much heavy guitar as this or a heavy-metal hit with as much soul. Paul Jackson Jr. and Steve Lukather play the menacing riff, but Eddie Van Halen's speed-shred solo is the coup de grace. Van Halen says producer Quincy Jones' only advice was "go be yourself."
Appears on: Thriller (Epic)


How Soon Is Now?
The Smiths, 1985
» No. 90 from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Trm<
Trading guitarist Johnny Marr's spidery technique for a sobbing oscillation on a few extended chords and a tone-bending wail that sounds like the world racingby, this song became a club standard, opening the passageways between underground rock and dance music.
Appears on: Meat Is Murder (Sire) (Music appears on page )


Memo From Turner
Mick Jagger, 1970
» No. 92 from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of AllTrmtt
Guitar virtuoso Ry Cooder, who played on the Stones' Let It Bleed, accused Keith Richards of stealing his open-G tuning technique on singles like "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and "Gimme Shelter." Cooder's jittery slide guitar defines Jagger's first solo recording, which was written for his film role as a decadent rock star in 1970's Performance.
Appears on: The Very Best of Mick Jagger (Rhino)
(Music appears on page )

WhiteRoom
Cream, 1968
» No. 55from Rolling Stone"' Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
The first rock supergroup, Cream gave Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker as much playas Eric Clapton, but Clapton's unrelenting wah-wah cascade signs his name in foot-high letters over the song. Along with Jimi Hendrix's "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)," it made that pedal the sound of '68 psychedelia. Appears on: Wheels of Fire (Polydor) (Music appears on page 246)

Eight Miles High
The Byrds, 1966
» No. 56from Rolling Stone"' Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Roger McGuinn's chiming 12-string solos helped to mold Sixties rock. But what he was inspired by here wasn't rock at all: Indian classical music and saxophonist John Coltrane's explorations of single
chords and phrases. McGuinn said his guitar "breathes like a wind instrument."
Appears on: The Byrds Greatest Hits (Columbia/Legacy)
(Music appears on page 80)

Dark Star
Grateful Dead, 1969
» No. 57from Rolling Stone"' Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
Considered the Dead's greatest live track, this definitive near-half-hour version from an acid-soaked Fillmore West show is Jerry Garcia at his spaciest and most exploratory. Framed by Bob Weir and Phil Lesh, Garcia's free-form improvisation is the song's "nightfall of diamonds" come to life. Appears on: Live/Dead (Rhino) (Music appears on page 76)

Rumble
Link Wray, 1958
» No. 58from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
In 1958, guitar distortion and power chords were virtually unheard of, but Wray stabbed a pencil through his amplifier to make it sound nastier, dragged his pick like a switchblade, and got this blues riff banned by radio stations as an incitement to violence. Not bad for
an instrumental. Appears on: Rumble! The Best of Link Wray (Rhino)
(Music appears on page 186)

Freeway Jam
Jeff Beck, 1975
» No. 59from Rolling Stone'" Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
After years of leading bands with vocalists, Beck proved he is his own best singer. There's a howling quality to his string-bending in this brisk funk. "There were thousands of guitarists playing with their Les Pauls cranked up bloody blaring loud," he later told RS. "I needed to try something new." Appears on: Blow by Blow (Epic) (Music appears on page 90)

Soul Man
Sam and Dave, 1967
» No. 61from Rolling Stone"' Magazine's 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time
"Play it, Steve!" shouts Sam Moore - he's calling out to Steve Cropper, the genius who powered Stax Records' house band. Cropper's fluttering, high-end riffs provide the song's rhythmic mojo, and his squealing fills (for which he used a cigarette lighter in lieu of an actual slide) are its third singing voice. Appears on: Soul Men (Rhino) (Music appears on page 179)

 

 

- Adam Raised a Cain, Bruce Springsteen 

- Back in Black, AC/DC

-Beat It, Michael Jackson Van Halen

-Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen, Santana

-Black Sabbath, Black Sabbath

-Blitzkrieg Bop, Ramones

-Brown Sugar, The Rolling Stones

-Can’t You Hear Me Knocking, The Rolling Stones

-Crossroads, Cream

-Dark Star, Grateful Dead

-Eight Miles High, The Byrds

-Eruption, Van Halen

-Freeway Jam, Jeff Beck

-How Soon Is Now? The Smiths

-I Can See for Miles, The Who

-Layla, Derek and the Dominos

-London Calling, The Clash

-Memo from Turner, Mick Jagger

-Money, Pink Floyd

-My Generation, The Who

-My Iron Lung, Radiohead

-Panama, Van Halen 

-People Get Ready, The Impressions

-(We’re Gonna) Rock Around the Clock, Bill Haley and His Comets

-Rumble, Link Wray - Words and Music: Link Wray, Milton Grant - 1958

-Soul Man, Sam and Dave

-Stairway to Heaven, Led Zeppelin - Words and Music: Jimmy Page, Robert Plant - 1997

-Statesboro Blues, The Allman Brothers Band - Words and Music: Will McTell - 1929

-Stay with Me, The Faces - Words and Music: Ron Wood, Rod Stewart - 1972 

-Summertime Blues, Blue Cheer - Words and Music: Eddie Cochran, Jerry Capehart - 1958

-Sweet Child O’ Mine, Guns n’ Roses - Words and Music: Steven Adler, Saul Hudson, Duff McKagan, W. Axl Rose, Izzy Stradlin - 1987

-That’s All Right, Elvis Presley - Arthur Crudup - 1947

-White Room, Cream - Words and Music: Jack Bruce, Peter Brown - 1968

-Whole Lotta Love, Led Zeppelin - Words and Music: Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham, Willie Dixon - 1969

Price: €32,99
€32,99

ROLLING STONES-HOT ROCKS 1964-1971-BASSO TABLATURE-Jumpin' Jack Flash-Brown Sugar-LIBRO

ROLLING STONES, HOT ROCKS 1964-1971. BASS TAB.

CATEGORY: Bass Guitar Personality
VERSION: Authentic Bass TAB
FORMAT: Book

Hot Rocks was the first, and, four decades later, remains the most significant Rolling Stones compilation ever released. It is The Rolling Stones' biggest-selling album more than 12 million copies! This book features all 21 tracks from this landmark recording--fully transcribed for bass! Hot Rocks' traces the development of the songwriting team of Jagger and Richards. The album begins with the early cover recording of "Time Is on My Side" and then proceeds chronologically through most of the band's biggest hits from its first decade. Titles: 19th Nervous Breakdown * As Tears Go By * Brown Sugar * Get Off of My Cloud * Gimme Shelter * Heart of Stone * Honky Tonk Women * (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction * Jumpin' Jack Flash * Let's Spend the Night Together * Midnight Rambler * Mother's Little Helper * Paint It, Black * Play With Fire * Ruby Tuesday * Street Fighting Man * Sympathy For The Devil * Time Is On My Side * Under My Thumb * Wild Horses * You Can't Always Get What You Want.

Price: €26,99
€26,99
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