LIBRO

TOTO TAMBU OFF THE RECORD-LIBRO SPARTITI CHITARRA TABLATURE LIBRO ACCORDI PENTAGRAMMA

TOTO, TAMB. OFF THE RECORD TAB.

Price: €99,99
€99,99

U2 BEST OF 1980 1990 GUITAR TABLATURE in the Name Of Love-Sunday Bloody Sunday-With Or Without you LIBRO

U2, THE BEST OF 1980 1990. TAB.

Series: Guitar Collection TAB
Artist: U2

14 of their finest from this decade in notes and tab:
Includes photos of the band. 112 pages

All I Want Is You
Angel Of Harlem
Bad
Desire
I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For
I Will Follow
New Year's Day
Pride (In The Name Of Love)
Sunday Bloody Sunday
Sweetest Thing
Unforgettable Fire
When Love Comes To Town
Where The Streets Have No Name
With Or Without You

Price: €31,99
€31,99

VAI STEVE, FIRE GARDEN. Guitar Recorded Version BAND TABLATURE

VAI STEVE, FIRE GARDEN. Aching Hunger -All About Eve -Bangkok -Blowfish -Brother -Damn You -Deepness -Dyin' Day -Fire Garden Suite: Bull Whip/Pusa Road/Angel Food/Taurus Bulba -Genocide -Hand On Heart -Little Alligator -The Crying Machine -The Mysterious Murder of Christian Tiera's Lover -There's A Fire In The House -Warm Regards -When I Was A Little Boy -Whookam. BAND TAB.

Series: Guitar Recorded Version
Matching folio with all 18 tracks, includes full-color photos.
248 pages.

Price: €29,00
€29,00

VAI STEVE, ALIEN LOVE SECRETS Guitar Recorded Version TABLATURE Tender Surrender-The Boy From Seattle-juice

VAI STEVE, ALIEN LOVE SECRETS. TAB.

Bad Horsie
The Boy From Seattle
Die To Live
Juice
Kill The Guy With The Ball/The God Eaters
Tender Surrender
Ya-Yo Gakk

Series: Guitar Recorded Version

Seven-song matching folio with an introduction and 8 pages of color photos. 80 pages.

Price: €26,00
€26,00

VAI STEVE SEX & RELIGION GUITAR TABLATURE LIBRO CHITARRA SPARTITI Touching Tongues

VAI STEVE, SEX & RELIGION. TAB.

Series: Guitar Recorded Version

Matching folio with 13 songs, includes full-color art and photo section.

Dirty Black Hole
Down Deep Into The Pain
An Earth Dweller's Return
Here & Now
In My Dreams With You
Pig
Rescue Me Or Bury Me
The Road To Mt. Calvary
Sex & Religion
State Of Grace
Still My Bleeding Heart
Survive
Touching Tongues

160 pages

Price: €39,99
€39,99

VAI STEVE PASSION WARFARE Guitar Recorded Version TABLATURE LIBRO SPARTITO LIBERTY-SISTERS

VAI STEVE, PASSION & WARFARE. TAB.

Series: Guitar Recorded Version
From one of the world's truly great guitarists, this book is a matching folio to his acclaimed solo album - all edited by Steve himself! Complete with color photos and an introduction by Steve. Includes 14 songs. Also includes complete drum transcriptions for 'Liberty' and 'Answers.' A must for any Vai fan!

Alien Water Kiss
The Animal
Answers
The Audience Is Listening
Ballerina 12/24
Blue Powder
Erotic Nightmares
For The Love Of God
Greasy Kids Stuff
I Would Love To
Liberty
Love Secrets
The Riddle
Sisters

224 pages

Price: €36,99
€36,99

VAI STEVE THE 7TH SONG BAND SCORE LIBRO TABLATURE CHITARRA-For the Love of God-Melissa's Garden

VAI STEVE, THE 7TH SONG. Steve Vai nasce a Long Island nel 1960, studia musica al Berklee College of Music e, giovanissimo suona con Frank Zappa, per il quale lavora come chitarrista e 'trascrittore' delle sue complesse partiture, tra la seconda metà degli anni '70 e i primi metà degli '80. BAND TAB.

Price: €199,99
€199,99

VAN HALEN 3 AUTHENTIC GUITAR TABLATURE LIBRO-NEWORLD-WITHOUT-YOU-ONE I WANT-FROM AFAR-JOSEPHINA

VAN HALEN, 3. TAB.

NEWORLD
WITHOUT YOU
ONE I WANT
FROM AFAR
DIRTY WATER
DOG
ONCE
FIRE IN THE HOLE
JOSEPHINA
YEAR TO THE DAY
PRIMARY
BALLOT
OR THE BULLET
HOW MANY SAY

Price: €29,00
€29,00

VAI STEVE THE ULTRA ZONE-Guitar Recorded Version-TABLATURE-FRANK-LIBRO CHITARRA SPARTITI

VAI STEVE, THE ULTRA ZONE. TABLATURE

Series: Guitar Recorded Version

On this album that the All Music Guide calls an amazing exhibition of six-string talent, guitar virtuoso Steve Vai pays tribute to his mentor Frank Zappa on the song Frank and to Stevie Ray Vaughan on Jibboom. This songbook also includes a special 8-page color section of photos and illustrations, and 11 more songs from the CD transcribed in notes & tab:

I could never overstate the importance of a musician’s need to develop his or her ear. Actually, I believe that developing a good “inner ear”—the art of being able to decipher musical components solely through listening—is the most important element in becoming a good musician. Possessing a healthy imagination is a necessary ingredient for creativity. But without the ability to bring those imagined sounds into the real world, one’s creative aspirations will remain crippled. Training one’s ears to understand and recognize musical sounds and concepts is one of the most vital ways to fortify the connection between the musical ideas in one’s mind and the musical sounds created on one’s instrument.

All musicians practice ear training constantly, whether or not they are cognizant of it. If, when listening to a piece of music, a musician is envisioning how to play it or is trying to play along, that musician is using his or her “ear”—the understanding and recognition of musical elements—for guidance. This is also true when trying to emulate a piece of music, or transcribe it, or even just finding inspiration in it. No matter what one is playing, one’s ear is the navigational device that steers the musical ship where it will go. Without a good ear at the helm, you could find yourself musically adrift at sea.

I have always been fascinated with looking at music written on paper. When I was in college, I took a class called solfege, which entailed learning how to sight-sing. Sight-singing is the art of looking at a piece of written music and singing it. First, you identify the key center, and then you sing the written pitches, using the “doe-ray-me” phonetic structure, just like that song in the movie The Sound of Music. “Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Ti-Do” (pronounced “Doe-ray-me-fa-so-la-tee-doe”) represents a major scale; there are other monosyllabic sounds that represent the other pitches that reside within a 12-tone octave. These solfege classes in college were difficult courses, but they were well worth the time invested. A thorough study and analysis of solfege within the confines of this column would be impractical, so I can only encourage you to investigate it on your own.

I’ve always considered transcribing to be an invaluable tool in the development of one’s musical ear and, over the years, I have spent countless glorious hours transcribing different kinds of music, either guitar-oriented or not. The most well-known example of my guitar-based transcribing labors is The Frank Zappa Guitar Book (Hal Leonard), for which I transcribed, among other things, the entire Shut Up and Play Yer Guitar series of recordings. Many musicians, however, do not have the ability to pull the sounds—guitar solos, rhythm parts, melody lines, etc.—off the records that they love. Transcribing is an art that takes a lot of practice and a study that I encourage everyone to experiment with.

But fear not: you do not need to have the ability to sight-read or transcribe in order to practice ear training exercises. If you are just sitting there with a guitar, there are still a great many ways to develop your ears, in the quest to strengthen the connection between your head and your fingers. Below, I have outlined some of the ways a guitarist can work on ear training exercises using just the guitar.

As guitarists, there are certain things that most of us do that are simply part of the program: we learn some scales, develop some exercises intended to improve our physical abilities, work on chord forms on different parts of the neck, etc. I believe it is extremely important to put aside some time dedicated solely to focusing on ear training.

One of the easiest ways to begin working on ear training is to sing what you play. For example, you can play a C major scale (C D E F G A B) in any position—preferably one that is physically comfortable for you—and sing each note of the scale as you play it, being very careful to sing on pitch as accurately as possible. Start with one note: play the note, sing it, and then play and sing the note simultaneously. Then go to two notes. Once you feel comfortable, take a little piece of that scale, say, the notes C, D, E and F, and create a very simple melody with these notes for you to sing simultaneously, à la jazz guitarist George Benson. This is an easy way to get your ear in sync with the sounds your fingers are creating. Whether you’re soloing over a rhythmic vamp or are playing alone in free time, you have to really stick with it, and don’t allow yourself to slip up or drift into something else. The idea is to endlessly improvise and sing what you are playing, using any key.

Another good thing to do is to record a simple one-chord vamp to play over. First, only play/sing notes that fall within the key, staying within a basic note structure of a five-, six- or seven-tone scale. Don’t start wandering off into your favorite guitar licks to play; save that for another time, when you’ve developed your ear to the point where you can sing just about anything you can play. This is an exercise in discipline: do not play anything that you cannot follow perfectly with your voice. Whether you stay within one octave of the guitar, or you sing the notes an octave lower than the sounding pitches, or you use falsetto to hit the high notes, you must be able to recreate all of the notes played on the guitar with your voice.

If you work on this every day, you’ll find yourself getting better and better at it, and it will become easier to do. The cool thing that happens is that you’ll begin to hear music more clearly in your head, allowing you to formulate musical ideas—write music—within your head, without the aid of a guitar. When you finally do pick up the instrument, you will discover that you will instinctively be able to play these ideas that have taken form in your mind.

To take this a step further, try this exercise: without a guitar at your disposal, picture the guitar’s fretboard in your mind, and then envision playing something so that you will “hear” and “see” the notes as they are played. It may be helpful to sing the notes as you imagine them being played. This is an excellent exercise that will fortify your mind-fretboard relationship and actually improve your ear by strengthening the acknowledgment of “pitch relativity” (how one pitch relates to another, in terms of sound and placement) on the guitar’s fretboard. You may discover some cloudy areas in your mind’s eye/ear, but if you work through it, the picture will soon become clearer and clearer.

These techniques do not address the act of playing one thing on the guitar and singing something completely different. Someone like Jimi Hendrix had the uncanny ability to play very complex rhythm parts and single-note riffs while singing complementary parts. This technique requires a whole different set of brain muscles and is very difficult for many players. Playing one thing while singing another must be worked on as an independent field of study. If I could play the guitar and sing at the same time, hey, I might have a career! I’ll be back next time with some more effective ways to help you to develop your ear.


Asian Sky
The Blood & Tears
Fever Dream
Frank
Here I Am
I'll Be Around
Jibboom
Lucky Charms
Oooo
The Silent Within
The Ultra Zone
Voodoo Acid
Windows To The Soul

208 pages

Price: €30,99
€30,99
Syndicate content