HAL LEONARD

VIVALDI CLASSICAL GUITAR MUSIC OF Joseph Harris TABLATURE GARDELLINO CHITARRA LIBRO SPARTITI

 

VIVALDI, CLASSICAL GUITAR MUSIC OF. TABLATURE

CONCERT MASTERWORKS

Classical Guitar Music of Vivaldi
Series: Creative Concepts Publishing
Publisher: Creative Concepts TAB
Artist: Antonio Vivaldi
Arranger: Joseph Harris

Features 31 pieces by Antonio Vivaldi arranged for solo guitar with tablature. Includes historical notes, performance suggestions, explanation of ornaments, and more.

Inventory #HL 00315187
ISBN: 9781569221945
UPC: 073999158755
Publisher Code: 074090
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
80 pages

About Classical Guitar Music Of Vivaldi - Guitar Solo
By Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741), arranged by Joseph Harris. Guitar tablature songbook for guitar. 80 pages.
With standard guitar notation, guitar tablature, introductory text and instructional text. Baroque. 9x12 inches.

Features 31 pieces by Antonio Vivaldi arranged for solo guitar with tablature. Includes historical notes, performance suggestions, explanation of ornaments, and more.

For many years remembered only for his contribution of hundreds of violin concertos, Antonio Vivaldi is regarded today as a key musical figure of the Italian Baroque. Although his most visible and enduring influence was indeed in the development of the solo concerto, Vivaldi was also admired in his day as a composer of excellent chamber music, a stunning violinist and a popular composer of Italian opera. This composer of "The Four Seasons" was a bold and impetuous individual who managed to focus his musical impulses in a unique voice that was consistent yet expressive. Vivaldi was born in Venice in 1678 and trained for the priesthood, but ended up practicing this vocation for only a brief time. Vivaldi served for nearly forty years (from 1703 until just before his death in 1741) as musical director of the Conservatorio dell'Ospedale della Pieta, one of four girls' orphanages in Venice. The Ospedale provided outstanding musical instruction and under Vivaldi's direction created quite a musical sensation. Vivaldi's tasks at the Ospedale included teaching private lessons, composing music for both concerts and church services, repairing musical instruments and commissioning works from other composers for concerts at the Ospedale. Vivaldi was extremely prolific, composing over 50 operas, 90 sonatas and 450 concertos. Despite the apparent ease with which he could produce a composition (he once boasted he could compose a piece faster than it could be copied), Vivaldi is criticized sometimes for being too predictable. The twentieth century Italian composer Luigi Dallapiccola once asserted that Vivaldi did not compose 450 separate concertos, but wrote the same concerto 450 times. Whereas during the Baroque many musicians believed that the particular intent of a composition (church, chamber or theatre) should dictate its musical language, Vivaldi's style varied little between genres and even between mediums. His vocal music and instrumental music share similar musical characteristics, as do his sacred and secular works. Furthermore, Vivaldi's compositional style remained remarkably consistent throughout his career and evolved very little. The only major variances one finds are in surface details, such as melodic contour, which tended to reflect public tastes. However, it is a tribute to Vivaldi's skill as a composer that within such a limited musical vocabulary he exhibited a virtually inexhaustible variety of invention.

Sonatas for Violin, Op. 2
The 12 Sonatas for Violin, Op. 2 were Vivaldi's first solo sonatas. The Sonatas were published in Italy in 1709 and dedicated to Frederick IV of Denmark on the occasion of his visit to Venice. For the Sonatas, Vivaldi drew upon models of Arcangelo Corelli, a conservative Italian composer whose works are tidily constructed, yet highly expressive. Vivaldi's Sonatas are a composite of church and chamber styles, demonstrating his tendency to blur boundaries between genres. In the Sonatas, dance movements intermingle with abstract movements (those with only tempo designations). Baroque dances of the Italian variety differ considerably from their French or German equivalents. The slight differences in the names of dances (for example, compare the Italian giga to the French gigue) do not signify nationality only, but salient musical traits. Whereas the French gigue is a lively, bouncy dance in an imitative texture, the Italian giga has a more restrained sense of pulse, a less rhythmically active bass line and little or no imitation between voices. The Italian gavotta lacks the characteristic two upbeats and musette-like middle section of the French gavotte. The Italian corrente is faster and more "running" in character than the French courante. Also, the French courante may emphasize dotted rhythms and an alternation between duple and triple meter, while the corrente is more rhythmically consistent and metrically stable.

Sonata No.3
In the Adagio (found on page 7), the bass line should be played with a warm tone, especially in areas where it is exposed (as in the opening and in measure 9). To achieve a warm tone on the guitar, play with the right hand close to the fretboard and strike the string with the side of the thumb, using as much flesh as possible. The Giga (found on page 8) should be played dynamically strong throughout and in a lightning fast tempo.

Sonata No.6
The Preludio (found on page 12) should sound very elegant and graceful. Exaggerate the dotted rhythms by playing the long notes longer and the short notes shorter. The Giga (found on page 16) should be played in a moderately fast tempo. Count two beats per measure, not four, to give the piece a stronger and more stable sense of forward motion

Sonata No.7
The tempo of the Corrente (found on page 19) should be very fast. However, in areas where the bass line becomes more active (especially in mm. 17-21), make sure that neither voice breaks down.

Sonata No.9
The Preludio (found on page 23) is an energetic and dramatic piece. The movement contains elements of a "learned" style, which show off a composer's contrapuntal skills. Be sure to emphasize the points of imitation (as in the first few measures).

Sonata No. 11
The abundance of syncopated rhythms presents an interesting technical problem for the solo performer in the Gavotta (found on page 28). In order toconvey the meter clearly, keep the tempo steady and count two beats per measure. Hold on to notes with the left hand for as long as possible before fingering new notes.

Sonatas for One or Two Violins, Ope 5
The Six Sonatas, Op. 5 were first published in 1716. By this time, Vivaldi had chosen a new publisher, Etienne Roger in Amsterdam. There were at least two significant reasons for the switch: superior printing methods and an increased demand for the music of Vivaldi and other Italians in northern Europe. The Sonatas, Op. 5 were actually engraved and published at Roger's own expense. Such a practice was quite rare in Vivaldi's time and testifies to his immense popularity.

Sonata No. 13
The Sarabanda (found on page 30) lacks the lasciviously strong accent on the second beat characteristic of the Spanish sarabande. Keep the tempo slow, the meter even and play with as much vibrato as possible. Sonata No. 14

For the Gavotta (found on page 32), the left-hand slurs (as in mm. 7-9 and 39-41) may require some extra attention during practice. Isolate each slur and treat it as a trilling exercise. Devote a few minutes each day to these passages until they sound crisp and clear.

Sonata No. 16
In the Preludio (found on page 35), exaggerate the dotted rhythms and apply vibrato liberally. Because of the slow tempo, it will be necessary to think ahead and be aware of the melody's direction and shape. At some point, you may want to do a simple phrase analysis of the Preludio. Break the piece into small phrases, study how they relate to one another and then group them into longer phrases. The longer the phrases you envision, the better the sense of forward motion you will convey.

Sonata No. 18
The Air-Minuet (found on page 38) demonstrates an ambiguity in Vivaldi's choice of titles for movements. The designation "Air" suggests the vocal-like quality of the melody. The piece is also an instrumental dance movement, containing the clear four-bar phrasing and clear cadences typical of a minuet. Overall, the piece should sound stately, yet singing.

II cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione, Op. 8
The Concertos, Op. 8 were first published in 1725 and dedicated to the Bohemian Count Wenzeslaus von Morzin. The first four concertos are collectively known as "The Four Seasons." A significant feature in each of these concertos is the inclusion of an explanatory sonnet, each line of poetry corresponding to a particular passage in the music.

Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'invenzione, Op. 8
Pubblicati per la prima volta nel 1725, i primi 4 concerti sono conosciuti come "Le quattro stagioni".

TABLE OF CONTENTS: 
Historical Notes & Performance Suggestions
Explanation of Ornaments
Adagio Sonata for Violin, Op. 2, No.3
Giga from Sonata for Violin, Ope 2, No. 3
Preludio from Sonata for Violin, Ope 2, No. 6
Giga from Sonata for Violin, Ope 2, No. 6
Corrente from Sonata for Violin, Ope 2, No. 7
Largo from Concerto for Flute, Op. 10, NO.3 (''il Gardellino") ,
Preludio from Sonata for Violin, Op. 2, No. 9 ,
Gavotta from Sonata for Violin, Ope 2, No. 11
Sarabanda from Sonata for Violin, Ope 5, No. 13
Gavotta from Sonata for Violin, Ope 5, No. 14 .
Preludio from Sonata for Violin, Ope 5, No. 16 .
Air-Menuet from Sonata for Two Violins, Op. 5, No. 18 .
Allegro non molto From the Four Seasons, Op. 8, NO.2 (Summer) .
Largo From The Four Seasons, Op. 8, NO.4 (Winter) .
Affettuoso From Sonata for Flute, RV 48 .
Allegro assai From Sonata for Flute, RV 48 .
Allegro Sonata for Flute, RV48 .
Preludio from Sonata for Flute, RV 49 .
Sarabanda from Sonata for Flute, RV 49 .
Siciliana from Sonata for Flute, RV 49 .
Preludio from Sonata for Recorder, RV 52 .
Allemanda from Sonata for Recorder, RV 52 .
Aria di Giga from Sonata for Recorder, RV 52 .
Largo from Concerto for Lute and Two Violins, RV93 .
Largo from Concerto for Flute and Oboe, RV95 ("La Pastorella") .
Andante from Concerto for Flute, RV429 .
Grave from Concerto for Violin and Organ, RV541 .
Allegro alla Francese Violin and Oboe, RV 543
Largo from Concerto for Oboe and Violin, RV 548 .
Largo from Concerto for Flute, Op. 10, No.4 .
Largo from Sonata for Musette, Vielle, Flute, Oboe or Violin, Op. 13, No.6

Catalog #07- 4090
ISBN# 1-56922-194-4
CREATIVE CONCEPTS PUBLISHING CORPORATION
Creative Concepts Publishing Corp.

Price: €19,99
€19,99

THE ROOTS OF JAZZ, The songs and licks that made it happen. Fred Sokolow. CD TABLATURE

THE ROOTS OF JAZZ. CD TABLATURE
The songs and licks that made it happen. 

Dinah
East Of The Sun (And West Of The Moon)
Honeysuckle Rose
I'll Remember April
Rose Room
Yesterdays

The Roots of Jazz Guitar
Series: Guitar Collection
Format: Softcover with CD - TAB
Composer: Fred Sokolow
Inventory #HL 00699082
ISBN: 9780793577347
UPC: 073999990829
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
64 pages

A complete survey of jazz guitar, its pioneers and how it developed. Includes: six note-for-note transcriptions of famous standards pivotal to the genre; instruction in the essential playing styles; the history and development of jazz guitar; biographies of the pioneering artists; a recording of the songs, exercises, and licks; and more.

Songs include:

- Dinah (Eddie Lang)

- East of the Sun (And West of the Moon) (Barney Kessel)

- Honeysuckle Rose (Charlie Christian)

- I'll Remember April (George Van Eps)

- Rose Room (Django Reinhardt)

- Yesterdays (Wes Montgomery).

64 pages.

 

MUSCAL INTRODUCTION
A LOOK AT THE ROOTS OF JAZZ GUITAR
At the beginning of the twentieth century, New Orleans bands began combining two traditions: They
borrowed some repertoire from European bands, which often included strings, horns, and a piano,
and performed classical pieces, polkas, mazurkas, sentimental ballads and waltzes. They also imitated
Southern string bands, sometimes called "spasm bands," which consisted of guitars, banjos, violins,
mandolins and string bass, and who played ragtime, blues, jigs and reels. New Orleans bandleaders
like Buddy Bolden and Kid Ory used all these instruments and fused the musical styles, and
their music began to be identified as "jazz."
Johnny St. Cyr, who played with Kid Ory, Jelly Roll Morton and many of the New Orleans bands,
was typical of the first jazz guitarists: he was a four-string banjo player who played guitar as a sideline.
Seldom soloing, he strummed four-beats-to-the-bar and provided bands with a rhythmic backbone.
In pre-microphone days, banjo was audible over loud horns; guitar did not cut it. But in the
'20s, as phonograph recordings gained popularity, the guitar became more prominent. It was easier
to record than banjo.

HOT JAZZ: GUITARIN THE '20s
Jazz was the hot popular dance music of the decade that is often called "The Jazz Age."
Accomplished pickers like Roy Smeck, Nick Lucas and Lonnie Johnson performed the first melodic
guitar solos on records in the 1920s. These versatile players played popular tunes, blues and
whatever the traffic would bear, sometimes fingerpicking but usually flatpicking scales, chords and
arpeggios. But most performing guitarists in jazz bands simply strummed chords, until Eddie Lang
came along.
Lang performed with many of the popular ensembles of his day, including the Goldkette Orchestra,
Red Nichols and the Five Pennies, Paul Whiteman and Bing Crosby. One of the first studio guitar
aces, he accompanied most of the stars of his era on records. Live and in the studio, Lang combined
rhythmic strumming with a melodic soloing style, opening up new possibilities for a whole generation
of guitarists. When he died, in 1933, he left a recorded legacy of ensemble work, solos and duets
with Lonnie Johnson and with lifelong musical companion, violinist Joe Venuti. He inspired countless
jazz banjoists to play guitar, and to be melodic as well as rhythmic. The guitar became a soloing
voice in jazz.

THE '30s SWING ERA
During the swing or big-band era, guitarists in popular swing orchestras played rhythm. Count
Basie's guitarist, Freddie Greene, never played a solo. Some guitarists like Carl Kress, Dick
McDonough, George Van Eps and George Barnes followed Eddie Lang's lead and created beautiful,
harmonically rich, chord-based soloing styles. They recorded solos, duets and small ensemble "listening"
(not dancing) records for jazz afficionados. Like Lang, they usually played Gibson L-5 archtop guitars.
Meanwhile, inspired players like Snoozer Quinn, Teddy Bunn and Oscar Aleman (who played an allmetal
National guitar) helped develop the art of single-note jazz soloing throughout the '30s. But the
creative genius who caught most listeners' and players' ears was the Belgian gypsy, Django Reinhardt.
The first international jazz star, Reinhardt rose to fame playing with his "quintette" in Paris. Although
his own style and his duets with violinist Stephane Grappelli were admittedly based on the
LangNenuti model, he took single-note guitar soloing to new heights. His ad-lib improvisations were
fiery, tender, incredibly inventive, and he always swung. Budding country, blues and jazz guitarists
memorized his solos.
 

DINAH, EDDIE LANG

Born into a musical Italian family October 25, 1902 in Philadelphia, Salvatore Massaro studied violin
and music theory at age seven. By his teens he was playing four- and six-string banjo in pop
orchestras, often with his boyhood friend, violinist Joe Venuti. Venuti claims Lang was self-taught,
and the only guitarist he recalls Lang mentioning as an inspiration was Segovia. When asked who
Lang imitated, Venuti said "Who else was there? Eddie started it all."
In 1924, using the name of boyhood baseball hero Eddie Lang, he joined the Mound City Blue
Blowers, a sort of jug band, as a guitarist. The recordings he made with them demonstrate why
Lang is said to have legitimized guitar as a jazz instrument: instead of simply strumming the chords,
he played several chords per measure, and peppered his backup with bass runs, passing tones,
arpeggios, single-string fills, bluesy string-bending and harmonics.
In the next several years, Lang was increasingly in demand as a performer. He played with the big
bands of Jean Goldkette (where he befriended Bix Beiderbecke), Roger Kahn, Adrian Rollini, and
Paul Whiteman. Although he was capable of reading music, Lang played by ear. During his tenure
with Whiteman, he kept a piece of paper the size of a business card in his pocket that contained on
it (in markings only decipherable by Lang) everything he needed to know about Whiteman's musical
repertoire. When Whiteman's singer, Bing Crosby, went solo, Lang became Crosby's guitarist and
appeared with him in the 1932 film, The Big Broadcast.
One of the first versatile studio guitarists, Lang recorded with Red Nichols and His Five Pennies,
Cliff Edwards (known as Ukulele Ike), AI Jolson, Ruth Etting, Sophie Tucker, the Boswell Sisters,
Emmett Miller and a host of blues singers, including Bessie Smith, Victoria Spivey and Texas
Alexander. His technique was most audible when he recorded solo (often composing his own
songs), and in duets with Joe Venuti or with small ensembles such as Venuti's Blue Four or Blue
Five. These were probably the first listening (not dancing) jazz recordings. Using the name "Blind
Willie Dunn," he recorded memorable duets with guitarist Lonnie Johnson, the other guitar giant of
the '20s, who, like Lang, played both blues and jazz.
By 1933, when Lang died of complications from a tonsillectomy, most jazz bands had switched from
banjo to guitar, and most guitarists were playing the archtop, F-hole instrument Lang preferred.
Using blues and classical techniques, he inspired the first generation of jazz guitarists, most of
whom agree: Lang laid the groundwork for jazz guitar.

PERFORMANCE NOTES
"Dinah" features Lang's backup and lead styles. It has a typical pop song structure, and in 1928 Joe
Venuti's Blue Four, recording for Okeh Records in New York City, gave it the usual jazz treatment
(see as follows). Released in Europe by Parlaphone, it was one of the "chamber jazz" sides that
made Venuti and Lang internationally famous. The quartet consisted of Venuti, Lang, a pianist and
baritone sax.

SONG STRUCTURE AND THE JAZZ TREATMENT
Like many pop tunes, "Dinah" has an AABA structure:
• An eight-bar section ("A part") is played twice in a row, with a slightly different ending the second time.
• An eight-bar bridge follows (that's "B").
• The "A part" is repeated.
 

Price: €16,99
€16,99

BLUES & ROCK HARMONICA GLENN WEISER LIBRO CD BASI PENTATONICA IMPROVVISAZIONE

BLUES & ROCK HARMONICA, G. Weiser. CD

Series: Harmonica
Publisher: Centerstream Publications
Medium: Softcover with CD
Artist: Glenn Weiser

By Glenn Weiser Book/CD package for beginners to learn blues and rock improvisation. Includes explanations of scales, modes, chords & other essential elements of music. The 60-minute CD features riffs & solos plus demonstrations and a blues jam to play along with. Goin' Down The Road. 96 pages.

Price: €24,99
€24,99

CHORDS FOR JAZZ GUITAR The Complete Guide to Comping Chord Melody and Chord Soloing CD TABLATURE libro

CHORDS FOR JAZZ GUITAR, The Complete Guide to Comping, Chord Melody and Chord Soloing. CD TABLATURE

Chords for Jazz Guitar
The Complete Guide to Comping, Chord Melody and Chord Soloing
Series: Guitar Educational
Format: Softcover with CD
Author: Charlton Johnson

This book/CD pack will teach you how to play jazz chords all over the fretboard in a variety of styles and progressions. It covers: voicings, progressions, jazz chord theory, comping, chord melody, chord soloing, voice leading and many more topics. The CD includes 98 full-band demo tracks. No tablature. 149 pages.

Inventory #HL 00695706
ISBN: 9780634047145
UPC: 073999793710
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
152 pages

Price: €26,99
€26,99

'90S ROCK GUITAR PLAY-ALONG VOLUME 6 CD BOOK TABLATURE CHITARRA LIBRO SPARTITI BASI

'90S ROCK GUITAR PLAY-ALONG VOLUME 6. Basi: Are You Gonna Go My Way -Come Out and Play -I'll Stick Around -Know Your Enemy -Man in the Box -Outshined -Smells like Teen Spirit -Under the Bridge. CD TAB.

The Guitar Play-Along Series will assist you in learning to play your favorite songs quickly and easily. Just follow the tab, listen to the CD to hear how the guitar should sound, and then play along using the separate backing tracks. The melody and lyrics are also included in the book in case you want to sing, or to simply help you follow along. The audio CD is playable on any CD player. For PC and Mac computer users, the CD is enhanced so you can adjust the recording to any tempo without changing pitch! Includes 8 songs, 64 pages.

Price: €21,99
€21,99

POP/ROCK GUITAR PLAY-ALONG Vol. 12. CD TABLATURE

POP/ROCK GUITAR PLAY-ALONG Vol. 12. 867-5309/Jenny -Every Breath You Take -Money for Nothing -Rebel, Rebel -Run to You -Ticket to Ride -Wonderful Tonight -You Give Love a Bad Name. CD TAB.

Series: Guitar Play-Along
Softcover with CD - TAB
Artist: Various

The Guitar Play-Along Series will help you play your favorite songs quickly and easily! Just follow the tab, listen to the CD to hear how the guitar should sound, and then play along using the separate backing tracks. The melody and lyrics are also included in the book in case you want to sing, or to simply help you follow along. The audio CD is playable on any CD player. For PC and Mac computer users, the CD is enhanced so you can adjust the recording to any tempo without changing pitch!

This volume includes 8 songs:

867-5309/Jenny -TOOMY TUTONE
Every Breath You Take -THE POLICE
Money For Nothing -DIRE STRAITS
Rebel, Rebel -DAVID BOWIE
Run To You -BRYAN ADAMS
Ticket To Ride -THE BEATLES
Wonderful Tonight -ERIC CLAPTON
You Give Love A Bad Name -BON JOVI

48 pages.

Price: €14,95
€14,95

THE BEST OF SOUL GUITAR SIGNATURE LICKS CD TABLATURE LIBRO SPARTITI Knock On Wood

THE BEST OF SOUL GUITAR. SIGNATURE. CD TAB.

A Step-by-Step Breakdown of Guitar Styles and Techniques
Series: Signature Licks Guitar
Softcover with CD - TAB
Author: Dave Rubin
This book/CD pack by noted guitar expert Dave Rubin lets you explore the trademark riffs, solos and compositions of 15 songs by soul guitar masters such as James Brown, Sam Cooke, Albert King, Wilson Pickett, Sam & Dave, Otis Redding and others. Songs examined are:

Born Under A Bad Sign
Cold Sweat, Pt. 1
Get Up (I Feel Like Being) A Sex Machine
Green Onions
I'll Come Running Back To You
In The Midnight Hour
It's Gonna Work Out Fine
Knock On Wood
Land Of A Thousand Dances
Theme From Shaft
(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay
Soul Man
Time Is Tight
Walkin' The Dog
Wrap It Up

64 pages

Price: €27,99
€27,99

R&B GUITAR BIBLE Recorded Version TABLATURE MY BABE-GET UP (I FEEL LIKE BEING) A SEX MACHINE

R&B GUITAR BIBLE. TAB.

Series: Guitar Recorded Version TAB
Artist: Various
A divine collection of 35 R&B classics:

About Hal Leonard Guitar Recorded Versions
Guitar Recorded Versions are note-for-note transcriptions of guitar music taken directly off recordings. This series, one of the most popular in print today, features some of the greatest guitar players and groups from blues, rock, and heavy metal. Guitar Recorded Versions are transcribed by the best transcribers in the business. Every book contains notes and tablature.

Contents:
SHOT GUN PERFORMED BY JR.WALKER AND THE ALL STARS
BUT IT'S ALRIGHT PERFORMED BY J.J. JACKSON
GET UP (I FEEL LIKE BEING) A SEX MACHINE PERFORMED BY JAMES BROWN
I GOT THE FEELIN' PERFORMED BY JAMES BROWN
PLEASE ACCEPT MY LOVE PERFORMED BY B.B. KING
I JUST WANT TO CELEBRATE PERFORMED BY RARE EARTH
LOVE ROLLERCOASTER PERFORMED BY OHIO PLAYERS
FIRE PERFORMED BY OHIO PLAYERS
PICK UP THE PIECES PERFORMED BY AVERAGE WHITE BAND
SHINING STAR PERFORMED BY EARTH, WIND AND FIRE
SUPER FREAK PERFORMED BY RICK JAMES
BOOGIE OOGIE OOGIE PERFORMED BY A TASTE OF HONEY
PAIN IN MY HEART PERFORMED BY OTIS REDDING
BOOM BOOM (OUT GO THE LIGHTS) PERFORMED BY LITTLE WALTER
DANCING IN THE STREET PERFORMED BY MARTHA REEVES AND THE VANDELLAS
I CAN'T HELP MYSELF (SUGAR PIE, HONEY BUNCH) PERFORMED BY FOUR TOPS
I GOT YOU (I FEEL GOOD) PERFORMED BY JAMES BROWN
I HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE PERFORMED BY MARVIN GAYE
I SECOND THAT EMOTION PERFORMED BY SMOKEY ROBINSON
I WISH PERFORMED BY STEVIE WONDER
IT'S YOUR THING PERFORMED BY THE ISLEY BROTHERS
MUSTANG SALLY PERFORMED BY BUDDY GUY
MY BABE PERFORMED BY LITTLE WALTER
MY GIRL PERFORMED BY SMOKEY ROBINSON
NADINE (IS IT YOU) PERFORMED BY CHUCK BERRY
NO PARTICULAR PLACE TO GO PERFORMED BY CHUCK BERRY
PAPA WAS A ROLLIN' STONE PERFORMED BY THE TEMPTATIONS
PAPA'S GOT A BRAND NEW BAG PERFORMED BY JAMES BROWN
REACH OUT, I'LL BE THERE PERFORMED BY FOUR TOPS
ROCKET 88 PERFORMED BY JACKIE BRENSTON
SIR DUKE PERFORMED BY STEVIE WONDER
THIS MASQUERADE PERFORMED BY GEORGE BENSON
BRICK HOUSE PERFORMED BY THE COMMODORES
YOU'VE REALLY GOT A HOLD ON ME PERFORMED BY SMOKEY ROBINSON AND THE MIRACLES
(YOUR LOVE KEEPS LIFTING ME) HIGHER AND HIGHER PERFORMED BY JACKIE WILSON

Price: €29,99
€29,99

KOCH GREG, RHYTHM RIFFS Over 200 Riffs in All Styles Hal Leonard Guitar Method CD TABLATURE DOMINANT 7TH

Rhythm Riffs, Over 200 Riffs in All Styles Hal Leonard Guitar Method

LIBRO PER CHITARRA CON CD E TABLATURE

Series: Guitar Method
Format: Softcover with CD
Arranger: Greg Koch

Also available:
Lead Licks – 00697345

Inventory #HL 00697346
ISBN: 9780634048487
UPC: 073999973464
Width: 9.0"
Length: 12.0"
48 pages

 

KOCH GREG, RHYTHM RIFFS. 200 riffs. CD TABLATURE

Over 200 Riffs in All Styles Hal Leonard Guitar Method
Series: Guitar Method
Medium: Softcover with CD
Arranger: Greg Koch

Are you tired of playing the same riffs over and over again? Or maybe you just don't know what to play during your solo? Loaded with new ideas, Rhythm Riffs gives you the tools to spice up your rhythm guitar playing and make your parts more authentic. This book/CD pack covers rock, blues, jazz, country, funk and "outside" styles. It gives you major, minor and dominant 7th riffs for nearly any musical situation - over 200 riffs in all! The CD includes each riff played at full speed and at a slower practice tempo. 48 pages.

INTRODUCTION

RIFFS MAJOR
RIFFS MINOR
RIFFS DOMINANT 7TH.
12 -BAR VARIATIONS
TUNING

INTRODUCTION

Do you find yourself reaching for the same chord shapes again and again when you pick up a guitar? What if someone asks you to "play something bluesy" on a G chord-do you know what to do? How would you like to spice up your rhythm guitar playing, make your parts more authentic, or maybe just get some new ideas? Rhythm Riffs is a unique book designed for the intermediate to advanced guitarist to increase your playing vocabulary exponentially. Whether you're playing in a band, writing songs, accompanying others, or just jamming with friends, there's so much more you can do-other than strum!-when playing rhythm guitar.

ABOUT THE RIFFS
What is a "riff?" A riff is a rhythmic theme that can contain single notes or chords. What goes into a riff can really depend on the style of music or even the particular player. A riff can include any of these elements:
• unique chord voicing(s)
• distinctive rhythm(s)
• hammer-ons/pull-offs
• fills & ornaments
• passing tones & chords
• unusual playing techniques
• other embellishments

The possibilities are nearly endless!
When it comes right down to it, most songs are the same. That is, they're all based on chords. What makes one song-or style, or artist-different from another, is what they do with those chords. This is where Rhythm Riffs comes in.
Each riff in this book is based on a simple chord-like A, Em, G7, etc. The chord label doesn't necessarily reflect the actual voicing used; it just shows you what type of chord you may want to play the riff over. This means you can start "plugging in" the riffs right away-putting them into songs, grooves, jams, whatever.
But here's where things get really interesting: Each riff isn't just played once. Instead, through various stylistic nuances, each riff is "morphed" into five different genres of music: rock, blues, jazz, country, and funk.* This gives you an option for just about any style you could possibly play! With twelve major riffs, twelve minor riffs, and twelve dominant seventh riffs, plus the five stylistic variations for each, you've got 180 potential riffs for bolstering your rhythm guitar vocabulary. The last section of the book features eight variations on the 12-bar blues, also done in various styles, which provide interesting rhythmic ideas and chord voicings for this most popular and highly used song form. Folk, R&B, and pop are occasional alternate styles.

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
There is no right or wrong way to use this book. Some players may want to play each riff in its entirety; others will want to pick and choose just a few chord voicings or techniques out of various riffs. Some players may want to focus on one particular style and learn only those riffs. The option is always yours. If you started the book at the beginning, it would take you quite a while to get to some of the ideas at the end. Therefore, you may want to "preview" the book first: Listen to the CD while following along with the book, and keep track of the selections that you like. Make those your first playing priority. On the CD, each riff is played twice (fast, then slow); the total CD length is just over an hour. Track 45 contains tuning notes.

HOW TO PRACTICE
When learning the riff selections, practice them along at a speed at which you can play flawlessly. If you try to play them fast too soon, the "slop factor" can be too great. (Always give yourself plenty of time to learn each riff; there's a lot of them here and the tendency may be to rush, but each riff is worth taking your time with.) Using a metronome is very helpful for gradually speeding up pieces that you are trying to learn. Start at a reasonable tempo, and as your skill dictates, increase the tempo. When trying to apply the riffs, some incubation time is again a good idea. It may help you to have certain tunes in mindperhaps a song for which you're having trouble finding fresh rhythm ideas. You can try the riffs at your next band rehearsal, record them as you playa tune to see how they sound, play along with records, or whatever it takes to feel conversant with them. Never force a riff, though; strive to make your playing musical. When something works, you'll know it. The 12-bar variations at the end of the book can be used in their entirety or can be cross-mutated by joining some of the different variations together. The idea is to give you a strong rhythmic vocabulary for com ping a blues in any genre.

SPECIAL TECHNIQUES
There are two specialized (right-hand) techniques used in this book on occasion-most often in the country-style riffs-that may require a little explaining before we proceed. One is Travis-style picking, and the other is chicken pickin'.
The Travis-style selections in this book are written as two parts like the example below. The lower part can be played with the thumb, while the higher register can be played with the first and second fingers. A hybrid picking ("pick & fingers") approach may also be employed by playing the lower register with your pick while your middle and ring fingers catch the other notes. In either case, muting the lower notes with the palm of your picking hand gives the desired rhythmic approach for this style.

Chicken pickin' means different things to different people, but it basically involves using muting of one form or another to achieve a "clucking"-type sound indicative of a lot of great country guitarists. The muting used to produce chicken pickin', as it occurs in this book, can best be explained with the example below. The three notes of the first A chord are simultaneously plucked by the index, middle, and ring fingers. These same fingers are immediately used to dampen the strings, and the thumb is used to pluck the open A string (which is being muted by the index finger) to produce the "cluck." By rapidly going back and forth between the open chord and the muffled "cluck," your chicken pickin' sequence begins to take shape.

 

RHYTHM RIFFS giver you major, minor, and dominant 7th riffs for nearly any musical situation. Over 200 riffs in all !

CD includes each riff played at full speed and at a slower practica tempo !

 

ROCK

BLUES

JAZZ

COUNTRY

FUNK 

Price: €15,99
€15,99

MORE DOBRO, A Lesson in Lap-Style Dobro Playing. Doug Cox. TABLATURE DVD

MORE DOBRO, A Lesson in Lap-Style Dobro Playing. Doug Cox. TAB. DVD

Series: Fretted
Publisher: Centerstream Publications
Medium: DVD
Author: Doug Cox

Take a private lesson with Doug Cox! There's no better way to start from scratch on this expressive instrument than with this master instructor. Teaches notes and major chords; common I, IV, V chord progressions in all keys; chucking (back-up playing); tone and damping tips; and easy versions of the songs: The Water Is Wide -Worried Man Blues -St. Anne's Reel. Includes a transcription booklet. 60 min.

Price: €23,00
€23,00
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