CHITARRA

GUITAR SECRETS MELODIC MINOR REVEALED DON MOCK CD TABLATURE LIBRO SPARTITI METODO

GUITAR SECRETS: MELODIC MINOR REVEALED. Don Mock CD TAB.

CATEGORY: Guitar Method or Supplement
FORMAT: Book & CD

Legendary guitarist and educator Don Mock exposes the closely-guarded "secret" soloing techniques of jazz and rock giants, revealing easy ways to create ultra-cool sounding lines and patterns by substituting simple harmonic minor patterns over dominant 7th chords. These book/CD packages each contain over 60 music examples, lines, licks and patterns. All music is written in standard notation and tablature.

Price: €27,99
€27,99

GUITAR SECRETS: HARMONIC MINOR REVEALED. DON MOCK. CD TABLATURE

GUITAR SECRETS: HARMONIC MINOR REVEALED. Don Mock. CD TABLATURE

Guitar Secrets: Harmonic Minor Revealed

By Don Mock
Item: 00-0055B
UPC: 029156658286
ISBN 10: 076920029X
ISBN 13: 9780769200293

Category: Guitar Method or Supplement
Format: Book & CD
Instrument: Guitar

Legendary guitarist and educator Don Mock exposes the closely-guarded "secret" soloing techniques of jazz and rock giants, revealing easy ways to create ultra-cool sounding lines and patterns by substituting simple harmonic minor patterns over dominant 7th chords. These book/CD packages each contain over 60 music examples, lines, licks and patterns. All music is written in standard notation and tablature.

 

MOCK REVEALS

SECRETS OF THE THE MASTERS !

FAMED GIT INSTRUCTOR EXPOSES TRICKS OF THE TRADE

Legendary guitarist and educator Don Mock exposesthe closely guarded "secret" soloing techniques of jazz and rock giants, revealing easy ways to create ultra-cool sounding lines and patterns by substituting simple harmonic minor patterns over dominant 7th chords.
Containing over 60 music examples, lines, licks and patterns, this book/CD package approaches the potentially complex topics of soloing and scale substitution from a player's perspective; immediately presenting useful lines and patterns that you can use now. All music is written in standard notation and tablature and all the music examples are contained on the included CD.
• New Sounds! New Ideas!
• Over 60 lines, licks and music examples!
• Learn soloing and scale, substitution from a player's perspedive!
• CD included!
• Standard notation and tablayure!
"I DID IT FOR THEMONEY" MOCK ADMITS

ISBN 0-7692-0029-X
9 780769 200293
WARNER BROS. PUBLICATIOS
15800 Avenue Miami
Coming Soon by Don Mock: Guitar Secrets/ Melodic Minor Revealed

Foreword
Learning how to play and use scales has always been a large part of every guitar player's practice schedule. Players have spent countless hours practicing scales up and down all over the guitar, sometimes with great success and sometimes with frustration as the end result.
Those of you that know me from my books and videos, or years at the Guitar Institute of Technology (GIT), know I've been involved in guitar education for a long time. I've seen hundreds of students struggle with the same problems that I faced when going through the process of learning how to play and use scales. After many years of experience, both playing and teaching, I've become a big believer in cutting through the B.S.in learning, and getting to the point of it all, which is playing music.
The presentation and ideas in this book are definitely from a "player's" perspective. We're not going to get too in-depth into the history and "classical theory" of the harmonic minor scale. We'll focus more on its uses in contemporary styles like rock, jazz and fusion. Don't get me wrong; there will be no shortcuts here when it comes to modern music theory. As far as I'm concerned, all guitar players must have a good working knowledge of harmony and theory and the ability to read music, even if it's only simple chord charts.
Three Steps to Success Learning to improvise can be thought of as a three step process. The first step istypically the learning of scales. Using either the "key center" approach or the "modal" approach, students should learn at least a few useful fingerings of the major scale and be able to play them in all keys. Also, in this first step, players need to learn about harmony and theory to help them understand which scale fits over which chord. Armed with some theory knowledge, students can immediately begin playing over even difficult chord changes by simply switching to the "correct" scale or key center for the given chord.
Most players, after a period of time, will begin to find this first step limiting. They may say that they can't seem to make their solos sound like the chords, that they sound too "scaler." Moving on to step two, we introduce arpeggios as a tool to create chord sounds. Mixing arpeggios with our scales starts making our solos more harmonically intelligent.
Step three isthe "final frontier" of improvising, as we now start really learning music. So far, we've been using scales and arpeggios, but may not have been able to make our solos sound melodic. Now it's time to learn melodies. Most of us need to learn a repertoire of melodic lines to use when we improvise. Almost every one of our favorite players have, at one time or another, learned lines by copying recordings or transcriptions. I've met many student who tell me they don't want to sound like anyone else and feel they shouldn't copy other players.
They soon realize that the road to "originality" goes through the land of copying licks, phrasing and concepts used by favorite players. Eventually, these "influences" merge together into your own original style.
One last thing. A common misconception about improvising isthe phrase: "Playing what you hear." Many players say they do this, leading students to think that they simply make music up on the spot. What they are really saying they are doing is "playing what they know."
Improvising isthe spontaneous performance of ideas that come to you in the midst of soloing. You may not know ahead of time what you are going to play, but armed with scales, arpeggios, melodic ideas and theoretical concepts, you can playa creative and spontaneous improvised solo.

Unit 7: Using Harmonic Minor Arpeggios
How to use arpeggios when improvising can be a pretty big subject. Generally speaking, arpeggios are used to create chordal sounds (one note at a time) and add more melodic variety to musical lines. They're great for breaking up scales and for moving from one register to another. There are basically two approaches to choosing which arpeggio to use at a given time. The first isto use the arpeggio of the chord. For example, if the chord is C7, you simply playa C7 arpeggio; or if the chord isCm 11, use a Cm 11 arpeggio, etc. Thisapproach requires that you know an arpeggio for every chord. Think about how much work that could be. Not a very practical way to go. The other approach only requires that you know triad and seventh chord arpeggios.
The trade off isyou need to became a wizard at chord substitution. By superimposing various arpeggios over the basic chord you can create just about every chord sound imaginable. A quick example, that you may already know, is playing a Cmaj7 arpeggio over an Am7 chord. By doing this, you end up creating the sound of Am9 without actually playing an Am9 arpeggio. Thisconcept can be taken a long way allowing you some very sophisticated harmonic possibilities.
There are many ways to use the arpeggios of the harmonic minor scale. One approach isto think of all seven of the arpeggios as four-note "clusters of sound" that can be used anytime the scale can be used. For example, if you are playing over an E7, resolving to Am, experiment with superimposing all the arpeggios from A harmonic minor over the E7.The trick to this isyou need to be able to phrase the arpeggios in a way that still communicates to your listener the "sound" of E7. With practice, this can be a powerful way to create layers of harmonic minor sounds.
But, before we go crazy, randomly playing a bunch of arpeggios, let's first take a look at the chord sounds that are the result of playing the seven arpeggios over a dominant chord.
An important thing to remember isthat not all dominant 7th chords that we come across in tunes are V7 chords in a minor key. In fact, most dominant 7th chords we deal with are actually in major keys. The harmonic minor scale may not be the best choice in these situations (but feel free to experiment). Harmonic minor sounds best when played over a 7th chord resolving to a minor. The scale has a tendency to "lead" your listener signaling that a minor chord isto follow.
The following list shows the result of superimposing each of the seven arpeggios derived from the harmonic minor scale over a dominant chord. You will find that some sound stronger than others, but by connecting them together and mixing them with the scale, you'll eventually be able to use all seven easily.

Arpeggio Resulting Sound
Am(maj7) E7(#5,11)
Bm7 (b5) E7(b9,11)
Cmaj7(#5) E7(#5)
Dm7 E7(#5, b9, 11)
E7 E7
Fmaj7 E7(#5, b9,11)
G#dim7 E7(b9)

Here are a few useful arpeggio sequences that will help reinforce the two master arpeggio positions. Although I've indicated the name of each arpeggio, these lines are meant to be "thought of" as dominant (all A7).

Guitar Secrets - Harmonic Minor Revealed
Contents:

Unit 1: Harmonic Minor Scale History
Examples 1A - D
Examples 2 - 3

Unit 2: Fingerings of the Harmonic Minor Scale.
Example 4

Unit 3: How to learn and Practice the Scale
Examples 5A - D

Unit 4: Transposing the Scale to Other Keys.
Examples 6A - C .
Example 7 .

Unit 5: The Harmonic Minor Scale Harmony .
Examples 8A - B

Unit 6: Arpeggios From Harmonic Minor .
Examples 9A - G
Examples 10A - G .

Unit 7: Using Harmonic Minor Arpeggios.
Examples 11A - C ".

Unit 8: The Minor II - V - I ,
Examples 12A - F ,

Unit 9: Harmonic Minor in a Blues?
Example 13 .

Unit 10: The IV and VI Chords in Harmonic Minor
Example 14 .

Unit 11: The Diminished 7th Chord in Harmonic Minor .
Example 15

Unit 12: Static and Functioning Dominant 7ths .
Examples 16 - 17 .
Example 18

Unit 13:The Classic Use of the I Chord in Harmonic Minor,
Example 19

Unit 14: Some Special "Thinking" Tricks.
Examples 20A - D .
Examples 21A - B

Unit 15: Horizontal Harmonic Minor Scale Fingerings
Examples 22A - B
Examples 23A - D
Examples 24A - B

Unit 16: The licks .
Examples 25 - 26
Examples 27 - 29
Examples 30 - 31
Examples 32 - 33  

Price: €20,99
€20,99

GUITAR SECRETS SYMMETRICAL SCALES REVEALED Diminished Scale DON MOCK CD LIBRO TABLATURE SPARTITI

GUITAR SECRETS: SYMMETRICAL SCALES REVEALED, (Diminished and Whole Tone Scales). Don Mock. CD TAB.

CATEGORY: Guitar Method or Supplement
FORMAT: Book & CD
Learning how to play and use scales has always been a large part of every guitar player's practice schedule. Written from a player's perspective, this book doesn't get too in-depth into the history and classical theory of the scales, but focuses on their uses in contemporary styles such as blues, rock, fusion, and jazz. Includes tons of diminished and whole-tone lines, licks, and music examples; soloing and scale substitution from a player's perspective; and new sounds and ideas. Written in standard notation and Tablature.

Foreword
Welcome to Symmetrical Scales Revealed. Learning how to play and use scales has always been a large
part of every guitar player's practice schedule. Playershave spent countless hours practicing scales up
and down all over the guitar, sometimes with great success and sometimes with frustration as the end
result.
Thoseof you who know me from my books and videos or years at the Guitar Institute of Technology (Gin
know I've been involved in guitar education for a long time. I've seen hundreds of students struggle with
the same problems that I faced when going through the process of learning how to play and use scales.
After many years of experience, both playing and teaching, I've become a big believer in cutting through
the nonsense and getting to the point of it all, which is playing music.
The presentation and ideas in this book are definitely from a player's perspective. We're not going to get
too in-depth into the history and classical theory of the diminished and whole-tone scales. We'll focus more
on their usesin contemporary styleslike blues, rock, fusion, and jazz. Don't get me wrong: there will be no
shortcuts here when it comes to modern music theory. As far as I'm concerned, all guitar players must
have a good working knowledge of harmony and theory and the ability to read music, even if it's only simple
chord charts.
Three Steps to Success
Learning to improvise can be thought of as a three-step process. The first step istypically the learning of
scales. Usingeither the key center approach or the modal approach, students should learn at least a few
useful fingerings of the major scale and be able to play them in all keys.Also, in this first step, players need
to learn about harmony and theory to help understand which scale fits over which chord. Armed with
some theory knowledge, students can immediately begin playing over even difficult chord changes by
simply switching to the correct scale or key center for the given chord.
Most players after a period of time will begin to find this first step limiting. They may say that they can't
seem to make their solossound like the chords, that they sound too scalar. Moving on to step two, we
introduce arpeggios as a tool to create chord sounds. Mixing arpeggios with our scales starts making our
solos more harmonically intelligent.
Step three isthe final frontier of improvising, as we now start really learning music. So far we've been using
scales and arpeggios but may not been able to make our solossound melodic. Now it's time to learn
melodies. Most of us need to learn a repertoire of melodic lines to use when we improvise. Almost every
one of our favorite players has, at one time or another, learned linesby copying recordings or transcriptions.
I've met many students who tell me they don't want to sound like anyone else and feel they shouldn't
copy other players. They soon realize that the road to originality goes through the land of copying licks,
phrasing, and concepts used by favorite players. Eventually, these influences merge together into your
own original style.
One last thing: A common misconception about improvising isthe phrase "playing what you hear." Many
players say they do this, leading students to think that they simply make up music on the spot. What they
are really saying isthat they are playing what they know.
Improvising isthe spontaneous performance of ideas that come to you in the midst of soloing. You may
not know ahead of time what you are going to play, but armed with scales, arpeggios, melodic ideas,
and theoretical concepts, you can playa creative and spontaneous improvised solo.

 

Introduction
This book deals with the two most used symmetrical scales-the diminished and whole-tone. Symmetrical scales are best defined as having repetitive or equal-note spacing that repeats throughout the octave. For example, the whole-tone scale is exactly what the name indicates; it's a scale built entirely of whole tones The symmetry of a diminished scale is a pattern of alternating whole steps and half steps, four times per octave.
One great thing about symmetrical scales is that they are very guitar-friendly and easy to memorize. The fingerboard is a visual, graphic instrument similar to a slide-rule. In most cases, you can get by with just one fingering for each of these scales and then repeat the same fingering every two frets (whole-tone) or three frets (diminished) up or down the fingerboard, Guitar players can easily discover hundreds of unique melodic and harmonic ideas that are not as obvious on other instruments like keyboards, reeds, or brass.
Both of these scales are very useful and creative tools used by improvisers. Their simplicity can be deceptive; it's almost surprising how these simple scales can provide such a complex sound. In traditional jazz, they provide a contrasting flavor against functional dominant chords, Modern players exploit these scales to add an outside sound to contemporary jazz, rock, and even blues. In Symmetrical Scales Revealed you'll learn the most useful scale patterns and explore sequences and arpeggios within the scales. Next we'll learn the secrets of how to best use the scales, followed by several of my favorite melodic lines.
We'll begin each of the two sections by first learning some good fingerings for each scale. If you already know a fingering or two, stick with them or feel free to modify any of the fingerings here to suit your technique and style. The ultimate goal isto be able to play the particular scale anywhere on the guitar in any key.
One more thing about the fingerings: You are limited only by the lowest and highest notes on the guitar. Think of scales as having no beginning and no end. Don't be too concerned with the bottom or top notes of each individual pattern, You'll find that each has a different starting and ending note because of the natural range of the strings.
SCales are simply a row of notes, and you should learn to control the scale by being able to start and end on any note. Eventually, individual scale fingerings will begin to blend together into larger patterns until finally the whole fingerboard is under your control!
How to Get the Most Out of This Book
The best way to get the most out of this book is to scan through each chapter first. Get a feel about where and what the various topics are and if they contain information you already know. You should read every page carefully, but it's okay to start with any section in the book that interests you

 

Guitar Secrets - Symmetrical Scales Reveale
Contents:

SECTION I: INTRODUCTION
Tuning Notes

Unit 1: Modes of the Diminished and Whole-Tone Scales
Examples 

Unit 2: Static and Functioning Dominant 7ths 
Examples 

SECTION II: THE DIMINISHED SCALE
Unit 3: Fingerings of the Diminished Scale 
Examples 

Unit 4: How to Learn and Practice the Diminished Scale
C7 Practice Track

Unit 5: Diminished Scale Sequences 
Examples 

Unit 6: Diminished Arpeggios,
Examples 

Unit 7: Using the Diminished Scale,
Examples 

Unit 8: Six-Note Diminished Shapes 
Examples 

Unit 9: Major Triads in the Diminished Scale 
Examples 

Unit 10: Using the Diminished Scale Over Static Chords ..
Examples 

SECTION III: THE WHOLE-TONE SCALE

Unit 11: Fingerings of the Whole-Tone Scaie,
Examples 

Unit 12: Whole-Tone Scale Sequences
Examples 

Unit 13: Whole-Tone Arpeggios
Examples 

Unit 14: Using the Whole-Tone Scale
Examples 

Unit 15: Modern Uses of the Whole-Tone - Static Chords 
Examples 

Unit 16: The Fingerboard - Symmetrical Scales Geometric Playground ,
Examples 

Unit 17: Diminished and Whole-Tone Lines 
Examples 

 

Price: €26,99
€26,99

MELODIC ARPEGGIOS FOR LEAD GUITAR MARK GALBO LIBRO CD TABLATURE SPARTITI SOSTITUZIONI ACCORDI

MELODIC ARPEGGIOS FOR LEAD GUITAR, M. Galbo. CD TAB.

An arpeggio is simply playing the notes of a chord, one after another, in a melodic fashion. Piano, bass, string, and horn players routinely find the study of arpeggios a staple of their learning process. But, somehow, guitarists often manage to skip over this essential musical building block.
This book is designed to demystify arpeggios and demonstrate their application in a musical and easy-to-understand format. All of the material is presented within the context of various 'Jam Tracks' which allow students to immediately apply new knowledge and hear for themselves why arpeggios are essential to their playing.

All of the music examples are presented in standard notation and tablature so there is no need to read music. Also includes a special demonstration and playalong CD.

Price: €26,99
€26,99

MODES FOR GUITAR-MUSICIANS INSTITUTE Tom Kolb CD TABLATURE Ionico-dorico-frigio-lidio-misolidio-eolio-locrio

MODES FOR GUITAR, MUSICIANS INSTITUTE Tom Kolb. CD TABLATURE

Publisher: Musicians Institute Press

In this one-on-one lesson, MI instructor Tom Kolb unravels the mystery of the modes, giving guitarists a complete approach to soloing and a thorough, hands-on explanation of Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian. He also covers: melodic minor, harmonic minor and the blues scale; soloing over diatonic and modal progressions; superimposing modes; patterns, progressions, licks; and much more. The accompanying CD includes 83 full-band tracks.

 

The modes of the major scale have long been a fascinating subject for guitarists. But at the same time, they can be a great source of confusion and misunderstanding. The purpose of this book is to unravel the mysteries of the modes and to guide you through the world of their applications. We'll take an in-depth look at how modes can be used in various soloing situations, as a source for creating riffs, and as tools for writing unique chord progressions. Each chapter contains suggested fretboard patterns, licks, and musical examples, as well as valuable insights into each mode's unique application. Each example is demonstrated on the accompanying CD. There is also a jam track featuring a "play-along progression" for each mode, so you can practice applying the modes in an improvisational setting. As a special bonus, in the final chapter, we'll explore some of the modes of other popular scales. Although it's highly recommended that you start at the beginning of this book and work your way through to the end, if you prefer, you can jump in anywhere, especially if you're already familiar with a mode or two. You can always refer back to the first chapter, "Theory of the Modes," if you find yourself getting confused. Every musical example in this book is demonstrated on the accompanying CD. Tracks with a full rhythm section are played twice-once at normal speed and then again at half speed. For the normal-speed examples, the featured guitar is mixed hard right. This allows you to play along either with the entire mix, or, by adjusting the balance to the left, with just the rhythm section. Don't forget-there's a jam track for each mode, so you can practice applying what you've just learned in an improvisational setting. You can work on soloing all over the neck with the various finger patterns provided, experiment with the musical examples presented in the text, and apply the concepts presented in the "Odds and Ends" section at the end of each chapter. Use Track. of the CD to tune your guitar.

Price: €16,99
€16,99

PENTATONIC SCALES FOR GUITAR The Essential Guide Chad Johnson CD TABLATURE HAL LEONARD

 

PENTATONIC SCALES FOR GUITAR. The Essential Guide. CD TABLATURE

Pentatonic Scales for Guitar

The Essential Guide
Series: Guitar Educational
Format: Softcover with CD - TAB
Author: Chad Johnson

This book provides the pentatonic scale fingerings, diagrams, lessons and licks that every guitarist needs to know. It covers: major and minor pentatonic scale patterns in all positions; licks in the styles of Chuck Berry, Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, B.B. King, Jimmy Page and other great artists; and much more.

The CD includes 90 full-band demos for listening and/or play-along. 
Each example is played twice: once at normal tempo and once slower for closer examination. The book is in standard notation and tablature.

Inventory #HL 00695699
ISBN: 9780634046469
UPC: 073999956993
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
40 pages

Price: €18,00
€18,00

MONSTER SCALES AND MODES, A COMPLETE COMPILATION OF SCALES, MODES, EXOTIC SCALES, THEORY. TABLATURE

MONSTER SCALE AND MODES, A COMPLETE. Diagrammi di scale e modi raccolti da tutto il mondo. TAB.

By Dave Celentano
Series: Instructional
Publisher: Centerstream Publications TAB
Composer: Dave Celentano

This book is a complete compilation of scales, modes, exotic scales, and theory. It covers the most common and exotic scales, theory on how they're constructed and practical applications. No prior music theory is necessary since every section is broken down and explained very clearly. 48 pages.

Price: €11,50
€11,50

ROCK LEAD PERFORMANCE-MUSICIANS INSTITUTE-CD TABLATURE-Danny Gill-Nick Nolan-modulations

 

ROCK LEAD PERFORMANCE, MUSICIANS INSTITUTE. Tech, scales, soloing for guitar. centro tonale, i modi, le scale, bluesy, arpeggi, jam, 74 Esempi audio di rock song, con Nolan e Gill. CD TABLATURE

Rock Lead Performance
Techniques, Scales and Soloing Concepts for Guitar
Series: Musicians Institute Press
Publisher: Musicians Institute Press
Format: Softcover with CD - TAB
Composer: Danny Gill
Composer: Nick Nolan

Techniques, scales and soloing concepts for guitar complete with a CD with over 70 full-demo tracks; in-depth study of modes; soloing over chord changes and modulations; harmonic minor, diminished and other scales; blues-based music; and much more!

Inventory #HL 00695278
ISBN: 9780793590582
UPC: 073999952780
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
80 pages

Price: €20,99
€20,99

SCALES-over 70 scales-fingering diagrams-CHERRY LANE Joe Charupakorn TABLATURE LIBRO CHITARRA

SCALES, over 70 scales tra modali, esotiche, pentatoniche, simmetriche, bebop. enigmatiche, e molte altre. 220 pagine. TAB.

Composer: Joe Charupakorn.
Find any scale quickly and with ease! This book presents over 70 scales from bebop scales to synthetic scales to exotic scales from around the globe. Each scale is displayed on every possible string from lowest to highest with numerous fingering options. This is the ideal book for beginners seeking a well-organized, easy-to-follow guide to last a lifetime and consummate professionals who need a reference of scales for every possible musical situation. No music reading is required, as each scale is shown in diagram form. 224 pages.

Price: €21,99
€21,99

THE ART OF SOLO GUITAR 2 Jody FISHER LIBRO CD TABLATURE CHITARRA

THE ART OF SOLO GUITAR 2, J. Fisher. CD TAB.

By Jody Fisher

In this two-book series, popular clinician and author Jody Fisher clarifies and simplifies the art of creating an arrangement and improvising as a solo guitarist. In his easy-to-understand and enjoyable style, this master of solo guitar teaches all of the theory, technique and arranging skills students need to start a lifelong journey as a solo guitarist. Book 2 focuses on more advanced arranging techniques and adding the element of improvisation to your solo work. There is also lots of information about ornamentation, various musical and stylistic feels, and many aesthetic considerations.

Price: €29,99
€29,99
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